Britain’s wealthiest spend more on takeaway coffee than on donations, Charity Commission boss says – as he urges top earners to ‘dig a little deeper’ and give more to good causes

  • Orlando Fraser slammed fat cats not ‘pulling their weight’ as donations plummet

Britain’s richest people spend more on takeaway coffee than they do on donations, the head of the Charity Commission has revealed.

Orlando Fraser slammed fat cats for not ‘pulling their weight’ as it emerged they are giving less than ever – while ordinary people are giving more. 

Donations within the top bracket of earners has plummeted by 20 per cent in the last decade, while their earnings have increased by 10 per cent. 

The estimated average donations by the top one per cent was £48, according to a 2021 Pro Bono Economics report.

It comes despite the UK being the third most generous nation in the world, according to the Charities Aid Foundation. 

This is ‘a good deal less, I would venture, than many within this income bracket spend on takeaway coffees each month,’ Mr Fraser told a lecture at the University of Kent to honour Dame Stephanie Shirley, The Telegraph reported. 

Orlando Fraser slammed fat cats for not ‘pulling their weight’ as it was revealed they are giving less than ever -saying they spend more on their coffees than they give to the needy. Pictured: File photo

The estimated average donations by the top one per cent was £48, according to a 2021 Pro Bono Economics report. Pictured: File photo

The estimated average donations by the top one per cent was £48, according to a 2021 Pro Bono Economics report. Pictured: File photo

Philanthropist Dame Stephanie is said to have pioneered the idea of women going back to work after a career break. She is said to have given away to almost £70 million to good causes, primarily in the fields of autism and IT.

The broadsheet reported he told the students the ‘challenge…  relates specifically to the top 1 per cent of earners and owners in the UK who the evidence suggests, at this time in our history, are not pulling their charitable weight.’

He continued: ‘Giving – certainly among the top 1 per cent of earners in our society – is also a moral imperative and, increasingly, a societal necessity.’

The Charities Aid Foundation estimate that last year Brits donated a stunning £12.7 billion – more than ever before. 

The UK is the third most generous country in the world, behind only Indonesia and Myanmar.

But it drops to 58 in the world for volunteering and 112 for helping a stranger – with just half of the country saying they have helped someone they don’t know in the last month.

The charity’s index includes data from 142 countries where people were asked three questions: have they helped a stranger, given money or volunteered for a good cause over the past month.

Neil Heslop OBE, Chief Executive of the Charities Aid Foundation, said: ‘This year’s CAF World Giving Index shows a rather mixed picture for the UK. 

‘We are still one of the most generous countries in the world for giving money – even when times are so tough – but overall we have slipped down the Index over the last decade.’