Outrage as garbos are caught dumping recycling and rubbish together in the same truck

Millions of Victorians will soon have to sort their waste into four separate bins in a major overhaul to the state’s recycling system.

The initiative will cost the state government $515million with residents to transition to using four bins, including a new glass-only purple one, by 2030.

In 2021, the bins were introduced in areas across regional Victoria and Melbourne’s outer suburbs with plans to eventually include every household.

Residents in those 13 councils were used to trial the scheme, which officials have touted as the first recycling overhaul of its kind in Australia.

Some residents in Victoria already seperate their waste into four bins with the newest addition the purple top (right) to be used for glass-only to avoid contamination

The initiative will cost the state government $515million with residents to transition to using four bins, including a new purple one, by 2030 (pictured, Victorian Premier Daniel Andrews)

The initiative will cost the state government $515million with residents to transition to using four bins, including a new purple one, by 2030 (pictured, Victorian Premier Daniel Andrews)

The purple bin will be used for glass in addition to red, yellow and green bins.

Soft plastics, wrappers and soiled food containers can be put in the yellow bin, with residents having to take some plastics to supermarkets to recycle.

The green FOGO bin (Food Organics Garden Organics), is used for organic waste, while the red bin is used for general household waste.

Victoria’s environment Minister, Lily D’Ambrosio, said Victoria was the first state in Australia to attempt a major recycling overhaul.

NSW typically separates its rubbish into compost (left), recycling and landfill (right)

NSW typically separates its rubbish into compost (left), recycling and landfill (right)

‘We’re the first state in Australia to roll out the same bins to every household, and the first to include soft plastics and pizza boxes in those bins,’ she said.

Ms D’Ambrosio last year said the Circular Economy (Waste Reduction and Recycling) Bill, would bring clarity to Victoria’s recycling sector.

‘For too long, we’ve had a sector that has been desegregated, that has been very disjointed, with a whole range of different rules existing across a whole range of different municipalities, making it really hard for Victorians who want to do the right thing in terms of recycling,’ she said.

Ms D’Amboriso said the new system would save 650,000 tonnes of organic waste from entering landfill, boost Victoria’s economy by up to $6.7 billion by 2030 and create nearly 4000 jobs.

Frankston, in Melbourne’s southern suburbs, is next on the list to join the container deposit scheme and will receive the new purple bins in 2023.

Australia’s states and territories all use different systems to allocate garbage bins.

Western Australian residents have three bin systems they can choose from, with many opting for red (waste), yellow (recyclables) and green (plant materials) - a fourth bin is pending for many purely for organic waste

Western Australian residents have three bin systems they can choose from, with many opting for red (waste), yellow (recyclables) and green (plant materials) – a fourth bin is pending for many purely for organic waste

In NSW, most households are given a general waste bin (red lid), recycling bin (yellow lid) and garden vegetation bin (green lid).

Some households may also have a maroon-lidded bin for food scraps, for residents in the Inner West and City of Sydney council areas.

In Queensland, residents are encouraged to divide their bins into general waste, recycling and garden waste.

Last November, the Sunshine State began a 12 month trial of green organic waste bins in three councils – Townsville City Council, Rockhampton Regional Council and Lockyer Valley Regional Council.

South Australia operates under a three-bin system, with a red bin for general waste, yellow bin for recyclables and a green bin for items such as food scraps, paper towels, tissues and garden scraps.

All Victorian households will have to sort their waste into four separate bins by 2030, under new laws to be introduced to state parliament (stock image of people collecting garbage)

All Victorian households will have to sort their waste into four separate bins by 2030, under new laws to be introduced to state parliament (stock image of people collecting garbage)

Tasmanians have successfully implemented the organic waste bins along with the standard household rubbish bin which has either a red, dark green or black lid, and a classic yellow-lid bin for recyclables.

In the ACT, most homes feature a standard 140 litre red-lid garbage bin and a 240 litre yellow-lid recycling bin. Residents can apply for a green bin for organic waste for a one-off registration fee of $50.

Typically, WA households have three bin systems to choose from. The two-bin system sees residents allocated one yellow bin for recyclables and one red bin for general waste.

Alternatively, the three-bin garden organics (GO) system, sees residents given an additional green-lidded bin for plant materials. Locals can choose a three-bin food organics, garden organics (FOGO) system. The main difference is the green bin can also process food scraps and paper products.

The Top End operate using the two-bin model. Residents can divide their waste between two bins – a red-lidded bin for general waste and a yellow-lid bin for recycling.