Jeremy Corbyn compares himself to Marmite: Labour leader ‘accepts’ he’s a divisive figure

Jeremy Corbyn compares himself to Marmite: Labour leader ‘accepts’ he’s a divisive figure when asked about how the party is being abandoned by many working-class supporters

Labour leader outlines plans to lower voting age to 16 before second referendumJeremy Corbyn admitted he is like Marmite and appeared to accept he is divisiveMr Corbyn says he likes the spread and even has a jar himself in his cupboard

Jeremy Corbyn admitted yesterday he is like Marmite as he is disliked by many voters.

The Labour leader appeared to accept he was a divisive figure when asked about how the party is being abandoned by many of its traditional working-class supporters.

It came at a news conference in London where he revealed plans to lower the voting age to 16 before a second Brexit referendum.

Mr Corbyn said it would be a priority for his government to lower the voting age so young people can take part in the Brexit referendum Labour has pledged to hold within six months of getting into power

Mr Corbyn proclaimed the benefits of Marmite as he faced questions on whether Labour would fare better among working-class voters if he was not leader.

He said: ‘I think Marmite’s really good for you. Some people like it and some people don’t. I lead the party and I’m proud to lead the party. As prime minister, I want to bring our country together.

‘I could reply in lots of ways but I believe personal abuse and personal attacks demean and lower politics, so I never reply. That’s how it is with me. I’ve got a jar of Marmite in my cupboard to prove it.’

Jeremy Corbyn admitted yesterday he is like Marmite as he is disliked by many voters

Jeremy Corbyn admitted yesterday he is like Marmite as he is disliked by many voters

Shadow Chancellor John McDonnell later tried to play down the comments, telling the Mumsnet website: ‘I don’t think he is a divisive person. His whole political life has been about bringing people together. However, when you are challenging the establishment and yes, the powerful and the wealthy, those that have the power and the wealth will do everything they can to attack and undermine him.’

Mr Corbyn said it would be a priority for his government to lower the voting age so young people can take part in the Brexit referendum Labour has pledged to hold within six months of getting into power.

The Tories have accused him of seeking to rig the vote so Remain has a better chance of winning.

Mr Corbyn said: ‘We have been very clear from our previous manifesto, as well as this one, that we will lower the voting age to 16 as we think that’s the right thing to do. Sixteen-year-olds already vote in Scotland and in Wales and we think that should be extended across the whole of the UK.

‘It’s young people’s future that’s at stake here – let them take part in that discussion and in that debate. We will be doing that as a priority in a Labour government.’

The voting age has been 18 for general elections since 1969 when it was lowered from 21 by Harold Wilson’s Labour government.

The Liberal Democrats, the SNP, Green Party and Plaid Cymru have also all pledged to lower the voting age to 16 but it is opposed by the Conservative Party.

Mr Corbyn proclaimed the benefits of Marmite as he faced questions on whether Labour would fare better among working-class voters if he was not leader. The party leader is pictured in a BBC debate last night with PM Boris Johnson

Mr Corbyn proclaimed the benefits of Marmite as he faced questions on whether Labour would fare better among working-class voters if he was not leader. The party leader is pictured in a BBC debate last night with PM Boris Johnson