Premier League ace Jordon Ibe admits smashing his £130,000 Bentley 4×4 into a coffee shop

Premier League ace Jordon Ibe admits smashing his £130,000 Bentley 4×4 into a coffee shop causing damage worth £15,000 before leaving the scene but denies careless driving

  • Bournemouth midfielder pleaded guilty to failing to stop at scene of an accident 
  • He appeared at Bromley Magistrates’ Court in south London this morning 
  • The 23-year-old now faces trial at Bexley Magistrates’ Court on February 10 

Jordon Ibe (pictured outside Bromley Magistrates’ Court today) faces trial after denying dangerous driving 

Premier League star Jordon Ibe crashed his £130,000 Bentley 4×4 into a coffee shop, causing £15,000 worth of damage before leaving the scene, a court heard today.

The Bournemouth midfielder, 23, hit a Mercedes before smashing his white 4×4 Bentayga into The Pantry in Bromley, south London, causing around £15,000 damage on 30 July.

Ibe, who joined Bournemouth for a club record £15m from Liverpool in 2016, denied driving without due care but will plead guilty to failing to stop at the scene of an accident.

The player, who earns £38,000 a week, appeared at Bromley Magistrates’ Court wearing two silver and gold chains, and a navy blue v-neck jumper with a bumble bee logo on the left breast.

George Crickelli, prosecuting, said: ‘The defendant was driving a white Bentley at 4:50am.

‘The defendant was involved with a collision where his vehicle has left the road and collided with a parked car and crashed into the shop in front. He stayed there for a while before leaving the scene.

‘The Crown say that in respect of failing to stop the defendant’s actions did not meet the required behaviour for an accident scene.

Mr Ibe (pictured outside Bromley Magistrates' Court this morning) will go on trial in February next year

Mr Ibe (pictured outside Bromley Magistrates’ Court this morning) will go on trial in February next year 

‘He caused minor damage but had not left any details in hitting the shop, but in hitting the shop the front had to be removed from its foundations, he actually left part of the car in his shop.

‘He stated that he waited ten minutes before leaving, but members of the public called the police.

‘Police arrived within four minutes, he told police that he returned that day, however it was over ten hours later.

Ibe's car crashed into this coffee shop in Bromley, south London, which used to be called The Pantry

Ibe’s car crashed into this coffee shop in Bromley, south London, which used to be called The Pantry 

‘The owner of the Pantry shop that is actually damaged by the collision says the issue in dispute is she says in her statement says that she was in effect at the shop at midday the next day and no one had left a note with details.

Jonathan Morrisey, defending, said: ‘Mr Ibe continues to contend that he waited for a while at the scene and nobody arrived at the scene to exchange details, he will continue to deny that allegation.’

Ibe, who lives in Poole, Dorset, denied driving without due care and attention and indicated a guilty plea to failing to stop at the scene of an accident. He faces trial at Bexley Magistrates’ Court at 9:30am on February 10.

 

Orangutans communicate with a ‘language’ of 11 noises and various gestures

Kiss me squeak: Orangutans communicate using a ‘language’ of 11 noises and various gestures to tell others to ‘climb on me’, ‘stop that’ and ‘move away’, study finds

  • Researchers recorded more than 1,000 signals between 16 orangutans 
  • Found the apes communicate with ‘language’ of 11 vocal signals and 21 ‘gestures’
  • Adults use sounds and gestures in equal amounts but juveniles prefer physical

Orangutans have a primitive form of language which they use to communicate, a new study claims. 

Various sounds — including a ‘kiss squeak’, ‘raspberry’ and a ‘gorkum’ — have clearly defined meanings which are understood by the apes. 

Researchers from the University of Exeter found that wild Borneo orangutans can instruct another to ‘climb on me’, and also request to ‘climb on you’.

‘Resume play’ was another one of the remarks made by the orangutans, the scientists said. 

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Various sounds — including a ‘kiss squeak’, ‘raspberry’ and a ‘gorkum’ — have clearly defined meanings which are understood by the apes. A ‘language’ of 11 vocal signals and 21 ‘physical gestures’ were spotted from video footage. Pictured, two apes studied in the research 

WHAT SOUNDS DO ORANGUTANS USE?  

WHAT THE RESEARCHERS CALLED EACH SOUND
SOUND NAME   DESCRIPTION  
Kiss squeak A sharp kiss noise created on the inhale of air through trumpet-lips
Grumph A low vocalisation lasting 1–2 s made on the inhale 
Kiss squeak + grumph  A classic kiss squeak followed immediately after by a single grumph 
Gorkum  A classic kiss squeak followed by a series of multiple grumphs 
Complex call  A call created by the mixing and distorting of low guttural noises 
Grumble  Created by low, quick, repeating exhalation noises, similar in sound to a starting engine 
Squeak  A brief, high, and raspy vocalisation often made in bouts 
Throatscrape  A soft noise resembling a croak 
Raspberry  A voiceless vocalisation in which a faint spluttering noise is created on the exhalate 

A ‘language’ of 11 vocal signals and 21 ‘physical gestures’ was identified from video footage of 16 orangutans (seven mother-child pairs and a pair of siblings).

A grand total of 1,299 communicative signals – 858 vocal signals and 441 gestures – were seen, allowing the researchers to discern what they meant.  

Gestures included beckoning, stamping, pushing out a lower lip, shaking objects and ‘presenting’ a body part.

Vocalisations include a sharp kissing noise created while inhaling (kiss squeak), a low drawn out sound made during inhalation (grumph) and a kiss squeak followed by multiple grumphs – a sequence dubbed the gorkum. 

The apes were highly responsive to gestures and noises, reacting either before the sound had finished or less than a second afterwards in 90 per cent of instances.  

‘We observed orangutans using sounds and gestures to achieve eight different ‘goals’ – things they wanted another orangutan to do,’ said University of Exeter scientist Dr Helen Morrogh-Bernard, founder and co-director of the Bornean Nature Foundation (BNF).

The eight identified ‘goals’ of communication were: ‘acquire object’ (signaller wants something), ‘climb on me’, ‘climb on you’, ‘climb over’, ‘move away’, ‘play change: decrease intensity’, ‘resume play’ and ‘stop that’.

Dr Morrogh-Bernard adds: ‘Orangutans are the most solitary of all the apes, which is why most studies have been done on African apes, and not much is known about wild orangutan gestures.

A grand total of 1,299 communicative signals ¿ 858 vocal signals and 441 gestures - were seen between the Boreno orangutans in the study (pictured), allowing the researchers to discernhave an even split

A grand total of 1,299 communicative signals – 858 vocal signals and 441 gestures – were seen between the Boreno orangutans in the study (pictured), allowing the researchers to discern what they meant. Juvenile orangutans favour physical gestures of noises, whereas adults have an even split

‘We spent two years filming more than 600 hours of footage of orangutans in the Sabangau peat swamp forest in Borneo, Indonesia.

‘While some of our findings support what has been discovered by zoo-based studies, other aspects are new – and these highlight the importance of studying communication in its natural context.’

The research, published in International Journal of Primatology, found juvenile orangutans favour physical gestures of noises, whereas adults divvy it up equally. 

Touching was more commonly used when communicating with an orangutan that was not paying attention.

Vocal communication increased when the other orangutan was out of sight.  

WHAT ARE THE DIFFERENT SPECIES OF ORANGUTANS?

Until recently, scientists thought there were only two genetically distinct types of orangutan, Bornean and Sumatran.

But in 1997 biological anthropologist Erik Meijaard observed an isolated population of the great apes in Batang Toru, south of the known habitat for Sumatran orangutans.

Scientists began to investigate if it was a unique species.

Researchers studied the DNA, skulls and teeth of 33 orangutans killed in human-animal conflict.

They then concluded that they had discovered a new species, giving it the scientific name Pongo tapanuliensis or Tapanuli orangutan.

The newly discovered species numbers about 800 individuals and is critically endangered.

Dad-of-two retires at 24 after ‘banning his wife from Starbucks’

A father-of-two who retired aged just 24 has revealed how he managed to save $760,000 (£578,000) by curbing unnecessary spending, investing in rental properties and profiting from his own wedding.

Mike Rosehart, now 27, a former IT business analyst from Ontario, Canada,  shares two children with his wife Alyse, 28, and they were both able to quit their jobs after just seven years of work, aged 24 and 25 respectively. 

The entrepreneur, who now gives talks on how to save aggressively, says he first stumbled upon the idea when he read a book on retiring early during his time at the Ivey Business School in Ontario, Canada, in 2010.

He worked full time alongside studying, renting a cheap room and cycling everywhere, before buying a $152,000 (£115,000) cottage with Alyse aged 19 – with their savings and student loan.

Upon graduating in 2013 he invested the salary from his $42,000-a-year job (£31,000) in consulting in buying 10 properties in three years, with the couple choosing to live solely off Alyse’s $19,500-a-year graphic design salary.

In 2017 he and Alyse quit their jobs – with Mike’s boss insisting he was going through a ‘quarter-life crisis’ and predicting he would return – but the couple haven’t looked back since. 

Mike then sold their 11 properties and said that he had hit his ‘FIRE number’, having made 25 times his yearly living expenses. He insists anyone can achieve ‘FIRE’ (financial independence and retire early) – simply by ‘spending less, earning more and maximising the returns on the difference.’

Mike Rosehart, now 27, has revealed how he retired at 24 after saving $760,000 (£578,000) by curbing unnecessary spending, investing in rental properties and profiting from his wedding

Mike, a former IT business analyst from Ontario, shares two kids with wife Alyse, 28, and they were both able to quit their jobs after just seven years of work, aged 24 and 25 respectively

Mike, a former IT business analyst from Ontario, shares two kids with wife Alyse, 28, and they were both able to quit their jobs after just seven years of work, aged 24 and 25 respectively

The entrepreneur, who now gives talks on how to save aggressively, says he first stumbled upon the idea when he read a book on retiring early at the Ivey Business School in 2010

The entrepreneur, who now gives talks on how to save aggressively, says he first stumbled upon the idea when he read a book on retiring early at the Ivey Business School in 2010

Speaking to The Sun, he remembered how he began by persuading his wife to curb her spending, recalling: ‘Every time she bought Starbucks, I said: ‘That cost us two more days away from our kids.’ 

And the couple spent just $3,800 (£2,890) on their wedding in 2014, keeping the guest list to 80 people before using his credit card points to go to Brazil for their honeymoon – where they stayed for free in a friend’s house.

He said: ‘People give a gift when they come to a wedding and so we actually made a profit on our wedding if you think about it like that.

Mike insists that the hardest part of the ‘FIRE’ plan is to execute it, admitting that ‘most can’t resist a Starbucks, trip abroad or new cellphone’. 

He says: ‘Delayed gratification is the secret to FIRE.’ 

He worked full time alongside studying, renting a cheap room and cycling everywhere, before buying a $152,000 (£115,000) cottage with Alyse aged 19, using their savings and student loan

He worked full time alongside studying, renting a cheap room and cycling everywhere, before buying a $152,000 (£115,000) cottage with Alyse aged 19, using their savings and student loan

Upon graduating in 2013 he invested the salary from his $42k-a-year job (£31k) in consulting in buying 10 properties in three years, living off Alyse's $19,500-a-year graphic design salary

Upon graduating in 2013 he invested the salary from his $42k-a-year job (£31k) in consulting in buying 10 properties in three years, living off Alyse’s $19,500-a-year graphic design salary

And by 2017 he had hit his goal of saving $485,000 (£368k) to retire, having amassed $760,000 (£580k) in equity from the 11 properties he sold.

Upon quitting his job, his boss told him he would keep his job open, predicting Mike would return in six months -but he never did.

Although Mike admits he found retiring at 27 ‘a bit jarring’ at first, he now runs a YouTube channel giving business advice, as well as coaching others on how to achieve financial independence.  

Upon graduating in 2013 he invested the salary from his $42k-a-year job (£31k) in consulting in buying 10 properties in three years, living off Alyse's $19,500-a-year graphic design salary

Upon graduating in 2013 he invested the salary from his $42k-a-year job (£31k) in consulting in buying 10 properties in three years, living off Alyse’s $19,500-a-year graphic design salary

In 2017 he and Alyse quit their jobs - with Mike's boss insisting he was going through a 'quarter-life crisis' and predicting he would return, but the couple haven't looked back since

In 2017 he and Alyse quit their jobs – with Mike’s boss insisting he was going through a ‘quarter-life crisis’ and predicting he would return, but the couple haven’t looked back since

 

 

Queen spends a staggering ‘£30,000 on 620 gifts for family and staff’

Christmas is an expensive time for most people, including even the Queen it seems as she spends a staggering ‘£30,000 on 620 gifts for family and staff’, a former aide claims.

Her Majesty, 93, also sends 750 Christmas cards – which will usually feature a family photo – to relatives, friends, members of the Royal Household, and various British Commonwealth delegates. 

Speaking to Fabulous Digital, the source explained that up to two weeks before December 25, staff are told to go to one of the state rooms at Buckingham Palace to receive their presents from the Queen.

The Queen, 93, after she recorded her annual Christmas Day message in 2018, at Buckingham Palace in London

Her Majesty sends 750 Christmas cards - which will usually feature a family photo - to relatives, friends, Members of the Royal Household, and various British Commonwealth delegates. Pictured: The Queen's 1975 card

Her Majesty sends 750 Christmas cards – which will usually feature a family photo – to relatives, friends, Members of the Royal Household, and various British Commonwealth delegates. Pictured: The Queen’s 1975 card

They said: ‘Here they line up to receive a wrapped gift from the Queen, and she says a few words to each of them – usually something like “Thank you so much for all your help during the year”, followed by Happy Christmas.

‘The presents are usually a book token, or a small piece of china from the palace gift shop, and most years she gives them a small Christmas pudding in a box as well.’

If staff are unable to leave their duties on the specified days then the Household sends the presents to them along with a card from the monarch – which is signed by the Queen and Prince Philip.

A whopping 1,500 Christmas puddings, paid for through the Privy purse, are given to palace workers, staff in the Court Post Office and Palace police, according to the royal’s website.

The Prince of Wales, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, and the Duchess and Duke of Sussex arriving to attend the Christmas Day morning church service at St Mary Magdalene Church in Sandringham, Norfolk, in 2018

The Prince of Wales, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, and the Duchess and Duke of Sussex arriving to attend the Christmas Day morning church service at St Mary Magdalene Church in Sandringham, Norfolk, in 2018

The Queen explores the collection as she visits the new headquarters of the Royal Philatelic society on November 26, 2019 in London

 The Queen explores the collection as she visits the new headquarters of the Royal Philatelic society on November 26, 2019 in London

The aide claimed that the Queen used to enjoy a personal shopping session at Buckingham Palace before Christmas, but now the gifts are all chosen online by the monarch’s private secretary’s office.

Chosen stores – such as Harrods and Fortnum & Mason – would send ‘van loads of stuff to her look at’, which would be displayed on tables across two rooms at the palace. 

‘It was like her very own royal shopping mall. But it’s not done now, it’s one of those things that she doesn’t really need to expend her energy on as she gets older,’ the former aide claimed.

Meanwhile, the Duke of Edinburgh sends a further 200 cards at Christmas to different regiments and organisations close to him.

Royal Collection Trust members of staff put the finishing touches to a 15ft Christmas tree in the Crimson Drawing Room at Windsor Castle

Royal Collection Trust members of staff put the finishing touches to a 15ft Christmas tree in the Crimson Drawing Room at Windsor Castle

Buckingham Palace was contacted for comment by MailOnline and noted that Christmas gift details can be found on the Royal Household website.

They wouldn’t give any further guidance.

The revelations come after Sandringham: The Queen at Christmas, which aired this week on Channel 5, claimed that the royal family compete to buy one another the tackiest, silliest gifts over the festive period.

At 6pm precisely on Christmas Eve, the royals are called into Sandringham’s drawing room, where they have a ‘holy evening’ of gift giving and view the gifts as the ‘jokier the better’, the documentary revealed.

Over the years, the Queen has received a ‘Big Mouth Billie Bass’ the comical singing fish that hangs on walls, as well as a washing up apron as gifts from her family. 

Sydneysiders opt for high-fashion face masks to protect from the toxic bushfire smoke

Putting the ASH in fashion: Man casually strolls along Sydney street wearing a GIMP MASK to avoid toxic bush-fire smoke – as others get even MORE creative

  • Sydneysiders have been wearing unusual face masks to protect themselves from the blanket of toxic smoke 
  • ‘Bushfire selfies’ have swept social media, with residents keen to show off their fashionable breathing masks  
  • But some have been opting for simple hospital masks, which don’t properly protect from hazardous particles 

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With Sydney suffocating under a blanket of thick smoke, residents are taking extreme measures to protect themselves from the dangerous pollution.

But for many Sydneysiders, that’s no reason to forgo their fashion credentials – as the city became a catwalk for bizarre and creative face masks.

The ‘bushfire chic’ trend came as the thick smog continued to blow across the city from the raging Gospers Mountain fire north-west of the city, with the smoke likely to linger for days to come. 

Opting for a catwalk-ready look, this woman showcased an embellished mask which matched her customised denim jacket

Making sure she was Instagram-ready even as Sydney endured the suffocating smoke, this woman posed in a pale pink mask on social media

Making sure she was Instagram-ready even as Sydney endured the suffocating smoke, this woman posed in a pale pink mask on social media

Those preferring a very different look could take a leaf out of this Sydneysider's book after he was spotted in the CBD in a dramatic black mask that complemented the rest of his outfit

Those preferring a very different look could take a leaf out of this Sydneysider’s book after he was spotted in the CBD in a dramatic black mask that complemented the rest of his outfit

The NSW Environment Department said heavy smoke lingering in Sydney was expected to clear on Wednesday thanks to a ‘strong southerly’ wind.

But doctors have warned people can still suffer long-term health impacts from breathing in the ‘toxic’ layer of smog.

Last week, air pollution in the city reached such critical levels that breathing it was the equivalent of smoking an entire pack of cigarettes. 

Data from the NSW Environment Department show levels of PM2.5 – a particle so fine that humans inhale it into their bodies – had reached ‘hazardous’ levels.

This is the worst classification of air pollution, and poses an immediate risk to health.

A protester at Sydney's climate emergency rally combined a gas mask with a bong as he joined thousands of others to demand immediate action to fight bushfires

A protester at Sydney’s climate emergency rally combined a gas mask with a bong as he joined thousands of others to demand immediate action to fight bushfires 

This man, spotted in Bondi, opted for a strange orange face mask to match his colourful singlet as he took a walk outside in the smoke

This man, spotted in Bondi, opted for a strange orange face mask to match his colourful singlet as he took a walk outside in the smoke

Even a thick blanket of smoke couldn't stop this woman posing on Bondi Beach, using a selfie stick to get the perfect bushfire pic

Even a thick blanket of smoke couldn’t stop this woman posing on Bondi Beach, using a selfie stick to get the perfect bushfire pic

This group of young Sydney mates decided to wear matching masks for a festive party, enjoying glasses of wine as they protected themselves from the toxic haze

This group of young Sydney mates decided to wear matching masks for a festive party, enjoying glasses of wine as they protected themselves from the toxic haze

A group of young women crossing the road in Bondi also opted to protect themselves, making a rather unusual accessory decision to go with their swimsuits and tiny shorts

A group of young women crossing the road in Bondi also opted to protect themselves, making a rather unusual accessory decision to go with their swimsuits and tiny shorts

Keeping safe in the smoke

Children, the elderly and people with heart and lung conditions are most at risk.

To minimise the risk to your health, there are some steps you can take.

– Remain indoors with the windows closed

– Preferably stay in an air-conditioned building

– Reduce outdoor activities, including all school sports

– Cover your nose and mouth with a mask or damp cloth to reduce exposure to dust particles.

– Wear a P2 or P3 mask, which blocks even the finest particles if fitted correctly over the nose and mouth

– Seek medical advice if you feel ill

Some of the most extreme masks look like they came straight from a dystopian film, with one woman modelling a bright pink Hello Kitty face mask with bright pink breathing filters.

Experts said people looking for a mask need to opt for a P2 mask or stronger, which are the kind usually worn by builders.

Also known as a PT respirator, the mask is specially designed to filter out fine particles from the air, which can help stop them reaching the respiratory system.

The most dangerous particles carried by bushfire smoke, PM2.5, have a diameter of less than 2.5 micrometers, meaning they can only be detected with an electron microscope.

This means they are so small and light that they stay in the air for longer and can be easily inhaled by humans and animals – bypassing the nose and throat to penetrate deep into the lungs.

Respiratory diseases scientist Professor Brian Oliver said spending a day breathing this low-quality air is as bad as being a heavy smoker.

Numerous scientific studies have found a close link between exposure to fine particles and premature death from heart and lung disease.

They are also known to seriously affect chronic conditions including asthma, heart attack and bronchitis.

Sydneysiders have adopted a bizzare new selfie trend as bushfires raging across New South Wales push a hazardous smoke haze over the Harbour City

Sydneysiders have adopted a bizzare new selfie trend as bushfires raging across New South Wales push a hazardous smoke haze over the Harbour City

A woman commuting in Bondi chose a very colourful face mask to protect herself from the blanket of toxic smoke, with the most dangerous particles able to enter the respiratory system

 A woman commuting in Bondi chose a very colourful face mask to protect herself from the blanket of toxic smoke, with the most dangerous particles able to enter the respiratory system

This man opted for a basic hospital mask, which is not known to protect wearers from the most dangerous pollutant particles

This man opted for a basic hospital mask, which is not known to protect wearers from the most dangerous pollutant particles