Turkey acquires new military drone with a machine gun mount that can fire bursts of 15 bullets

Turkey acquires new military drone with a machine gun mount that can fire bursts of 15 bullets and is braced by robotic arms to offset weapon recoil

  • The Songar drone can carry 200 bullets for its bottom-mounted machine gun
  • The drone was developed by the tech firm Asisguard, based in Ankara
  • The Turkish military will be the first client to purchase the Songar drones

Turkey will be the first customer for a new military drone with a machine gun mount that can fire single shots or 15-round bursts and carry a total of 200 rounds.

Developed by the Asisguard, a technology firm in Ankara that specializes in military technology, the drone will use a laser sighting system to deliver a high degree of accuracy.

The drone will also use a set of robotic braces to offset weapon recoil and ensure the drone’s flight path isn’t thrown off by firing.

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The Turkish military will be the first in the world to use Songar (pictured above), an armored drone with a machine gun mounted beneath its body

According to a report in the New Scientist, the drone will be able to hit targets as small as six inches from a distance of up to 650 feet.

The 55-pound drone, called Songar, will be able to travel up to six miles at heights of up to 1.7 miles above ground. 

The machine gun will be equipped to fire 5.56 x 45mm NATO class bullets.

Songar drones can be flown in groups of up to three, all of which can be operated by a single controller.

The Songar drone can fire single shots or 15-bullet bursts and carry up to 200 bullets

The Songar drone can fire single shots or 15-bullet bursts and carry up to 200 bullets

The drone will also come equipped with a camera to make it useful for scouting and surveillance missions.

Songar will use GPS for navigation and its vision system will be operable day or night.

A pilot will be able to operate up to three Songar drones simultaneously using one controller

A pilot will be able to operate up to three Songar drones simultaneously using one controller

WHAT IS THE SONGAR DRONE? 

The Songar drone is an armored drone with a machine gun mounted under its body.

The gun can fire single shots or 15-bullet bursts, and carry 200 bullets.

 The gun is braced by robotic arms to reduce weapon recoil.

The drone can travel up to six miles and reach a height of 1.7 miles. 

The drone was first announced by Asisguard in the spring, at the International Defence Industry Fair, an annual military technology conference in Istanbul.

The company described Songar as ‘the first Turkish-made automatic shooting stabilized armed drone.’

This summer, the company released a demonstration video showing the drone in action. 

The fictional scenario depicted the drone hovering above a road providing cover fire toward a location where enemy soldiers might be. as a friendly military vehicle safely passes through.

 

White Island volcano body retrieval mission begin on Friday despite chance of eruption

A daring mission to retrieve eight bodies from White Island began at first light – despite a 60 per cent chance the deadly volcano will erupt again. 

A team of eight specialist soldiers from the New Zealand Defence Force landed on the island on Friday morning, risking their lives to recover the bodies of six Australians and two of their countrymen, four days after Monday’s tragic blast. 

The bodies on the island are believed to belong to local tour guides Hayden Marshall-Inman and Tipene Maangi and Australian tourists Krystal Browitt, Richard Elzer, Karla Matthews, Julie Richards, Jessica Richards and Zoe Hosking.

But others, including married couple Martin and Barbara Hollander, as well as Anthony Langford, his wife Kristine and their daughter Winona, remain unaccounted for.

The bodies are believed to be laying about 300 metres from the crater, within 200 square metres, in small clusters and buried under about one metre of ash. 

A haka was performed from the shore as helicopters began sweeping over the island at 5.30am, local time, on Friday. 

A daring mission to retrieve eight bodies from White Island will begin at first light on Friday – despite a 60 per cent chance the deadly volcano will erupt again

The expedition comes after New Zealand's geological monitoring agency, GNS Science, upgraded the chance of an eruption in the next 24 hours to between 50 and 60 per cent. Pictured: Rescuers land on the White Island after volcanic eruption on Monday December 9 2019

The expedition comes after New Zealand’s geological monitoring agency, GNS Science, upgraded the chance of an eruption in the next 24 hours to between 50 and 60 per cent. Pictured: Rescuers land on the White Island after volcanic eruption on Monday December 9 2019

Family members of the victims have gathered at the Whakatāne wharf carrying flowers and balloons as they await for the bodies of their loved ones to be returned home.

The dangerous mission comes as New Zealand’s geological monitoring agency, GNS Science, upgraded the chance of an eruption in the next 24 hours to between 50 and 60 per cent.  

GNS Science volcanologist Graham Leonard released risk assessment maps showing another eruption was increasingly likely amid Friday’s retrieval.  

‘Whakaari/White Island is an active volcano, and the estimated chance of an eruption is increasing every day,’ Dr Leonard said.

‘Today is less safe than yesterday, and the day before that.’

‘The red zone shows an area that would be considered a no-go for GNS Science staff, and the yellow zone would only be accessible in exceptional circumstances.’

Mr Leonard said the information had been handed to New Zealand police to ensure the safety of their team.

New Zealand police deputy commissioner Mike Clement said ‘we have a plan’ when confirming the operation would go ahead.  

Krystal Eve Browitt (pictured) is believed to be one of the eight bodies on White Island

Krystal Eve Browitt (pictured) is believed to be one of the eight bodies on White Island 

NEW ZEALAND POLICE STATEMENT ON RESCUE MISSION 

Thursday December 12

Tomorrow morning we have a plan, the resources and the capability to the recover the bodies on Whakaari / White Island.

The plan is contingent on a number of risk factors which will be assessed at the time. These factors include the conditions on the island and the weather.

Tomorrow morning New Zealand Defence Force assets and people with specialist capabilities from Defence, Police and other agencies will undertake the operation. 

Returning the bodies on the island to their loved ones remains our focus. 

We have the right people with the right skills and the right equipment. We will make every effort to recover all of the bodies however our plan is subject to things beyond our control such as the island and the weather. A lot has to go right for us tomorrow to make this work. 

There is no zero risk option in regard to the plan but we have carefully considered it. We don’t expect the risk to change tonight or tomorrow but we have planned for it. 

We will provide updates on tomorrow’s recovery operation as they come to hand. 

Commissioner Mike Bush has returned from overseas and will be in Whakatane tomorrow.

In this image released by GeoNet, tourists can be seen on a trail near the volcano's crater on Monday

In this image released by GeoNet, tourists can be seen on a trail near the volcano’s crater on Monday

‘The team has been working tirelessly throughout the day as I promised they would,’ Mr Clement said.

‘Shortly after first light tomorrow, NZDF assets, people and capabilities will deploy to the island.

‘Assisted by specialist capabilities from other agencies including New Zealand Police, they will go onto the island and they will make every effort to recover all of the bodies from the island and return them.’

But the commissioner was quick to reiterate the fragility of the expedition.  

‘Let there be no mistake, it is not a zero-risk game and people are putting themselves on the front line to do the right thing,’ he said.

‘Of course I’m worried, I’d be inhuman if I wasn’t worried.’ 

Eight soldiers travelled to the island via helicopter stationed on a nearby navy vessel, the HMNZS Wellington.

GNS Science volcanologist Graham Leonard released risk assessment maps showing another eruption was increasingly likely amid the retrieval. GNS staff access zones are pictured on December 2

GNS Science volcanologist Graham Leonard released risk assessment maps showing another eruption was increasingly likely amid the retrieval. GNS staff access zones are pictured on December 2

'Whakaari/White Island is an active volcano, and the estimated chance of an eruption is increasing every day,' Dr Leonard said. GNS staff access zones are pictured on December 12

‘Whakaari/White Island is an active volcano, and the estimated chance of an eruption is increasing every day,’ Dr Leonard said. GNS staff access zones are pictured on December 12

It is expected to take about 15 minutes to walk from the shore to the region where the retrieval would take place.

If all goes well, the bodies will then be transported to the mainland.

Mr Clement confirmed their surveillance had only spotted six bodies, despite believing their are eight people missing.  

‘We know exactly where (the six) are. So our first priority will be to get those six people,’ he said.

‘We can’t find anything more than six. That’s not to say they aren’t there.

‘We will have very limited opportunity to look about for one or two others.’ 

White Island erupted at 2.11pm local time on Monday (pictured)

White Island erupted at 2.11pm local time on Monday (pictured)

Nico Fournier, a GNS volcanologist charged with providing information to the emergency committee, said the level of risk was one part of the conversation, and the acceptability of that risk was another.

‘You wouldn’t jump in a car which is engulfed in flames if nothing was in there. If it’s your child, you will,’ he said.

‘That acceptability of risk is an important conversation.’

GNS also said current monitoring showed the appearance of shallow magma beneath the vent.   

National Emergency Management Agency director Sarah Stuart-Black said the decision had the support of the committee.

‘This is a police decision … this will be their decision and I’ll support them,’ she said.  

The return of the bodies is a white-hot issue in Whakatane, particularly for the families of local tour guides Marshall Inman and Tipene Maangi, whose bodies lie near the crater.

Julie Richards, 47, and her daughter Jessica, 20, (pictured) from Brisbane, were on the cruise. The pair were both confirmed dead on Wednesday and are believed to be on the island

Julie Richards, 47, and her daughter Jessica, 20, (pictured) from Brisbane, were on the cruise. The pair were both confirmed dead on Wednesday and are believed to be on the island

Karla Mathews and Richard Elzer were confirmed dead by their friends on Wednesday. They are believed to be among the eight bodies on White Island

Karla Mathews and Richard Elzer were confirmed dead by their friends on Wednesday. They are believed to be among the eight bodies on White Island

Whakatane Mayor Judy Turner said there was a ‘growing desperation’ among families to see bodies returned.

The death toll of Australians killed in the tragedy rose to nine on Thursday morning after Sydney brothers Berend Hollander, 16, and Matthew, 13, were both confirmed dead.

The teenage boys, who both attended the prestigious Knox Grammar school, were travelling with their parents Martin and Barbara – who are both still missing.

Jason Griffiths, 33, from Coffs Harbour, NSW, died from his injuries on Wednesday after being taken to hospital in critical condition. 

He had been travelling with couple Karla Mathews, 32, and Richard Elzer, 32, who were identified as those still on the island and are now dead, friends said. 

Zoe Hosking, 15, and stepfather Gavin Dallow, 53, from Adelaide, were also killed in the disaster, the family’s spokesperson said on Wednesday.

Mr Dallow’s body was identified by police from the five bodies recovered from the island, but Zoe’s remains are still there and she is presumed dead.

The two were on a tour of White Island on Monday with the girl’s mother Lisa Hosking, 48, when the eruption occurred.

Zoe Hosking, 15, was confirmed dead on Wednesday. Her mum Lisa Hosking, from Adelaide, is in critical condition

Gavin Dallow, 53, was identified by police on Wednesday from the five bodies recovered from the island. He had been on holiday with wife Lisa Hosking and stepdaughter Zoe

The Hosking/Dallow family had been on a tour at the time of the eruption. Mum Lisa Hosking is among the injured in hospital. Her husband Gavin (right) 53, and 15-year-old daughter Zoe, from Adelaide, (left) were confirmed dead on Wednesday 

Brothers Berend Hollander, 16, and Matthew, 13, were confirmed dead on Thursday morning. The boys, who went to Knox Grammar School in Sydney, were with their parents Matthew and Berend Hollander - who are both still missing and feared dead

Brothers Berend Hollander, 16, and Matthew, 13, were confirmed dead on Thursday morning. The boys, who went to Knox Grammar School in Sydney, were with their parents Matthew and Berend Hollander – who are both still missing and feared dead 

Ms Hosking, a petroleum engineer, is believed to have suffered burns to 60 per cent of her body and is now fighting for her life in hospital.

Her brother David flew in to New Zealand after the disaster and scoured hospitals for the family, eventually finding her.

‘We mourn the loss of Gavin and Zoe. Gavin was a wonderful son and brother,’ a family spokesperson said in a statement.

‘We’ll miss him at the cricket and we’ll miss him at the football. He was a generous man, always helping his family and his community.

‘Our hearts break at the loss of Zoe at such a young age.

‘We know her loss will also devastate her school community and the local Girl Guides, of which she was an active member.

'Our hearts break at the loss of Zoe at such a young age,' the family said in a statement confirming her death. Zoe is believed to be among the eight bodies on the island

‘Our hearts break at the loss of Zoe at such a young age,’ the family said in a statement confirming her death. Zoe is believed to be among the eight bodies on the island

Lisa Hosking (pictured with Gavin), a petroleum engineer, is believed to have suffered burns to 60 per cent of her body and is now fighting for her life in hospital

Lisa Hosking (pictured with Gavin), a petroleum engineer, is believed to have suffered burns to 60 per cent of her body and is now fighting for her life in hospital

Krystal Browitt (pictured), 21, was on White Island when it erupted and is still missing. She is believed to be among the eight bodies on White Island

Krystal Browitt (pictured), 21, was on White Island when it erupted and is still missing. She is believed to be among the eight bodies on White Island

‘The Dallow family is extremely thankful for the support from relatives, Rotary, the local church community and the broader community.

‘We would also like to acknowledge the assistance received from DFAT , emergency services and the very understanding New Zealand Police.’

Julie Richards, 47, and her daughter Jessica, 20, from Brisbane, were the first two Australians confirmed dead, earlier on Wednesday. 

Krystal Browitt, 21, was on a tour of White Island with her father Paul and sister Stephanie when it erupted on Monday. 

She remains unaccounted for and her body is believed to be on the island. 

Ms Browitt’s mother Marie bypassed the tour and stayed aboard Ovation of the Seas.

Meanwhile, Stephanie and her dad have been fighting for their lives and were in induced comas in Auckland and Christchurch hospitals.

On Thursday, Mr Browitt was among those victims who were flown back to Australia for further treatment. 

Sydney parents Martin and Barbara Hollander as well as Sydney family Anthony Langford, 51, his wife Kristine and daughter Winona, 17, are also listed as missing.

Australian death toll so far: Nine named as dead or presumed dead

Twenty four Australians were among 47 on White Island when it erupted.  

Eleven are dead or presumed dead but not all have been named.

New Zealand Police said there was a ‘definitive’ list of those who are in hospital but could not be released due to privacy reasons.  

THE DEAD:

Julie Richards, 47, and her daughter Jessica, 20, from Brisbane.

Julie Richards, 47, and her daughter Jessica, 20, (pictured) from Brisbane are among the dead

Julie Richards, 47, and her daughter Jessica, 20, (pictured) from Brisbane are among the dead

Gavin Dallow, 53, and stepdaughter Zoe Hosking, 15, from Adelaide 

Lisa Dallow's 15-year-old daughter Zoe (pictured) has been confirmed dead

Gavin Dallow, from Adelaide, has been confirmed dead

The Hosking/Dallow family had been on a tour at the time of the eruption. Mum Lisa Dallow is among the injured in hospital. Her husband Gavin (right) 53, and 15-year-old daughter Zoe, from Adelaide, (left) were confirmed dead on Wednesday 

Mr Dallow’s body was identified by police from the five bodies recovered from the island, but Zoe’s remains are still there and she is presumed dead.

Karla Mathews, 32, and Richard Elzer, 32, from Coffs Harbour, NSW 

Karla Mathews (left), 32, is missing. Her boyfriend Richard Elzer (right), 32, from Coffs Harbour, is in hospital

Karla Mathews (left), 32, is dead as is boyfriend Richard Elzer (right), 32, from Coffs Harbour

The couple were identified as those tourists still on the island and therefore presumed dead by their families on Wednesday.

Jason Griffiths, 33, Coffs Harbour, NSW  

Jason Griffiths, 33, from Coffs Harbour is in critical condition in hospital

Jason Griffiths, 33, from Coffs Harbour was taken to hospital in critical condition but died from his injuries on Wednesday 

Jason Griffiths, 33, from Coffs Harbour, NSW, died from his injuries on Wednesday after being taken to hospital in critical condition. 

He had been on a tour of the volcano with couple Karla Mathews, 32, and Richard Elzer, 32, who are now presumed dead, friends said.  

Matthew (Year 8) and Berend Hollander (Year 10) from Sydney

Matthew Hollander

Berend Hollander

Matthew (left, year eight) and Berend (right, year 10) Hollander were confirmed dead on Thursday morning

Knox Grammar schoolboy brothers Matthew, 13, and Berend, 16, Hollander were confirmed dead on Thursday morning.

They died in two New Zealand hospitals after escaping the island with horrific burns.  

THE MISSING: 

Martin and Barbara Hollander  

According to his Linkedin profile, Mr Hollander works at Transport for NSW as a freight initiatives manager.

He is also a director at a Singaporean investment management firm, Wipunen Incrementum Capital.

He was on a family holiday with his wife, who remains unaccounted for, and two kids, who were confirmed dead on Thursday. 

Parents Martin and Barbara, who were on the island with their sons when the eruption hit on Monday, are listed among the missing

Parents Martin and Barbara, who were on the island with their sons when the eruption hit on Monday, are listed among the missing

Anthony Langford, 51, wife Kristine, and daughter Winona, 17

Mr Langford works for Sydney Water. 

Jesse Langford, 18, is in hospital being treated

Jesse Langford's parents and 17-year-old sister, from north Sydney, are still listed as missing. The family (pictured together) toured the volcano on Monday as part of a cruise holiday

Jesse Langford’s parents and 17-year-old sister, from north Sydney, are still listed as missing. The family (pictured together) toured the volcano on Monday as part of a cruise holiday

Krystal Browitt, 21, from Melbourne 

She was on the cruise for her 21st birthday with family. 

Her father Paul is in a coma in Auckland and her sister Stephanie is in a Christchurch hospital, while her mother Marie stayed on the cruiseliner. 

Krystal Browitt was on the cruise for her 21st birthday with family

Krystal Browitt was on the cruise for her 21st birthday with family

THE INJURED: 

Lisa Dallow, 49, from Adelaide

She is an induced coma in Hamilton Hospital, with 57 per cent of her body burnt

Lisa Dallow (right with her husband Gavin who is missing), 49, from Adelaide

Lisa Dallow (right with her husband Gavin who is missing), 49, from Adelaide

Jesse Langford, 19

He has been identified among the injured in hospital but his condition is not clear

Found: Jesse Langford (pictured with Michelle Spring, believed to be his girlfriend) is in hospital but his condition is not clear

Found: Jesse Langford (pictured with Michelle Spring, believed to be his girlfriend) is in hospital but his condition is not clear

 

George Laurer, Who Developed the Bar Code, Is Dead at 94

George J. Laurer, whose design of the vertically striped bar code sped supermarket checkout lines, parcel deliveries and assembly lines and even transformed human beings, including airline passengers and hospital patients, into traceable inventory items, died on Dec. 5 at his home in Wendell, N.C., near Raleigh. He was 94.

His death was confirmed by his son Craig.

The Universal Product Code made its official debut in 1974, when a scanner registered 67 cents for a 10-pack of Wrigley’s Juicy Fruit chewing gum at a Marsh supermarket in Troy, Ohio. (One of the original scanners is at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History; the package of gum was bought and retained by a Marsh executive.)

“It was cheap, and it was needed,” Mr. Laurer told The New York Times in 2009. “And it is reliable.”

And it revolutionized commerce.

The bar code had evolved over several decades, a product of several collaborators and some fluky coincidences.

The first to lend his expertise was N. Joseph Woodland, an alumnus of the Manhattan Project, developer of the atomic bomb. As an undergraduate at what is now Drexel University in Philadelphia, he had perfected an efficient system for playing music in elevators and planned to market it commercially until his father intervened, insisting that the elevator music industry was controlled by organized crime.

Mr. Woodland was earning a master’s degree at Drexel in the late 1940s when a supermarket executive visiting the university’s engineering school urged students there to develop a practical means of digitally storing product data. With a classmate, Bernard Silver, Mr. Woodland devised a circular symbol resembling a bull’s-eye in which the information could be encoded. But they were ahead of their time: Commercial scanners and microprocessors that could interpret the code were not yet widely available.

In 1951, after abandoning a planned career as a television repairman, Mr. Laurer joined IBM, where he was asked to design a code for food labels modeled on the Woodland-Silver bull’s-eye and compatible with a new generation of optical scanners. But he found that the circular symbol was too blurry when reproduced on high-speed printing presses; instead he developed a rectangular design, with 95 bits of data in binary code containing consumer product information.

Enter Alan L. Haberman, a supermarket executive who headed the Uniform Grocery Product Code Council, which had been organized to choose a universal product code symbol. He favored Mr. Laurer’s design, but the members of his committee were split.

Mr. Haberman reconciled their differences over dinner at a San Francisco restaurant and then invited them to a screening of the X-rated film “Deep Throat.” In April 1973, the committee unanimously voted for the bar code that has appeared on billions of items since. (The original carried an 11-digit formula — six identifying the manufacturer and five identifying the product; a 12th digit was added later as a check.)

The bar code increased the speed of checkout lines by some 40 percent, eliminated labor-intensive placement of price tags on every product, and resulted in fewer register errors and more efficient inventory controls. But Mr. Laurer often said that he was amazed at how omnipresent it became.

The code even made a cameo appearance in presidential politics and became lodged in urban legend.

During the 1992 primary campaign, it was widely reported, in The New York Times and elsewhere, that President George Bush was so out of touch with average Americans that he was baffled by a supermarket bar code scanner he encountered at a grocers’ convention. (It turned out to be a prototype of an advanced version that was not yet commonly available.)

Some fundamentalist Christians have also noted that the so-called three guard bars at the beginning, end and middle of the code resemble the numeral 6, suggesting the number 666, which the Book of Revelation links to an apocalypse.

“It is simply a coincidence,” Mr. Laurer said, “like the fact that my first, middle and last name all have six letters.”

George Joseph Laurer III was born on Sept. 23, 1925, in Manhattan. His father was a lawyer who became a Navy electrical engineer. His mother, Irma (Rudiger) Laurer, provided day care.

George was raised in New Jersey and Baltimore, contracted polio as a teenager and was drafted into the Army during World War II before he had finished high school.

Discharged as a technical sergeant, he was collecting unemployment checks when he enrolled in a radio and TV repair course. After one year, he was persuaded by his instructor to quit, take a high school equivalency exam and enroll in college.

He graduated from the University of Maryland with a bachelor of science degree in electrical engineering in 1951. He also earned amateur radio and private pilot’s licenses.

Mr. Laurer married Marilyn Slocum in 1954. She died in 2013. In addition to his son Craig, he is survived by two other sons, Mark and Jonathan; a daughter, Debra Laurer Cook; three grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren. His sister, Alma Laurer Albert, died earlier.

Mr. Laurer worked for IBM at the Research Triangle Park in North Carolina until 1987. He received 26 patents, including one for a hand-held scanner that reads bar codes. But he earned no royalties from the bar code; IBM did not patent it.

From the beginning, he said, the biggest challenge was to make each printed bar code, along with the optical and laser technology that scanned it, more reliable than a human cashier.

“We learned that people will forgive the cute little grocery store clerk if she mischarges by a few cents,” he said. “If the clerk charges you 97 cents instead of 79 cents, no big deal — that’s O.K., it’s no real problem. But we don’t forgive computers, no matter how bad they are.”

Thousands of artifacts discovered at a 12,500-year-old site in Connecticut

An ancient settlement that dates back 12,500 years has been uncovered in Connecticut  that was once home to southern New England’s earliest inhabitants.

The site was discovered by the Department of Transportation while constructing a bridge over the Farmington River in Avon.

Archaeologists found an open fire pit and a number of posts from temporary housing, along with 15,000 artifacts that were mostly primeval tools.

Catherine Labadia, a staff archaeologist with the State Historic Preservation Office, told The Hartford Courant: ‘This is the once-in-lifetime opportunity to look [at a site of this age] in Connecticut.’

‘This site has the potential to make us understand the first peopling of Connecticut in a way we haven’t been able to.’

An ancient settlement that dates back 12,500 years has been uncovered in Connecticut that experts say was once home to southern New England’s earliest inhabitants. The site was discovered by the Department of Transportation while constructing a bridge over the Farmington River in Avon

The site is located near Old Farms Road old in Avon and dates back to a time known as the Paleoindian Period.

The archaeologist involved in the excavation have named it in honor of Brian D. Jones, the state archaeologist, who died in July.

The team uncovered 15,000 artifacts, most of which are ancient tools, and 27 features.

The features are remnants of what the team calls ‘human activity’.

They include holes and walls — what Senior Archaeologist David Leslie described as ‘traces of behavior’ that have been recorded in the earth.

The site is located near Old Farms Road old in Avon and dates back to a time known as the Paleoindian Period. The archaeologist involved in the excavation have named it in honor of Brian D. Jones, the state archaeologist, who died in July

The site is located near Old Farms Road old in Avon and dates back to a time known as the Paleoindian Period. The archaeologist involved in the excavation have named it in honor of Brian D. Jones, the state archaeologist, who died in July 

Archaeologists found an open fire pit and a number of posts from temporary housing, along with 15,000 artifacts that were mostly primeval tools

Archaeologists found an open fire pit and a number of posts from temporary housing, along with 15,000 artifacts that were mostly primeval tools

 

The team uncovered 15,000 artifacts, most of which are ancient tools, and 27 features. The features are remnants of what the team calls 'human activity

The team uncovered 15,000 artifacts, most of which are ancient tools, and 27 features. The features are remnants of what the team calls ‘human activity

Archaeologists also found an open fire pit, or hearth, and a number of posts from temporary houses.

Leslie noted that just a few Paleoindian features have ever been discovered in this part of the country and the Avon site revealed more than two dozen.

The site shows evidence of the earliest known population in Connecticut, she said.

The Department of Transportation project required deep excavation for the construction of the bridge, which is the only reason this ancient site was discovered.

Labadia said that such a deep dive — the artifacts and features were lodged about 6 feet under the surface — would likely have been cost-prohibitive to archaeologists working on their own.

‘It is these federal laws and the requirements that make people stop, look and listen,’ Labadia said.

‘It’s those laws that really have resulted in the largest identification of archaeological sites.’

The artifacts discovered in Connecticut coincide with a study from 2015 that concluded the North American hunters used spear-throwers to hurl their weapons over longer distances and bring down large prey.

Anthropologists have studied tiny fractures in the stone spear points used by the Paleo-Indian hunters that began appearing in North America between 13,000 and 11,000 years ago.

He found they contained distinctive chips and fractures that match those created in stone tools that have been thrown using a spear-thrower or atlatl.

These are essentially levers that are attached to the end of the spear or dart, allowing it to be thrown far faster and further than if thrown by hand like a javelin.

The technology is widely thought to be a predecessor of the bow and arrow that later became common among the Native cultures in North America.

The new study, conducted by Professor Karl Hutchings, an anthropologist at Thompson Rivers University in Canada, suggests that some of the earliest prehistoric humans to arrive in North America, known as the Clovis people, brought this technology with them.

It also helps to support theories that these early hunters were able to kill large prey like mammoths and other megafauna..

The site shows evidence of the earliest known population in Connecticut, she said. The Department of Transportation project required deep excavation for the construction of the bridge, which is the only reason this ancient site was discovered

The site shows evidence of the earliest known population in Connecticut, she said. The Department of Transportation project required deep excavation for the construction of the bridge, which is the only reason this ancient site was discovered

The Department of Transportation project required deep excavation for the construction of the bridge, which is the only reason this ancient site was discovered

The Department of Transportation project required deep excavation for the construction of the bridge, which is the only reason this ancient site was discovered

Professor Hutchings said that it was unlikely a handthrown spear with a stone point, or flute point as they are also known, alone would be enough to bring down such large animals, but a spear-thrower could give hunters the edge they needed.

This, he said, would have allowed these cultures to spread far more efficiently around the continent and inhabit a wide range of landscapes.

He said: ‘Close-range weapons such as the javelin or spear are well-suited to terrain-based hunting strategies.

‘With their requirement to drive game into trapping areas and knick points, terrain-based strategies tether big game hunters to specific locations and features, and generally require a considerable number of participants.

‘Such features and strategies should enhance greatly the success rates of those close-range weapons.

‘In contrast, in addition to providing Paleoindian hunters increased lethality and safety, the portability and range of the spear-thrower may have meant that Paleoindian hunters were not tethered to trapping areas and knick points, thereby facilitating greater mobility and reduced hunting-group sizes.’

 

Husky Sky eats Cardiff owner’s retro 1970s sofa

And what are you going to do about it? Scary-looking Sky the husky eats her horrified owner’s ‘irreplaceable’ 1970s retro sofa 

  • Simon O’Conner, 36, couldn’t believe it when he saw his dog had eaten his sofa
  • He was asleep at home in Cardiff when the naughty pooch committed the crime 
  • He paid £1,700 for three-year-old Sky and says he can’t be angry at her 

A pet husky is in the doghouse after eating her owner’s beloved 1970s retro sofa to pieces. 

Simon O’Conner, 36, was horrified to find his ‘irreplaceable’ sofa torn to pieces with Sky gnawing at the stuffing. 

The 36-year-old, who lives in Cardiff, thinks three-year-old Sky chewed the furniture because of her nesting instinct.    

Businessman Simon, said: ‘I’ve never seen her like that before. She was desperate to nest and decided to eat my vintage 1970’s sofa which was my pride and joy.

Simon O’Conner, 36, was horrified to find his ‘irreplaceable’ sofa torn to pieces with his pet husky Sky gnawing at the stuffing

Devastated: Simon was horrified when he saw the stuffing of his beloved sofa all over the floor

Devastated: Simon was horrified when he saw the stuffing of his beloved sofa all over the floor

‘I was fast asleep in bed and I came downstairs and saw the insides of my sofa all over the floor. I wanted to kill her – it’s lucky I love her so much.

‘The sofa cost me a fortune and it’s irreplaceable because it is 50 years old. I still can’t believe it.’

Simon, of Cardiff, paid £1,700 for husky Sky when she was eight-weeks-old – but she soon began chewing up his house.

He said: ‘She was adorable and so cute, I could never have imagined what mayhem she was going to cause. She seems hell-bent on destroying my things.

He said: 'The sofa cost me a fortune and it's irreplaceable because it is 50 years old. I still can't believe it.'

He said: ‘The sofa cost me a fortune and it’s irreplaceable because it is 50 years old. I still can’t believe it.’

‘She love eating shoes and trainers as a pub I never thought she’d progress on to my sofa. Maybe she is letting me know in no uncertain terms she wants a mate!

‘I have calmed down a bit now and I do love Sky so much. She is not in the dog house.

‘My kids are all grown up now so it’s just me and Sky. She will be getting lots of treats. 

‘She may be bonkers but she certainly keeps life interesting. I just need to keep her away from my sofas.’

Simon, of Cardiff, paid £1,700 for husky Sky when she was eight-weeks-old - but she soon began chewing up his house.

Pictured: Sky as a puppy

Simon, of Cardiff, paid £1,700 for husky Sky when she was eight-weeks-old – but she soon began chewing up his house