Job being advertised to work as boat deckhand on UK’s most remote inhabited island – where sheep outnumber people

Job being advertised to work as boat deckhand on UK’s most remote inhabited island – where sheep outnumber people

A job is being advertised to work as a boat deckhand on the UK’s most remote inhabited island – where sheep outnumber people.

Fair Isle, which is 24 miles from the Shetland Mainland in Scotland, has a population of just 60 people and is known for its fishing and crofting community. 

The island is thought to have been populated for 6,000 years, with Norway owning it in the 14th century.

Today the island is owned by the National Trust for Scotland – the proud advertisers of the exciting new job opportunity to work as a deckhand on the local ferry MV Good Shepherd.

The candidate will work 31.5 hours a week and receive a maximum annual salary of £24,539. This includes an annual payment of £1,279 under the Scottish government’s Distant Islands Allowance, to encourage qualified workers to take jobs on remote islands. 

A job is being advertised to work as a boat deckhand on the UK’s most remote inhabited island Fair Isle – where sheep outnumber people

Fair Isle, which is 24 miles from the Shetland Mainland in Scotland, has a population of just 60 people

Fair Isle, which is 24 miles from the Shetland Mainland in Scotland, has a population of just 60 people

The island can be reached by a two-and-a-half-hour ferry trip or 25-minute flight from Shetland

The island can be reached by a two-and-a-half-hour ferry trip or 25-minute flight from Shetland

Unsurprisingly, expenses will be paid to those attending the interview for the new role. 

The requirements also state that one ‘must have the ability to travel throughout Shetland at short notice and where public transport is limited’, though they are ‘happy to talk flexible working’.

The island population is said to be ‘thrilled to meet some new faces and are eager to highlight the ways the successful candidate can become involved in local life’.

James Stout, who lives on Fair Isle, said: ‘It’s an opportunity to be part of a living community, which is rare nowadays. 

‘It’s a community looking to the future.’

The National Trust will also provide a family home on the island to the successful applicant, provided they meet the charity’s rental criteria.

Clea Warner, the National Trust for Scotland’s Regional Director for the Highlands and Islands, said: ‘Having been in Fair Isle myself at the beginning of October, I know very well what a beautiful and friendly place it is.

‘For anyone who loves outdoors and wildlife, there’s no place like it. The community are very dynamic and welcoming, and committed to keeping Fair Isle as a thriving place to live.

‘The new job opening on the island is a fantastic opportunity to be part of this amazing place for themselves.

‘It’s always pleasing to see job opportunities come up in Fair Isle.

The island is thought to have been populated for 6,000 years, with Norway owning it in the 14th century

The island is thought to have been populated for 6,000 years, with Norway owning it in the 14th century

Today the island is owned by the National Trust for Scotland

Today the island is owned by the National Trust for Scotland

‘Our charity continues to engage with the community and with organisations such as Highlands & Islands Enterprise and Shetland Islands Council to support the sustainability of this island, which it’s our privilege to care for and share.

‘We hope that the new ferry job advertised will attract plenty of interest and look forward to welcoming the successful applicant to the island.’

Fair Isle is around 25 miles south of the Shetland Mainland and 25 miles north of North Ronaldsay in Orkney. 

It can be reached by a two-and-a-half-hour ferry trip or 25-minute flight from Shetland. 

The island – which is roughly three square miles – is known for its natural beauty, knitwear and seabirds including around 10,000 puffins at the last count.