Jeremy Corbyn supporters are duped into calling him unfit for office

A Jewish activist organisation has duped Jeremy Corbyn fans into calling him unfit for office by making them believe comments said by the Labour leader about Jews were actually made by Boris Johnson.

The video made by the Israel Advocacy Movement shows Labour supporters being presented with the Labour leader’s controversial comments about Jewish people – but they are told they were said by Mr Johnson

After they all claim that Mr Johnson should be forced to stand down, the filmmaker reveals the comments were actually made by Mr Corbyn.

The revelations cause a mix of reactions, with some expressing shock and disgust, while others ask for the filmmaker to stop recording.

The Israel Advocacy Movement describes itself as an organisation which  ‘aims to establish a “mass movement” of Israeli advocates through training and mobilising a network of passionate supporters of Israel’ and says it’s mission is to ‘counter the increasing hostility Israel is suffering at the hands of the British public’. 

The filmmaker repeats controversial statements he claims were made by Mr Johnson, before then asking them if he should still be allowed to run for office

The two accusations of anti-Semitism that tricked Corbyn fans into deeming him unfit for office

Below are the two questions posed to Corbyn supporters by the filmmaker, in which he deliberately attributes the accusations to Boris Johnson instead.

Question one: Boris Johnson is on record describing an author who described the Jewish people as a peculiar and ugly race that was behind every war in Europe and every movement on capital, he described that author as “brilliant” if “controversial” in his time. Does that surprise you?

This question refers Mr Corbyn’s endorsement of a century-old book suggesting banks were controlled by the Jews.

The Labour leader wrote the foreword for a new edition of JA Hobson’s Imperialism: A Study, in which the author argues European finance was controlled ‘by men of a single and peculiar race’.

In 2011, Mr Corbyn called the book a ‘great tome’, a quote used by the filmmaker and attributed to Mr Johnson in a bid to trick Corbyn supporters taking part.

Question two: ‘Boris Johnson invited someone to parliament who said that Jews drink the blood of Christian children. Not only did he invite them to parliament, Boris Johnson described them as an “honoured citizen”. Does that surprise you?’

This second question concerns Mr Corbyn’s association with hate preacher Sheikh Raed Salah.

In 2015, a video surfaced of Mr Corbyn referring to Salah as an ‘honoured citizen’ and even inviting him to tea in the House of Commons. 

Salah, a prominent member of the Islamic Movement in Israel, was excluded from the UK because of concerns over his ‘virulent anti-semitism’.

In 2011, he was able to slip through border control at Heathrow and give a number of speeches before he was arrested on the orders of the Home Secretary.

Salah served two years in prison for raising millions of pounds for the Palestinian terror group Hamas. 

Among the controversies used to trick supporters in the video is Mr Corbyn’s endorsement of a century-old book suggesting banks were controlled by the Jews.

The Labour leader wrote the foreword for a new edition of JA Hobson’s Imperialism: A Study, in which the author argues European finance was controlled ‘by men of a single and peculiar race’.

In 2011, Mr Corbyn called the book a ‘great tome’, a quote used by the filmmaker and attributed to Mr Johnson in a bid to trick Corbyn supporters taking part.

One shocked supporter replies: Well, what can I say? I don’t know much about it but the Jews have got a lot of power and a lot of money, haven’t they?

‘They do manipulate things; power is money.’ 

Another supporter, after expressing shock at the revelation, asks: ‘Is that true? I mean, I still think vote Labour.’

The filmmaker then asks another supporter about a recent poll that found 50 per cent of British Jews would think about leaving the UK if Corbyn was elected. 

She says: ‘Where are they going to go, to Palestine? Why are they scared of him? Because they’ve got off-shore accounts and they don’t want to pay tax.’ 

It comes after Mr Corbyn rejected claims he has made Labour a ‘refuge’ for anti-Semites today amid renewed accusations the party has failed to deal with the issue.

Lawyers for the Jewish Labour Movement (JLM) said 70 Labour staffers past and present have given sworn testimony into an official inquiry by the Equalities and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) into anti-Semitism in the party.

According to a leaked copy of its submission to the inquiry, the JLM said Labour was ‘no longer a safe space’ for Jewish people or those who stood up against anti-Semitism.

‘Since Jeremy Corbyn became leader of the Labour Party, he has made the party a welcoming refuge for anti-Semites,’ it said.

‘He has done that in a number of ways including by publicly supporting anti-Semites and anti-Semitic tropes. The Labour Party is cast in his image.’

Asked about the claims during an election campaign visit to Peterborough, the Labour leader said: ‘I completely reject that.’

He said: ‘When I became leader of the party there were no processes in place to deal with anti-Semitism.

The Jewish Labour Movement has made a formal submission to the EHRC in which it claims Labour under Mr Corbyn, pictured in Nottingham yesterday, has tried to deny that it has a problem with anti-Semitisim

The Jewish Labour Movement has made a formal submission to the EHRC in which it claims Labour under Mr Corbyn, pictured in Nottingham yesterday, has tried to deny that it has a problem with anti-Semitisim

‘We introduced an appeals procedure to deal with it and we introduced an education process, so that party members understood the hurt that can be caused by anti-Semitic remarks or anti-Semitic behaviour.

‘I think we’ve got processes in place that have improved it a great deal.’

James Libson, a partner at the Mishcon de Reya law firm representing the JLM, said their submission included evidence of interference by the leader’s office in internal investigations into complaints of anti-Semitism.

‘There are many, many outstanding complaints, many examples of interference and many examples of double standards in the way in which complaints are processed,’ he told the BBC Radio 4 Today programme.

‘There has been interference and that interference has unfortunately become institutional.

‘Institutional in the sense that people affiliated with the leader’s office – and now in the actual unit that are investigating – and that at a more basic level, information is passing between the leader’s office and investigating unit.’

The EHRC announced in May that it was launching a formal investigation into the party after receiving a number of complaints relating to allegations of anti-Semitism.

Jeremy Corbyn, pictured at a campaign event in Peterborough today, and the Labour Party are under investigation by the Equality and Human Rights Commission

Jeremy Corbyn, pictured at a campaign event in Peterborough today, and the Labour Party are under investigation by the Equality and Human Rights Commission

Its remit is to determine whether unlawful acts have been committed by the party or its employees, and whether Labour responded to complaints in a ‘lawful, efficient and effective manner’.

It followed persistent complaints by Jewish groups that anti-Semitism had been allowed to flourish within the Labour ranks since Jeremy Corbyn became leader in 2015.

The leadership subsequently acknowledged that it was too slow to respond to the concerns, but insisted that new measures have been put in place to deal with complaints more effectively.

The issue erupted into the General Election campaign last week, when the Chief Rabbi Ephraim Mirvis warned that ‘a new poison sanctioned from the top’ had taken root in the party, and questioned Mr Corbyn’s fitness for office.

The Labour leader faced further criticism after he repeatedly refused to apologise during an interview with the BBC’s Andrew Neil – although he later did so during an appearance this week on ITV.

Boris Johnson says failure to get Brexit done has broken trust in politics

Boris Johnson today hammered home his message about ‘getting Brexit done’ – and gave a ‘cast iron’ guarantee the NHS will not be on the table in a trade deal with the US.

Appearing on ITV’s This Morning, the PM appealed for voters to give him a majority on December 12 so the country can ‘move on’.

Asked if he had an issue with people not trusting him, Mr Johnson said: ‘I think there is a big trust issue with the whole of politics at the moment because after three and a half years we haven’t got done what we said we would do.’ 

He dismissed Labour ‘scare stories’ that the NHS could form part of a trade agreement with the US after Brexit.  

With just a week to go until the country goes to the polls, Mr Johnson has set out a whirlwind schedule for his first 100 days.

He has vowed to fast-track laws to toughen sentences for serious criminals, restrict strikes affecting vital services such as health and transport and ban ‘vexatious’ claims against military veterans.

The PM also said that cross-party talks to agree ‘an enduring solution to the challenge of social care’ would start within his first 100 days. 

Appearing on ITV’s This Morning, the PM appealed for voters to give him a majority on December 12 so the country can ‘move on’

And he pledged a law requiring migrants to pay a £625 surcharge to cover the cost of NHS care. 

Mr Johnson announced that his new government would hold its first Budget in February, to include a fuel duty freeze which will financially benefit 37million motorists.

Tory sources confirmed measures would also include an increase in the national insurance threshold from £8,632 to £9,500 – delivering a tax cut worth £104 to more than 30million workers.

There are also rumours that the Tories will extend free childcare provision, with 15 hours for two-year-olds. Currently up to 30 hours is available for three and four-year-olds. The proposal was considered for the manifesto, but eventually left out. 

The PM also said that cross-party talks to agree ‘an enduring solution to the challenge of social care’ would start within his first 100 days. And he pledged a law requiring migrants to pay a £625 surcharge to cover the cost of NHS care (pictured at Red Bull Racing in Milton Keynes on Wednesday)

The PM also said that cross-party talks to agree ‘an enduring solution to the challenge of social care’ would start within his first 100 days. And he pledged a law requiring migrants to pay a £625 surcharge to cover the cost of NHS care (pictured at Red Bull Racing in Milton Keynes on Wednesday)

The PM and the US president posed for the cameras as he arrived at the country house hotel in Hertfordshire where the gathering was held

The PM and the US president posed for the cameras as he arrived at the country house hotel in Hertfordshire where the gathering was held

The Prime Minister also confirmed that Britain would leave the EU on January 31 if he wins a majority next week.

With just a week to go before what Mr Johnson described as ‘the most important election in a generation’, the Prime Minister set out a detailed prospectus for changing Britain. He said his blueprint for power contrasted sharply with that of Jeremy Corbyn, who has pledged to spend his first three months in office negotiating a new Brexit deal before staging a second referendum in which he will sit on the fence.

The Labour leader has also opened the door to a second referendum on Scottish independence, which Nicola Sturgeon has named as her price for putting him into No 10. 

Mr Johnson said: ‘In just seven days’ time the British people will have to choose between a working majority government or yet another gridlocked hung Parliament. 

‘If there is a Conservative majority next week, we will get Brexit done by the end of January. 2020 will then be the year we finally put behind us the arguments and uncertainty over Brexit.

‘We will get Parliament working on the people’s priorities.

‘But if the Conservatives don’t get a majority, then on Friday 13th we will have the nightmare of a hung Parliament with Jeremy Corbyn as prime minister propped up by Nicola Sturgeon’s SNP.

‘Next year will be Groundhog Day in Parliament with MPs arguing every day about the referendum and businesses and families left in limbo, unable to plan their futures.’

Boris Johnson speaks while holding a Greggs sausage roll on the platform of Milton Keynes train station, after a visit at Red Bull Racing in Milton Keynes on Wednesday

Boris Johnson speaks while holding a Greggs sausage roll on the platform of Milton Keynes train station, after a visit at Red Bull Racing in Milton Keynes on Wednesday

In an interview with ITV’s Peston show last night, the PM insisted that Brexit would be ‘over’ after January 31, despite the fact the UK will remain aligned with the EU during a transition period lasting until the end of the year.

‘What will happen is that the parliamentary agony will be over, and the political agony will be over, and the misery and tedium and procrastination will be over,’ he said.

Mr Johnson, who has ruled out extending the transition period, suggested it could even be cut, saying: ‘If we choose at any stage from January to come out of the transition period, that is up to us.’

Tory strategists are anxious to drag the political debate back on to the election, following days in which it has been dominated by the fallout from the London Bridge terror attack and Donald Trump at the Nato summit in the UK.

They are also concerned that voters are ‘losing focus’ on the contest following a string of polls giving the Conservatives a substantial lead. A new Ipsos-Mori poll yesterday revealed that, with just a week to go, the NHS has overtaken Brexit as the voters’ top priority – giving Labour hope it can confound the polls in the closing days of the campaign.

The NHS was named as a key issue by 59 per cent of voters, against 56 per cent who wanted action on Brexit.

Mr Johnson’s 100-day plan will see Parliament asked to approve a legislative blitz in the New Year, following a Queen’s Speech on December 19.

The EU Withdrawal Act, which enshrines Mr Johnson’s Brexit deal in law, would be brought back to Parliament before Christmas, with MPs asked to push it through in time for the January 31 deadline. Tory sources pointed out that, unlike the last Parliament, all 635 Conservative candidates have pledged to vote for the deal.

Tory sources said that by March 22 the Government would have introduced legislation to prepare the UK for Brexit, including the framework for an Australian style points-based immigration system.

Mr Johnson will also legislate to toughen sentences for terrorists and serious violent criminals, along with new laws to end the ‘witch hunt’ against military veterans. 

And he will pass laws to lock in planned funding increases for health – to legally guarantee an extra £33.9bn a year for the NHS by by 2023 – and education, with extra funding to give schools at least £5,000 per secondary pupil and £4,000 per primary pupil.

The increase in the national insurance threshold is viewed as a ‘down payment’ on broader manifesto plans to raise it in line with the income tax threshold at £12,500. This would produce a tax cut totalling £464 per person, but no schedule has been set out for delivering it in full.

Other priorities include getting plans underway to roll out gigabit-capable broadband across the UK, and laying the foundations for a new national fishing strategy. 

There will also be a law requiring unions to keep ‘minimum service levels’ during strikes on vital public services, such as the current dispute on South Western Railways. 

Four Brexit Party MEPs are set to QUIT and urge voters to back Boris Johnson

Four Brexit Party MEPs including Annunziata Rees-Mogg are set to QUIT and urge voters to back Boris Johnson as Nigel Farage faces huge revolt

  • Four Brexit Party MEPs are set to quit this morning and urge voters to back Tories
  • John Longworth and Annunziata Rees-Mogg are among the group resigning
  • Move comes just a week before election and as Nigel Farage faces BBC grilling 

Nigel Farage voiced fury today as he faced a Brexit Party mutiny today with four MEPs set to quit and urge voters to back Boris Johnson at the election.

The dramatic resignations are set to be announced with just a week to go before polling day – and just before Mr Farage records a high-profile interview with the BBC‘s Andrew Neil. 

Party sources told MailOnline they expected John Longworth, the former British Chambers of Commerce chief, to deliver the blow alongside Annunziata Rees-Mogg.

Lance Forman and Lucy Harris are also set to resign, although all four will continue to sit as independent MEPs. Mr Longworth had the whip removed yesterday for allegedly voting in favour of Mr Johnson’s divorce package in the European Parliament. 

Mr Farage said he was ‘disappointed’ and dismissed the idea that the Brexit Party was risking a Jeremy Corbyn government. A spokesman also pointed to close ties between the rebels and senior Tories – including Ms Rees-Mogg’s brother Jacob.   

The news will fuel fears of a complete meltdown, with deep splits over whether to go all-out against the Tories on December 12 or endorse the PM’s deal with the EU. 

Nigel Farage is facing a Brexit Party mutiny today with four MEPs set to quit and urge voters to back Boris Johnson at the election

Party sources told MailOnline they expected John Longworth, the former British Chambers of Commerce chief, to deliver the blow alongside Annunziata Rees-Mogg (pictured)

Mr Longworth had the whip removed yesterday for allegedly voting in favour of Mr Johnson’s divorce package in the European Parliament

Brexit Party sources told MailOnline they expected John Longworth (right), the former British Chambers of Commerce chief, to deliver the blow alongside Annunziata Rees-Mogg (left)

Mr Farage said: ‘We are disappointed that four of our MEPs don’t seem to understand that we both saved the Conservative party from large scale losses to the Liberal Democrats in the South and South West of England but we are also hammering the Labour Leave vote in its traditional heartlands making it much easier for the Conservatives to win many of those seats. 

‘The only vote on the Leave side that is currently being split is in areas such as Barnsley, the South Wales Valleys, Doncaster and Hartlepool where there is a risk that the Tories will split our vote.’  

A Brexit Party spokesman added: ‘We also note that one of the MEPs is the sister of a Cabinet Minister, another has a partner who works in the office of the same Cabinet Minister and yet another is a personal friend of both Boris Johnson and Michael Gove. 

‘In the case of John Longworth, who was for years the firmest advocate of WTO withdrawal that we have ever met, he underwent a metamorphosis into being a supporter of the new EU treaty following two days of meetings in London.’

Mr Johnson today renewed his commitment to get Brexit done, saying he would stick to the January 31 departure date and the transition period will not last beyond 2020. 

The Brexit Party opposes the deal in principle and has ordered all MEPs to vote against it, claiming it is not ‘real Brexit’.

Mr Longworth is a member of a committee which was yesterday ordered to vote in secret in the European Parliament in Brussels.

But he has refused to say which way he cast his ballot on the issue. 

Mr Farage dramatically pulled candidates from more than 300 seats that were won by the Conservatives in 2017, saying he did not want to split the Eurosceptic vote and hand victory to Labour.

But he insisted the party will still fight Labour constituencies, arguing they are best placed to win in Leave-leaning Northern heartlands.     

Mr Johnson (pictured on ITV's Peston last night) has renewed his commitment to get Brexit done, saying he would stick to the January 31 departure date and the transition period will not last beyond 2020

Mr Johnson (pictured on ITV’s Peston last night) has renewed his commitment to get Brexit done, saying he would stick to the January 31 departure date and the transition period will not last beyond 2020

Boris Johnson’s top adviser Dominic Cummings is crowned the world’s WORST dressed man by GQ

Boris Johnson‘s right-hand man has topped British GQ’s list of the world’s worst-dressed men.

Dominic Cummings, the Prime Minister’s top political adviser, is well-known for sporting his favourite blue and navy quilted gilet over more formal work attire.

With a love of sports hoodies, jeans and fleece vests, the magazine suggests the British political strategist, 48, stands out for all the wrong reasons.

Meanwhile Hollywood starlet Timothée Chalamet, 23, who is famed for his bold outfits on the red carpet, was crowned the best dressed men in the world by the publication. 

Dominic Cummings, the Prime Minister’s top political adviser, is well-known for sporting a blue and navy quilted gilet (pictured underneath his coat). He was named worst-dressed by GQ

Timothee Chalamet (pictured), who is famed for his bold outfits on the red carpet, was crowned the best dressed men in the world by the publication

Timothee Chalamet (pictured), who is famed for his bold outfits on the red carpet, was crowned the best dressed men in the world by the publication

BEST DRESSED MEN OF 2019 

1. Timothee Chalamet

2. Brad Pitt

3. Lil Nas X

4. David Beckham

5. Skepta

6. Keanu Reeves

7. Exo’s Kai

8. Troye Sivan

9. Tyler The Creator

10. Alton Mason

WORST DRESSED MEN OF 2019

1. Dominic Cummings

2. Mark Zuckerberg

3. Xi Jinping, Chinese president

4. Dan Bilzerian

5. David Solomon

6. Cristiano Ronaldo

7. Jacob Rees-Mogg

8. Maha Vajiralongkorn, King of Thailand

9. Neymar, Brazilian footballer

10. Donald Trump 

Mr Cummings led the Vote Leave campaign to victory in the 2016 referendum, before being asked to join Mr Johnson’s new administration in Downing Street.

He has been credited with masterminding the Prime Minister’s scorched earth approach to Brexit negotiations.

The strategist also grabbed headlines when he sacked an adviser to chancellor Sajid Javid, whom he suspected of leaking government information.

Mr Cummings beat Facebook chief executive Mark Zuckerberg and Chinese President Xi Jinping, who took second and third place respectively, in the magazine’s top 10 worst dressed men.

Mr Cummings beat Facebook chief executive Mark Zuckerberg (pictured) who took second place in the magazine's top 10 worst-dressed

MP Jacob Rees-Mogg (pictured) was seventh worst dressed man

Mr Cummings beat Facebook chief executive Mark Zuckerberg (pictured left) who took second place in the magazine’s top 10 worst-dressed. MP Jacob Rees-Mogg (right) was seventh

The list also featured footballer Cristiano Ronaldo (pictured) in sixth

US President Donald Trump was placed at 10th

The list also featured footballer Cristiano Ronaldo (pictured left) in sixth and US President Donald Trump (pictured right) in 10th

The list also featured footballer Cristiano Ronaldo in sixth, Conservative MP Jacob Rees-Mogg in seventh and US President Donald Trump in 10th.  

But at the other end of the scale, Call Me By Your Name actor Timothee, 23, beat stars such as Brad Pitt, David Beckham and Skepta to bag the number one best dressed spot.

The magazine named 50 men that have conquered the sartorial landscape, including rapper Lil Nas X, Keanu Reeves, Kai, Troye Sivan, Tyler The Creator and Alton Mason.

Chalamet made headlines around the world earlier this year when he sported a pale grey belted silk and satin suit by Haider Ackermann to the premiere of The King at the Venice Film Festival.

A few weeks later he wore a custom Louis Vuitton sequinned hoodie by Virgil Abloh to the film’s premiere in London.

Brad Pitt (pictured) came second on the best-dressed list and was praised for his old Hollywood appeal

David Beckham came fourth

Meanwhile, Brad Pitt (pictured left) came second on the best-dressed list and was praised for his old Hollywood appeal. David Beckham (right) came fourth

Tyler The Creator (pictured in November 2019) was awarded ninth place in the best-dressed list for his fashion prowess

Tyler The Creator (pictured in November 2019) was awarded ninth place in the best-dressed list for his fashion prowess

The magazine said: ‘Plenty of actors decide to take risks on the red carpet, and for that we applaud them, but so often it backfires.

‘Not so with Timothee Chalamet, who wears the trickiest of designer ensembles but manages to look as cool and comfortable as if he were wearing regular black tie.

‘A lot of this is to do with his androgynous, skinny physique and startlingly pretty face.’

Pitt came second on the list and was praised for his old Hollywood appeal, as displayed in his latest Quentin Tarantino film.

Lil Nas X (pictured at the American Music Awards this year on the red carpet ) came third on the list

Lil Nas X (pictured at the American Music Awards this year on the red carpet ) came third on the list

The magazine said: ‘Once Upon A Time In… Hollywood, itself a kind of lament to a bygone age of movie magic, shows us how an American icon should dress: T-shirt and jeans, cowboy boots, aviator sunglasses, baseball caps and Hawaiian shirts.

‘It’s at once rugged and masculine, but also friendly and approachable, all slung on with that characteristic nonchalance and ease.

‘Therein lies the magic and charm of Brad Pitt, both on the red carpet and off it: the golden boy from a golden era, the likes of which we may never see again.’

Lil Nas X came third on the list, while Beckham came fourth and Skepta fifth. 

The full feature is in the January/February 2020 issue of British GQ, available via digital download and newsstands on December 6. 

Labour grandee Lord Falconer urges Jeremy Corbyn to quit if he loses next week

Labour grandee Lord Falconer yesterday warned that Jeremy Corbyn should not try to cling on as leader if the party loses the election.

He challenged union chief Len McCluskey’s claim that he should stay on to allow Labour a ‘period of reflection’.

The former lord chancellor said Mr Corbyn should resign quickly and be replaced by an ‘alternative prime minister’ ready to lead the fightback if Boris Johnson wins.

It marks the opening salvo in a new Labour power struggle between pro and anti-Corbyn factions in the event of a defeat next Thursday.

In an interview with the Daily Mail, Lord Falconer – one of the few to have served in Tony Blair’s cabinet and Mr Corbyn’s front bench team – also said the Labour leader’s ‘wrong’ Brexit stance and lack of ‘competence’ were big vote losers in its heartlands.

He said the party should not have sidelined Remainers and would-be leaders Sir Keir Starmer and Emily Thornberry, and said its next leader did not have to be a woman – even though it had never been led by a female.

Labour grandee Lord Falconer (pictured in 2017) yesterday warned that Jeremy Corbyn should not try to cling on as leader if the party loses the election

Jeremy Corbyn with hairdresser Charlotte Wilkins at Windwood Heights Retirement Village in Nottingham, while on the General Election campaign trail on Wednesday

Jeremy Corbyn with hairdresser Charlotte Wilkins at Windwood Heights Retirement Village in Nottingham, while on the General Election campaign trail on Wednesday

Shadow foreign secretary Emily Thornberry

Shadow Brexit secretary Keir Starmer

Lord Falconer said the party should not have sidelined Remainers and would-be leaders Sir Keir Starmer (right) and Emily Thornberry (left)

Mr McCluskey said earlier this week that Mr Corbyn should not copy Ed Miliband, who plunged Labour into chaos when he resigned days after losing to David Cameron in 2015.

His comments were seen by some as an attempt to make it easier for one of two leading pro-Corbyn MPs – Rebecca Long-Bailey and Laura Pidcock – to succeed him. 

One Labour source said Mr Corbyn’s allies want him to stay until the party’s conference in September to give the two hard-Left candidates time to gain enough experience to mount a serious challenge. 

Left-wing magazine fails to back Labour 

The New Statesman – the bible of the Left – has refused to back a Labour government for the first time in its 106-year history.

In a devastating intervention, the magazine branded Jeremy Corbyn ‘unfit to be prime minister’. Its leader column said both Mr Corbyn and Boris Johnson are ‘profoundly unpopular’ and their ‘moral integrity has been compromised’ by events in their pasts.

The journal said that ‘many voters despair at the choice before them’. It argued the Tories’ ‘weaknesses and divisions’ meant Labour had a huge opportunity and praised the party for putting forward a ‘bold manifesto’.

But it concluded: ‘The essential judgment that must be made is on Mr Corbyn himself. 

His reluctance to apologise for the anti-Semitism in Labour and to take a stance on Brexit, the biggest issue facing the country, make him unfit to be prime minister.’

The magazine declined to endorse the Liberal Democrats, with the party accused of having shown ‘little intellectual ambition’.

‘Yet for the reasons outlined, we have resolved to endorse no party at this general election,’ it said.

Arguing that ‘voters deserve better’ it urged people to vote tactically next week to deprive Mr Johnson of a majority to scupper his plans for a ‘hard Brexit’.

Otherwise, it would favour the more experienced soft-Left contenders such as Sir Keir, Miss Thornberry, Angela Rayner and Jess Phillips.

Lord Falconer, 68, who stressed he still hoped Labour would triumph next week, said: ‘If we win and form a government, well and good. If we lose, we cannot afford as a party to be staring at our navel. We have to be on the pitch with an alternative prime minister.

‘If we don’t win, we need to choose a new leader as quickly as we reasonably can.’

Asked if pressure from Mr Corbyn’s supporters for him not to throw in the towel immediately was designed to boost the prospects of Miss Long-Bailey and Miss Pidcock, he told the Mail Plus ‘Order, Order’ podcast: ‘I don’t know, but I note Len McCluskey said there should be a period of reflection before we decide what to do. I just don’t think we can do that.

‘We are going to have to choose a leader who is ready.’ He said it could take until March to stage a leadership election, but ‘we cannot afford to be looking in on ourselves because so much is happening in the country’.

Lord Falconer added: ‘This election is not one where everyone can sit back and decide what is going to happen over the next decade. We will be back in parliament straightaway making decisions about the future.’

He said there would be massive changes affecting the economy, Brexit and other issues as soon as the election was over and Labour owed it to its supporters to have a strong leader in place.

Lord Falconer also disputed Corbyn allies’ claims that Labour’s next leader must be a female on the grounds it has never had one – unlike the Tories, who have had two female prime ministers.

The argument is seen by some as a means of boosting the prospects of the two pro-Corbyn frontrunners, while hindering those of the most high-profile anti-Corbyn contender, Sir Keir. 

Mr McCluskey (pictured at BBC Broadcasting House last month) , who heads Labour's biggest paymaster Unite, agreed with Lord Falconer that the party had to tackle 'very real issues' with Brexit and Mr Corbyn's leadership in its heartlands

Mr McCluskey (pictured at BBC Broadcasting House last month) , who heads Labour’s biggest paymaster Unite, agreed with Lord Falconer that the party had to tackle ‘very real issues’ with Brexit and Mr Corbyn’s leadership in its heartlands

The Labour leader doing arts and crafts during a visit to Winwood Heights Retirement Village in Nottingham on Wednesday

The Labour leader doing arts and crafts during a visit to Winwood Heights Retirement Village in Nottingham on Wednesday

Lord Falconer said the solution was to guarantee that if the next leader is male, he has a female deputy.

‘We have to have a woman in the leadership team,’ he said, ‘by which I mean leader or deputy leader. We could have two women but not two men.

Chairman refuses 15 times to answer for miners’ union cash 

Labour’s chairman refused 15 times to explain why the National Union of Mineworkers had paid off his mortgage.

Ian Lavery was confronted by Michael Crick from Mail+ about why he had received £165,000 from the NUM which included payment towards his mortgage and a redundancy payment when he became an MP in 2010.

It came days after he featured in a campaign video by Labour that accused the Tories of ‘stealing the miners’ pension fund’.

It criticised how, when the coal industry was privatised in 1994, it was agreed that if there was surplus in the Mineworkers’ Pension Scheme it would be shared between its members and the Government.

Mr Crick asked him whether he had ‘a bit of a cheek’ doing the video given the money he had received from the NUM. And he asked: ‘Couldn’t that money have been better spent on miners welfare?’ Mr Lavery replied: ‘Instead of coming here making this personal, concentrate on what the Labour Party have got to offer.’

A 2017 report from the Certification Office, which regulates unions, showed that he was lent £72,500 by the NUM benevolent fund to buy a property. It was written off in 2007. It added that Mr Lavery, the former general secretary of the NUM’s Northumberland branch, and his wife kept £18,000 from an endowment policy on the property.

The report also showed that Mr Lavery received union ‘termination payments’ of £89,887 when he left to become an MP. It said the union overpaid him £30,600 but, after a dispute, he volunteered to repay only £15,000. 

‘That means it is possible for a man to become leader if the party thinks he’s the best man for the job.’ 

Lord Falconer said Mr Corbyn should have shared the election limelight with other key figures. ‘Labour is a broad church and the broader the church of people presenting Labour policies the better,’ he said.

‘We haven’t seen much of Emily Thornberry or Keir Starmer. They are impressive performers and it would have been good to see them.’

He added: ‘In the North and Midlands there is real concern about our Brexit policy and Jeremy Corbyn. That comes up a lot on the doorstep… and there are issues of competence.’

Lord Falconer said he feared Labour was in trouble even in strongholds such as veteran MP Dennis Skinner’s Bolsover in Derbyshire. 

‘Things might change but people are voting now (in postal votes),’ he said.

Asked if it was too late for Mr Corbyn to win outright, he replied: ‘I’m hopeful, but that’s what the pollsters are saying.

‘Because we lost pretty well all our seats in Scotland in 2015 it is harder and harder for us to get a majority.

‘In these divided times where Brexit is such an issue for so many traditional Labour voters, we have got quite a struggle.

‘I am very worried that heartland Labour voters who always voted Labour in the past may not now see us as the absolute place they will go to – and the reason for that is Brexit.’

Lord Falconer said that despite his criticisms, he remained ‘totally committed to Labour’. A Corbyn victory would be ‘better for communities, keeping the UK together and having close relations with Europe,’ he added.

Mr McCluskey, who heads Labour’s biggest paymaster Unite, agreed with Lord Falconer that the party had to tackle ‘very real issues’ with Brexit and Mr Corbyn’s leadership in its heartlands. 

He said Leave-voting seats in the North and Midlands were its ‘Achilles heel’.

But unlike Lord Falconer, he insisted that Mr Corbyn should not walk out immediately as leader, arguing: ‘There should be a period of reflection so there is not a knee-jerk reaction to blame A B C D or E.’