Soaring waistlines hit record levels in Britain amid obesity crisis

Britain’s expanding waistlines hit record levels as women’s increase by up to THREE inches on average and men’s by two inches in 24 years

  • Women’s waists grew three inches in 24 years and men’s are two inches bigger
  • Experts warned that many more of us are overweight than we were in the past
  • But data published by NHS Digital reveals impact this is having on waist sizes
  • Pick up tomorrow’s Daily Mail for a 16-page guide on losing a stone for summer

Waistline measurements have stretched to record levels as the obesity crisis takes hold, figures reveal.

Women’s waists grew an average of three inches in 24 years and men’s are nearly two inches bigger – increasing the risk of heart disease, cancer and diabetes, data shows.

Experts have long warned that many more of us are overweight than we were in the past.

But data published by NHS Digital reveals the impact this is having on English waist sizes – a better marker of health than weight or body mass index (BMI) alone.

Women’s waists grew an average of three inches in 24 years and men’s are nearly two inches bigger 

BMI does not differentiate between muscle and fat, whereas extra inches around the waist suggest fat surrounding crucial organs.

Yesterday, a report showed hospital admissions due to obesity soared by almost 100,000 last year – 15 per cent more than in 2017 – as experts warned fat patients put an intolerable strain on the NHS.

And the World Health Organisation last year found the UK had the third biggest obesity problem of 53 European nations, with 29 per cent of women and 27 per cent of men obese. 

The figures, ranging from 1993 to 2017, show at the latest count that the average waist size of an adult English woman was a record 35.2 inches – up from 32.2 inches 24 years previously. Men had an average waist of 38.5 inches in 2017 – up from 36.7 in 1993.

Experts said obesity has become so normal that clothes have increased in size so Britons do not know they are getting fatter.

And every extra inch on the waistline raises the odds of bowel cancer by 3 per cent, even if the rest of your body is trim. Tam Fry, of the National Obesity Forum, said: ‘The figures for both men and women are very concerning – and if either have a waist measurement over half their height they should get a grip on their lifestyle.’

Victoria Taylor, senior dietitian at the British Heart Foundation, said combining BMI and waist size gives a ‘more comprehensive’ view of body weight and fat distribution.

UNO players of the card game shocked after little-known rule is shared online

‘You cannot stack Draw 2 and Draw 4 cards’: UNO reveals the little-known rule that will change the way you play the game forever

  • Playing UNO has been a past time favourite for families all over the world
  • But it turns out we might have been playing the card game wrong our entire lives 
  • UNO confirmed when a player puts down a +4 card, you can’t put any card down
  • The player must pick up four cards, and their turn is skipped until the next round

 It’s a classic card game that makes or breaks family and friends everywhere.

And now UNO has revealed a little-known rule about the ‘Draw 4 Wild Card’ that’s set to change the way you play the game forever.

Turns out we might have been playing the card game wrong our entire life.

In a now-viral tweet on Twitter, UNO confirmed when a player puts down a +4 card, you must draw 4 and your turned is skipped – talk about a wild card!

‘You can’t put down a +2 to make the next person Draw 6. We know you’ve tried it,’ Uno said, sparking a heated debate among loyal players.

‘You cannot stack Draw 2 and Draw 4 cards.’

Playing UNO has been a family favourite for decades. But it turns out we might have been playing the card game wrong our entire lives (stock image)

In a now-viral tweet on Twitter, UNO confirmed when a player puts down a +4 card, you must draw 4 and your turned is skipped - talk about a wild card!

In a now-viral tweet on Twitter, UNO confirmed when a player puts down a +4 card, you must draw 4 and your turned is skipped – talk about a wild card!

The rule has sparked a heat debate among players, with many struggling to accept the change

The rule has sparked a heat debate among players, with many struggling to accept the change

How does the Draw 4 Wild Card works

Players are not allowed to stack Draw 2 and Draw 4 cards.

If someone puts down a +4 card, you must draw 4 and your turn is skipped. You can’t put down a +2 to make the next person Draw 6.

One man asked: ‘What about a +4 on a +4?’, to which UNO bluntly responded: ‘No.’

Another player asked: ‘But can you add a Draw 2 to a Draw 2?’, to which UNO responded: ‘No.’

Many avid UNO players were shocked by the revelation, with some saying they will continue to play by their own rules.

‘This is a completely valid move and the only sure way to assert your dominance at the table,’ UNO said.

The latest rule comes just months after avid UNO player LaToya McCaskill Stallings, from Houston, decided to look through the game’s official rules after she ran out of things to read at home

Upon reading, the teacher discovered players are only allowed to play the ‘Draw 4 Wild Card’ if they have no other playable cards in your hand.

LaToya McCaskill Stallings made a game-changing discovery about the 'Draw 4 Wild Card'

LaToya McCaskill Stallings made a game-changing discovery about the ‘Draw 4 Wild Card’

‘So it’s taken me 35 years on this earth to realise that I’ve been playing UNO wrong since I was a kid,’ the school teacher said in a Facebook post.

‘Did y’all know that you can only play the Draw 4 Wild card if you have no other cards of the same color that can be played??!

‘And if you suspect that someone has illegally played this card, they have to show you their hand. And if they in fact played the card illegally they must draw 4, but If not, the person who challenged the play must DRAW 6?

‘Okay so I was bored and ran out of things to read so I decided to read the actual rule book.’

The woman shared the game-changing post in early 2018 but it was doing the rounds on social media earlier this year.

The teacher discovered that you are only allowed to play the Wild Draw 4 card if you have no other playable cards in your hand - talk about a wild card! The woman shared the game-changing post in early 2018 but was making the rounds on social media earlier this year

The teacher discovered that you are only allowed to play the Wild Draw 4 card if you have no other playable cards in your hand – talk about a wild card! The woman shared the game-changing post in early 2018 but was making the rounds on social media earlier this year

‘Questioning my whole life now. Am I even f***ing playing go fish right?!’ one person commented.

Another wrote: ‘When I first played it with my husband’s family, I was told this! I get called out all the time because they think I’m cheating.’

Another said: ‘Well damn I been playing wrong. But I’m not switching it up.’

One wrote: ‘This could save my game life. I always end up with 35 cards in my hand.’

And another posted: ‘We read this too when we were playing over Christmas but decided we don’t like the rule so ignored it!’

Nutritionist answers the THREE most common questions she’s asked

An Australian nutritionist has addressed three of the most common questions she’s asked by clients after noticing three key topics during a recent Instagram Live session. 

Jessica Sepel, one of Australia’s leading holistic nutrition experts, is known for her successful blog and JS Health Vitamin range and regularly answers questions on social media. 

And three of the most persistent questions include how to eat healthy while out, how to manage premenstrual syndrome symptoms naturally and how to eat well while travelling overseas. 

Jessica Sepel (pictured), one of Australia’s leading holistic nutrition experts, is known for her successful blog and JS Health Vitamin range and regularly answers client questions

What should you drink when you are out? 

When it comes to alcohol, the best options to choose are one or two glasses of wine or clear spirits with soda or even kombucha. 

Cocktails are fun and delicious but are usually filled with sugary cordials or syrups so keep these to a minimum. 

 

QUESTION ONE

If you have to eat out, what are the better options?

Ms Sepel recommends never turning up to a social event or restaurant feeling hungry as this is when you’re more likely to select less nutritious options and over-do it.

‘Enjoy a small snack one to two hours beforehand – we love protein balls, a boiled egg or seed crackers with cottage cheese or hummus,’ she said.

Ms Sepel recommends never turning up to a social event or restaurant feeling hungry as this is when you're more likely to select less nutritious options and over-do it

'Enjoy a small snack one to two hours beforehand - we love protein balls, a boiled egg or seed crackers with cottage cheese or hummus,' she said

Ms Sepel recommends never turning up to a social event or restaurant feeling hungry as this is when you’re more likely to select less nutritious options and over-do it

‘When eating out, opt for grilled, roasted or steamed methods of cooking as opposed to fried, tempura and crumbed. You can also ask for a side salad or a side of steamed greens to help reach your veggie intake for the day.’

Ms Sepel also stresses the importance of not depriving yourself. 

‘If you are craving pizza, then go ahead,’ she said.

‘Something else you can try is asking someone if they want to share, that way you get to taste a few things. You could enjoy a pizza/pasta and a salad/greens and then you’re getting the best of both worlds.’ 

‘When eating out, opt for grilled, roasted or steamed methods of cooking as opposed to fried, tempura and crumbed,’ she said

What other ways can you manage PMS? 

* No dairy before and during your period. I also recommend swapping to organic versions of dairy when you do eat it. People seem to have less hormonal issues with organic dairy compared to conventional.

* No refined sugar at all. I also suggest to be cautious with your fruit intake too – I recommend 2 fruits a day and preferably low sugar versions. 

* Vitamins (under guidance of a health practitioner) B6, magnesium citrate or dyglicinate and primrose oil/fish oil. 

* No more than 1 coffee/day – caffeine can really trigger PMS and period pain/cramps. 

* Ensure you get enough essential fatty acids in your diet – oily fish, walnuts, seeds, fish oil supplements, flaxseeds, olive oil, eggs, dark leafy greens.

* Do not drink alcohol before and during your period. Keep alcohol to a treat on the weekends and my golden rule is no more than 2 drinks at a time.

QUESTION TWO

How do you naturally manage PMS symptoms?

Some of the primary PMS symptoms are abdominal pain and cramps which can often be caused by inflammation.

According to Ms Sepel, anti-inflammatory foods such as berries, pineapple, turmeric, oily fish, avocado, nuts, seeds, extra virgin olive oil and dark green leafy veggies can ease the symptoms as well as upping your intake of magnesium and calcium. 

‘Research suggests that the mineral magnesium is worth considering when it comes to painful periods as it can help to relax the uterine muscles and reduce levels of the hormones involved in pain and inflammation,’ Ms Sepel said.

‘Focus on including magnesium rich foods like avocado, wholegrains (oats, buckwheat, wild rice), nuts and seeds, beans, dark leafy greens, bananas, raspberries, figs and raw cacao.

‘Increasing your dietary calcium intake in conjunction with magnesium can also be beneficial and there are lots of sources including yoghurt, unhulled tahini, broccoli, sardines and tinned salmon, sesame seeds, tempeh, brazil nuts, and almonds.’

She also recommends lowering stress triggers where possible and practising self-care strategies like listening to music, walking and reading.  

‘Please keep in mind that when it comes to PMS it is always worth checking in with your health practitioner for some personalised advice and support,’ she added.

Ensure you get enough essential fatty acids in your diet - oily fish, walnuts, seeds, fish oil supplements, flaxseeds, olive oil, eggs, dark leafy greens - before and during your period

Ensure you get enough essential fatty acids in your diet – oily fish, walnuts, seeds, fish oil supplements, flaxseeds, olive oil, eggs, dark leafy greens – before and during your period 

What should you eat/avoid on a plane? 

* Stick to the grilled protein (chicken/fish/beef) option with the veggies/rice.

* Avoid the pasta/potato dishes Enjoy the side salad  but avoid the dressing and ask for olive oil and lemon juice instead.

* Avoid the bread roll and dessert on the plate –  instead have some dark chocolate. 

* Avoid the juices/sodas/cordials and enjoy sparkling water with lemon/herbal tea. 

* Avoid alcohol on the plane – my biggest rule! It can really make you feel awful when you land! 

 

QUESTION THREE 

How do you eating healthy while travelling?

While many struggle to relax their health regimes, Ms Sepel there is no better time than a holiday to ease up a little on restriction.

‘I can’t emphasise enough, that holidays and travelling are for enjoyment, experiences and making life-long memories. How can you focus on building these when you’re feeling guilty about which foods you’re eating?’ She said. 

‘Don’t completely let go of routine but allow yourself to indulge and enjoy the eating experience.’

Ms Sepel suggests avoiding drinking alcohol on the plane and on the first day of thr trip to reduce the adverse effects of jet-lag. 

While many struggle to relax their health regimes, Ms Sepel there is no better time than a holiday to ease up a little on restriction

While many struggle to relax their health regimes, Ms Sepel there is no better time than a holiday to ease up a little on restriction

She also says to ease up on intense workouts in favour of walking to destinations.  

‘It’s a great way to explore the city, plus the added bonus of saving money on transport. What about organising a hike? Don’t forget to take snacks to your daily activities e.g. something easy to grab from the buffet breakfast or from a local supermarket,’ she said.

‘This is to avoid not eating for an extended period of time which can result in overdoing it when you finally do sit down for a meal. A bag of nuts, fruit, carrots or hummus are all easy to take and can be munched on wherever you are.

‘Lastly, keep hydrated! This is especially important if you’re in a hot location and doing a lot of physical activity.’

How Meghan Markle’s outing with royal baby contrasts to Kate Middleton’s

The Duke and Duchess of Sussex have made their first appearance with their newborn son following his birth on Monday.

New mother Meghan, 37, looked radiant as she posed for photos in the grand St George’s Hall at Windsor Castle alongside proud father Harry, 34.

Meghan’s low key appearance in front of a small group of journalists stands in stark contrast to that of sister-in-law Kate and Princess Diana, with both royals appearing on the hospital steps of the Lindo Wing just hours after giving birth. 

Speaking to Femail, etiquette expert William Hanson noted the low-key nature of the ‘big reveal’ is in keeping with the Sussexes’ desire for greater privacy – and could set a precedent for future royal births. 

He said: ‘The more controlled, more private nature of this afternoon’s ‘big reveal’ is in-keeping with the couple’s wishes to have a less intense post-birth circus than with Prince Harry’s brother Prince William and sister-in-law the Duchess of Cambridge.  

New mother Meghan, 37, looked radiant as she posed for photos with baby Archie in the grand St George’s Hall at Windsor Castle alongside proud father Harry, 34

In July 2013, proud new parents Kate and William introduced their first son, Prince George, to the world, with the Duchess opting for a blue spotted Jenny Packham dress

In July 2013, proud new parents Kate and William introduced their first son, Prince George, to the world, with the Duchess opting for a blue spotted Jenny Packham dress

Diana left the Lindo Wing in a floaty turquoise polka dot dress, with a white trim on the collar when she gave birth to Prince William in 1982

Diana left the Lindo Wing in a floaty turquoise polka dot dress, with a white trim on the collar when she gave birth to Prince William in 1982

‘Although it is far less exciting for members of the public and the media, it may even set a new precedent for future royal babies. No one can deny the grandeur of St George’s Hall topping a hospital steps in Paddington.’

He continued: ‘Baby Sussex, as we are currently unofficially terming the child, is not going to be a direct heir to the throne and so the child, and family in general, can be afforded more privacy. 

‘I think why some media commentators are annoyed with the more controlled and restrained press coverage is only because we have recently had three royal babies where the parents and children have been very much in the public eye – and that is only due to the future roles of The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge.’

Kate, 36, opted for a bespoke Jenny Packham shift dress in red with a white lace collar, when she showed off Prince Louis for the first time on the steps of the Lindo Wing in April 2018.  

Speaking to Femail, etiquette expert William Hanson noted the nature of the 'big reveal' is in keeping with the Sussexes' desire for greater privacy

Speaking to Femail, etiquette expert William Hanson noted the nature of the ‘big reveal’ is in keeping with the Sussexes’ desire for greater privacy

The world was given the first glimpse of newborn Archie Harrison Mountbatten-Windsor, pictured, this afternoon

The world was given the first glimpse of newborn Archie Harrison Mountbatten-Windsor, pictured, this afternoon

The Duke and Duchess of Sussex beamed with pride as they introduced their son Archie to the world

The Duke and Duchess of Sussex beamed with pride as they introduced their son Archie to the world

Harry and Meghan strolled out into the hall where photographers were waiting to snap photos

Harry and Meghan strolled out into the hall where photographers were waiting to snap photos

The Duke and Duchess of Sussex with their baby son, who was born on Monday morning

The Duke and Duchess of Sussex with their baby son, who was born on Monday morning

After she gave birth to Prince Harry in 1984, Princess Diana emerged wearing a long red coat by Jan van Velden, with a white blouse trimmed with a scarlet ribbon showing underneath. 

And it wasn’t the first time that Kate gave a nod to her late mother-in-law with her choice of maternity outfit. 

The Duchess stepped out in a bespoke polka dot crepe de chine dress, also by Jenny Packham, after giving birth to Prince George in July 2013.

Within hours of her appearance on the steps of the Lindo Wing, similar dresses by Jenny Packham had sold out.

The Duchess of Cambridge wore a bespoke red shift dress by Jenny Packham with a white lace collar when she left the Lindo Wing, after giving birth to Prince Louis in April 2018

The Duchess of Cambridge wore a bespoke red shift dress by Jenny Packham with a white lace collar when she left the Lindo Wing, after giving birth to Prince Louis in April 2018

After she gave birth to Prince Harry in 1984, Princess Diana emerged wearing a long red coat by Jan van Velden, with a white blouse trimmed with a scarlet ribbon showing underneath, teamed with matching red shoes

After she gave birth to Prince Harry in 1984, Princess Diana emerged wearing a long red coat by Jan van Velden, with a white blouse trimmed with a scarlet ribbon showing underneath, teamed with matching red shoes 

And the dress was very similar to the polka dot number Diana wore to leave the Lindo Wing, when she also became a first-time mother in 1982. 

Kate’s last appearance on the steps of the Lindo Wing caused controversy, with commentators and royal fans claiming her impeccable appearance was unrealistic and put ‘ridiculous pressure’ on new mothers to look perfect.  

In a red Jenny Packham dress and with her hair perfectly styled, she posed for three minutes with newborn Prince Louis.  

The Duchess of Cambridge wore a buttercup yellow sprigged Jenny Packham dress, and her trusty nude court shoes, when she left the Lindo Wing with Princess Charlotte in May 2015

The Duchess of Cambridge wore a buttercup yellow sprigged Jenny Packham dress, and her trusty nude court shoes, when she left the Lindo Wing with Princess Charlotte in May 2015

One in 20 people in England have been aggressively harmed by a drunk person over the past year

One in 20 people in England have been ‘aggressively harmed’ by a drunk person over the past year, research suggests.

A study found 4.6 per cent of 5,000 people surveyed reported being hurt, ‘sexually forced’ or physically threatened as a result of someone else’s drinking.

And one in five claimed to have endured ‘minor harms’ over the past 12 months, according to the largest poll of its kind.

Minor harms included being kept awake, made to feel uncomfortable at social gathering or forced to call the police due to someone else’s inebriation. 

Researchers warn the harmful effects of alcohol are ‘prevalent’ and even ‘trivial’ disturbances can impact our ‘health and quality of life’ over time. 

One in 20 have been ‘aggressively harmed’ by a drunk person over the past year (stock)

The research was carried out by Public Health England and led by Dr Caryl Beynon, of the risk factors intelligence team.

‘This is the largest ever survey of [alcohol-related harms to others] conducted within the UK, and the first national study in England,’ the researchers wrote in the journal BMJ Open.

‘It is clear [alcohol-related harm to others] is relatively prevalent and some individuals experience harm frequently. 

‘The most prevalent harms could be considered insignificant, but even apparently minor harms such as sleep disruption can have an impact on health and quality of life, particularly if experienced persistently.’

The damaging effects of alcohol are well known, with excess drinking being responsible for six per cent of deaths in 2012, the researchers wrote.

Studies into alcohol’s dangers have been almost entirely focused on the drinker, with less attention being paid to how it affects their loved ones, colleagues or society as a whole. 

But in just over half of all violent crimes, the victim perceives the offender as being under the influence of alcohol, statistics show. And nearly 10,000 alcohol-related road traffic accidents took place between 2013 and 2015. 

The World Health Organization’s global alcohol strategy highlights the need to investigate how liquor impacts people aside from the drinker. 

These effects have been investigated in Wales, Scotland and Ireland, however, this is the first time it has been studied in England. 

The researchers looked at three months’ worth of data collected via the Alcohol Toolkit Survey, which gets sent to different households across the UK every month.

Some 4,874 survey responders were asked 18 questions on whether they had been negatively affected by someone else’s drinking in the past year.

This included whether they had been involved in a serious, but non-violent, argument; put at risk in a car; or been let down by someone they were counting on. 

They were also asked who was responsible for the incidents, such as a partner, housemate or stranger, and how often they occurred.  

Graph shows the percentage of people who have come to harm, such as being kept awake or physically threatened, over the past year in England as a result of someone else's drinking

Graph shows the percentage of people who have come to harm, such as being kept awake or physically threatened, over the past year in England as a result of someone else’s drinking

Results revealed the most commonly reported harm was being kept awake (eight per cent), followed by feeling anxious or uncomfortable at a social event (nearly seven per cent).

When it came to being sexually forced or pressured, a victim’s partner was responsible in up to nearly 40 per cent of cases. And 19 per cent of respondents said they had experienced this harm at the hands of a stranger.   

Overall, friends and strangers were found to be the most likely to impose any kind of drinking-related harm, making up around half (46 per cent) of cases. 

And people were more than twice as at risk if they were heavy drinkers themselves.

In nearly three quarters of cases (74.8 per cent), these harmful incidents occurred less than once a month. However, some reported them as taking place daily or almost every day.

Young, white British people were found to be more at risk of coming to harm than other ages or ethnic groups. People of minority ethnic groups have been found to have higher rates of abstinence from alcohol.

Having a disability, being educated or living in private rented accommodation also raised the odds. 

Evidence has shown being disabled increases a person’s risk of physical and sexual violence, as well as financial hardship. 

Why education affects our risk is unclear, however, people who rent may represent ‘more transitory, poor and vulnerable population which increases their risk of harm’, the researchers wrote.

Perhaps surprisingly, being male or female did not affect a person’s risk of being harmed by someone else’s drinking. 

This is despite studies suggesting women are more likely to experience sexual assault, while men are more at risk of having their property damaged, regardless of whether or not the offender had been drinking. 

The study did find, however, having children in the home or being retired lowered the risk.  

The researchers concluded: ‘Policies that focus on alcohol must take into consideration the impact of drinking on those other than the drinker.’

They stress, however, they were asking people to recall events that happened up to a year ago. The household survey also missed out homeless people or those in care homes, who may be affected by alcohol differently. 

Future studies should look at how different drinking habits increase another person’s risk of harm, the researchers claim.  

DO YOU DRINK TOO MUCH ALCOHOL? THE 10 QUESTIONS THAT REVEAL YOUR RISK

One screening tool used widely by medical professionals is the AUDIT (Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Tests). Developed in collaboration with the World Health Organisation, the 10-question test is considered to be the gold standard in helping to determine if someone has alcohol abuse problems.

The test has been reproduced here with permission from the WHO.

To complete it, answer each question and note down the corresponding score.

YOUR SCORE:

0-7: You are within the sensible drinking range and have a low risk of alcohol-related problems.

Over 8: Indicate harmful or hazardous drinking.

8-15: Medium level of risk. Drinking at your current level puts you at risk of developing problems with your health and life in general, such as work and relationships. Consider cutting down (see below for tips).

16-19: Higher risk of complications from alcohol. Cutting back on your own may be difficult at this level, as you may be dependent, so you may need professional help from your GP and/or a counsellor.

20 and over: Possible dependence. Your drinking is already causing you problems, and you could very well be dependent. You should definitely consider stopping gradually or at least reduce your drinking. You should seek professional help to ascertain the level of your dependence and the safest way to withdraw from alcohol.

Severe dependence may need medically assisted withdrawal, or detox, in a hospital or a specialist clinic. This is due to the likelihood of severe alcohol withdrawal symptoms in the first 48 hours needing specialist treatment.