Trump says AGAIN that COVID will disappear, citing declining new cases in Florida, Texas and Arizona

President Donald Trump has highlighted declining new coronavirus cases and hospitalizations in former hotspots Florida, Texas and Arizona, asserting that the pandemic ‘will disappear’ – even as deaths topped 2,000 in 24 hours for the first time since May. 

Trump said at a press conference on Friday night at his golf club in New Jersey that the pandemic ‘is disappearing,’ adding, ‘It will disappear.

‘In the US, more than 80 percent of jurisdictions report declining cases. We’re doing very well, you don’t hear that often in the media,’ he continued. 

It was unclear how Trump was defining ‘jurisdictions,’ but coronavirus deaths are still rising in 23 states, while cases are increasing in 20 states, according to a Reuters analysis comparing data from the past two weeks to the previous two.

‘We have a very large country, a very complex country. More than half of America’s counties report fewer than 20 cases last week,’ Trump said. ‘We’re doing very well but we have to remain vigilant.’

President Donald Trump has highlighted declining new coronavirus cases and hospitalizations in former hotspots Florida, Texas and Arizona, asserting that the pandemic ‘will disappear’

 

‘The southern states that were a very strong hotspot not long ago — Arizona, Texas, and Florida continue to show significant improvement, including increased availability of hospital beds,’ Trump said. Indeed, all three states have shown declining new cases and hospitalizations for the past several weeks.

‘Arizona now has the smallest number of coronavirus inpatients since mid-June,’ Trump continued. ‘Texas is stabilizing and improving rapidly.’

‘Florida is also stabilizing, its statewide positive test rate continues to decrease, from 13 percent on July 23 to 8 percent this week. Florida has done very well,’ Trump said. ‘Even Miami, which was the hottest spot in Florida, is heading down very rapidly.’

Trump said his administration is ‘carefully monitoring California’s Central Valley, as well as San Diego, Los Angeles, Sacramento and San Francisco, which are starting to stabilize and go down.’

He said that several regions where cases are on the rise, including Boston, Chicago and the Midwest, are being carefully monitored.

‘ It’s vital that all Americans work together to protect the most vulnerable,’ Trump said. ‘Approximately half of all deaths have occurred in nursing homes and long term care facilities.’

It came as Dr Anthony Fauci warned there is ‘trouble ahead’ for some cities if they don’t act now to stop the spread.   

Deaths in the US exceeded the grim 160,000 mark on Friday, which is nearly a quarter of the global COVID-19 death toll. The number of positive cases across the US is now at nearly 4.9 million.  

The US added 2,060 deaths in 24 hours as of 8.30pm on Thursday, AFP reported, citing the Johns Hopkins University live tally. The last time the US recorded more than 2,000 deaths in a 24-hour period was on May 7.  

Deaths have increased by 10,000 in just nine days. On a per-capita basis, the US now ranks 10th highest in the world for both cases and deaths. 

Coronavirus deaths are still rising in 23 states, while cases are increasing in 20 states, according to a Reuters analysis comparing data from the past two weeks to the previous two.  

Many of the new deaths have come from the hotspot states of California, Florida and Texas, which are also the top three states for total cases. 

While infections appear to be declining in those states, new outbreaks are emerging coast-to-coast. 

White House coronavirus task force coordinator, Dr Deborah Birx, warned this week that the cities of Boston, Chicago, Detroit and Washington could face outbreaks due to an uptick in the percentage of coronavirus tests coming back positive. 

 

 

Following her warning, fellow task force member Dr Anthony Fauci said on Thursday: ‘This is a predictor of trouble ahead.’ 

Fauci was asked on CNN about Birx’s comments identifying new areas of concern in major cities, even as authorities see encouraging signs across the South.  

Even in cities and states where most people are doing things right, Fauci said, a segment of people not wearing masks or following social distancing remains vulnerable to infection and can keep the virus smoldering in US communities.

‘Unless everybody pulls together, and gets the level way down over baseline, we’re going to continue to see these kind of increases that Dr Birx was talking about in several of those cities,’ Fauci said.

Public health experts have in recent days sent regular warnings to cities and states not to relax anti-coronavirus measures too much before the virus is under sufficient control.

On average, 1,000 American are dying each day from COVID-19. 

President Donald Trump, in contrast, has played down the staying power of the virus, saying on Wednesday ‘it will go away like things go away’ as he urged US schools to reopen on time for face-to-face lessons.

Fauci has also said children should be sent back to class as soon as possible.

It comes as a new forecast predicted the US death toll would almost double by the end of the year but 70,000 lives could be saved if everyone wears a mask.  

The University of Washington’s Institute for Health Metrics revised its death toll forecast on Thursday to predict nearly 300,000 deaths by December 1.

Researchers say that 70,000 lives could be saved if 95 percent of Americans wear masks from today when they leave their homes.  

IHME Director Dr Christopher Murray acknowledged there appears to be fewer transmissions of the virus in the hotspot states of Arizona, California, Florida and Texas but said deaths are rising and will continue to rise for the next week or two.

CHICAGO: In Chicago, there are an average of 294 new cases and two deaths every day. As of Thursday, there were 62,797 cases of COVID-19 and 2,798 deaths among Chicago residents

CHICAGO: In Chicago, there are an average of 294 new cases and two deaths every day. As of Thursday, there were 62,797 cases of COVID-19 and 2,798 deaths among Chicago residents

WASHINGTON: The total number of positive cases in Washington DC is now at 12,589 and deaths are at 589

WASHINGTON: The total number of positive cases in Washington DC is now at 12,589 and deaths are at 589

BOSTON: In Boston, the number of infections has now reached 14,323 and the death toll is at 735

BOSTON: In Boston, the number of infections has now reached 14,323 and the death toll is at 735

DETROIT: In Detroit, there have have been 12,914 confirmed cases and 1,493 deaths

DETROIT: In Detroit, there have have been 12,914 confirmed cases and 1,493 deaths

He put the drop in infections down to a combination of local mandates for mask use, bar and restaurant closures and more responsible behavior by the public. 

‘The public’s behavior had a direct correlation to the transmission of the virus and, in turn, the numbers of deaths,’ Murray said. 

‘Such efforts to act more cautiously and responsibly will be an important aspect of COVID-19 forecasting and the up-and-down patterns in individual states throughout the coming months and into next year.

‘We’re seeing a rollercoaster in the United States.

‘It appears that people are wearing masks and socially distancing more frequently as infections increase, then after a while as infections drop, people let their guard down and stop taking these measures to protect themselves and others – which, of course, leads to more infections. And the potentially deadly cycle starts over again.’  

Murray said that based on cases, hospitalizations and deaths, several states are seeing increases in the transmission of COVID-19, including Colorado, Idaho, Kansas, Kentucky, Mississippi, Missouri, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, and Virginia.

‘These states may experience increasing cases for several weeks and then may see a response toward more responsible behavior,’ Murray said. 

The University of Washington's Institute for Health Metrics revised its death toll forecast on Thursday to predict nearly 300,000 deaths by December 1. Researchers say that 70,000 lives could be saved if 95 percent of Americans wear masks from today when they leave their homes

The University of Washington’s Institute for Health Metrics revised its death toll forecast on Thursday to predict nearly 300,000 deaths by December 1. Researchers say that 70,000 lives could be saved if 95 percent of Americans wear masks from today when they leave their homes

Coronavirus US: Death toll exceeds 160,000 with 4.9m cases

The United States has recorded more than 2,000 COVID-19 deaths in a 24-hour period as the death toll surpassed 160,000 and Dr Anthony Fauci warned there is ‘trouble ahead’ for some cities if they don’t act now to stop the spread.   

Deaths in the US exceeded the grim 160,000 mark on Friday, which is nearly a quarter of the global COVID-19 death toll. The number of positive cases across the US is now at nearly 4.9 million.  

The US added 2,060 deaths in 24 hours as of 8.30pm on Thursday, AFP reported, citing the Johns Hopkins University live tally. The last time the US recorded more than 2,000 deaths in a 24-hour period was on May 7.  

Deaths have increased by 10,000 in just nine days. On a per-capita basis, the US now ranks 10th highest in the world for both cases and deaths. 

Coronavirus deaths are still rising in 23 states, while cases are increasing in 20 states, according to a Reuters analysis comparing data from the past two weeks to the previous two.  

Deaths in the US exceeded the grim 160,000 mark on Friday, which is nearly a quarter of the global COVID-19 death toll, after increasing by 10,000 in just nine days

Many of the new deaths have come from the hotspot states of California, Florida and Texas, which are also the top three states for total cases. 

While infections appear to be declining in those states, new outbreaks are emerging coast-to-coast. 

White House coronavirus task force coordinator, Dr Deborah Birx, warned this week that the cities of Boston, Chicago, Detroit and Washington could face outbreaks due to an uptick in the percentage of coronavirus tests coming back positive. 

Following her warning, fellow task force member Dr Anthony Fauci said on Thursday: ‘This is a predictor of trouble ahead.’ 

Fauci was asked on CNN about Birx’s comments identifying new areas of concern in major cities, even as authorities see encouraging signs across the South.  

Even in cities and states where most people are doing things right, Fauci said, a segment of people not wearing masks or following social distancing remains vulnerable to infection and can keep the virus smoldering in US communities.

‘Unless everybody pulls together, and gets the level way down over baseline, we’re going to continue to see these kind of increases that Dr Birx was talking about in several of those cities,’ Fauci said.

The number of positive cases across the US is now at nearly 4.9 million

The number of positive cases across the US is now at nearly 4.9 million

Many of the new deaths have come from the hotspot states of California, Florida and Texas, which are also the top three states for total cases. While infections appear to be declining in those states, new outbreaks are emerging coast-to-coast

Many of the new deaths have come from the hotspot states of California, Florida and Texas, which are also the top three states for total cases. While infections appear to be declining in those states, new outbreaks are emerging coast-to-coast

Public health experts have in recent days sent regular warnings to cities and states not to relax anti-coronavirus measures too much before the virus is under sufficient control.

On average, 1,000 American are dying each day from COVID-19. 

President Donald Trump, in contrast, has played down the staying power of the virus, saying on Wednesday ‘it will go away like things go away’ as he urged US schools to reopen on time for face-to-face lessons.

Fauci has also said children should be sent back to class as soon as possible.

It comes as a new forecast predicted the US death toll would almost double by the end of the year but 70,000 lives could be saved if everyone wears a mask.  

The University of Washington’s Institute for Health Metrics revised its death toll forecast on Thursday to predict nearly 300,000 deaths by December 1.

Researchers say that 70,000 lives could be saved if 95 percent of Americans wear masks from today when they leave their homes.  

IHME Director Dr Christopher Murray acknowledged there appears to be fewer transmissions of the virus in the hotspot states of Arizona, California, Florida and Texas but said deaths are rising and will continue to rise for the next week or two.

CHICAGO: In Chicago, there are an average of 294 new cases and two deaths every day. As of Thursday, there were 62,797 cases of COVID-19 and 2,798 deaths among Chicago residents

CHICAGO: In Chicago, there are an average of 294 new cases and two deaths every day. As of Thursday, there were 62,797 cases of COVID-19 and 2,798 deaths among Chicago residents

WASHINGTON: The total number of positive cases in Washington DC is now at 12,589 and deaths are at 589

WASHINGTON: The total number of positive cases in Washington DC is now at 12,589 and deaths are at 589

BOSTON: In Boston, the number of infections has now reached 14,323 and the death toll is at 735

BOSTON: In Boston, the number of infections has now reached 14,323 and the death toll is at 735

DETROIT: In Detroit, there have have been 12,914 confirmed cases and 1,493 deaths

DETROIT: In Detroit, there have have been 12,914 confirmed cases and 1,493 deaths

He put the drop in infections down to a combination of local mandates for mask use, bar and restaurant closures and more responsible behavior by the public. 

‘The public’s behavior had a direct correlation to the transmission of the virus and, in turn, the numbers of deaths,’ Murray said. 

‘Such efforts to act more cautiously and responsibly will be an important aspect of COVID-19 forecasting and the up-and-down patterns in individual states throughout the coming months and into next year.

‘We’re seeing a rollercoaster in the United States.

‘It appears that people are wearing masks and socially distancing more frequently as infections increase, then after a while as infections drop, people let their guard down and stop taking these measures to protect themselves and others – which, of course, leads to more infections. And the potentially deadly cycle starts over again.’  

Murray said that based on cases, hospitalizations and deaths, several states are seeing increases in the transmission of COVID-19, including Colorado, Idaho, Kansas, Kentucky, Mississippi, Missouri, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, and Virginia.

‘These states may experience increasing cases for several weeks and then may see a response toward more responsible behavior,’ Murray said. 

The University of Washington's Institute for Health Metrics revised its death toll forecast on Thursday to predict nearly 300,000 deaths by December 1. Researchers say that 70,000 lives could be saved if 95 percent of Americans wear masks from today when they leave their homes

The University of Washington’s Institute for Health Metrics revised its death toll forecast on Thursday to predict nearly 300,000 deaths by December 1. Researchers say that 70,000 lives could be saved if 95 percent of Americans wear masks from today when they leave their homes

Fauci says US has the worst COVID-19 outbreak in the world

Dr Anthony Fauci says the ‘numbers don’t lie’ when it comes to coronavirus in the United States and acknowledged that the country has the worst COVID-19 outbreak in the world.

Fauci, who is a member of the White House’s coronavirus task force, said that the US has ‘quantitatively’ suffered from the COVID-19 pandemic as the country averages nearly 60,000 new cases and 1,000 deaths per day. 

His comments came during an interview on Wednesday with CNN‘s Dr Sanjay Gupta at a virtual Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health forum.

When asked if the US had suffered the worst globally given the country represents a quarter of total COVID-19 infections but only holds about 5 percent of the world’s population, Fauci said: ‘Yeah, I mean it is. Quantitatively, if you look at it, it is.’

‘The numbers don’t lie.

‘Every country has suffered. We, the United States, has suffered… as much or worse than anyone. 

Anthony Fauci, who is a member of the White House’s coronavirus task force, said that the US has ‘quantitatively’ suffered from the COVID-19 pandemic as the country averages nearly 60,000 new cases and 1,000 deaths per day

‘I mean, when you look at the number of infections and the number of deaths, it really is quite, quite concerning.’ 

Data from Wednesday shows that the US represents 22 percent of global COVID-19 deaths and more than 25 percent of worldwide infections.  

The US has so far recorded 4.8 million positive cases and more than 158,000 Americans have died from COVID-19. 

Deaths related to COVID-19 have now risen nationally for four straight weeks, while the number of infections have declined for the second week, according to an analysis of data.  

Fauci’s tone contrasts with comments made by President Donald Trump on Monday when he declared in an interview with Axios on HBO that coronavirus was ‘under control’ in the US.

When confronted by the fact that an average of 1,000 Americans are dying each day from COVID-19, Trump said: ‘They are dying, that’s true. And you have – it is what it is.’

‘But that doesn’t mean we aren’t doing everything we can. It’s under control as much as you can control it. This is a horrible plague.’ 

Deaths related to COVID-19 have now risen nationally for four straight weeks, while the number of infections have declined for the second week, according to an analysis of data

Deaths related to COVID-19 have now risen nationally for four straight weeks, while the number of infections have declined for the second week, according to an analysis of data

Trump also said in that interview, which was filmed on July 28, that the country’s current death rate was ‘lower than the world’. 

Citing a series of charts and graphs regarding death rates in comparison to cases, Trump said: ‘The United States is lowest in numerous categories. We’re lower than the world, than Europe.’ 

He went on to say: ‘Death is way down from where it was. Where it was is much higher than where it is right now.’  

Even though deaths are now rising across the US, they are below the levels seen in April when an average of 2,000 people a day were dying from the virus. 

Deaths surged in April in the weeks after coronavirus infections spiked mostly in the Northeast. The number of fatalities are now increasing in Sunbelt states and across the Midwest after infections surged there throughout June and July. 

The death rate is a lagging indicator and can continue to rise weeks after new infections drop. A coronavirus death, when it occurs, typically comes several weeks after a person is first infected.  

Fauci went on to say that he doesn’t believe the US would have to lockdown again like it did in April to stop the spread. 

‘We can do much better without locking down,’ he said. 

In an interview with Axios on HBO that was filmed last Tuesday but only aired Monday, Trump said the virus was well-controlled across the US despite the country averaging about 65,000 new cases and 1,000 deaths per day

In an interview with Axios on HBO that was filmed last Tuesday but only aired Monday, Trump said the virus was well-controlled across the US despite the country averaging about 65,000 new cases and 1,000 deaths per day 

He said Americans should wear masks, keep physically distanced, shut down bars, wash their hands and favor outdoor activities over indoor ones in order to help stop transmission of the virus.    

Meanwhile, Dr Deborah Birx – who is leading the White House task force – warned nine cities on Wednesday about increasing cases. 

In a call with state and local officials that was obtained by the Center for Public Integrity, Birx said there were encouraging signs in southern states hit hard by the pandemic. 

‘We are concerned that both Baltimore and Atlanta remain at a very high level,’ Birx said on the call. 

‘Kansas City, Portland, Omaha, of course what we talked about in (California’s) Central Valley.

‘We are seeing a slow uptick in test positivity in cases in places like Chicago, Boston and Detroit and DC,’ she said, adding that the virus has entered a new phase.

‘This outbreak is different from the March, April outbreak in that it’s in both rural and urban areas.’ 

Coronavirus deaths across the United States have increased by 36 percent in a week with states in the Sunbelt and Midwest seeing the largest weekly spikes

Coronavirus deaths across the United States have increased by 36 percent in a week with states in the Sunbelt and Midwest seeing the largest weekly spikes

The number of new COVID-19 cases reported last week fell 5 percent from the previous week. California, Florida and Texas collectively accounted for nearly 180,000 of the new cases, though new infections were lower in all three states compared to the previous week

The number of new COVID-19 cases reported last week fell 5 percent from the previous week. California, Florida and Texas collectively accounted for nearly 180,000 of the new cases, though new infections were lower in all three states compared to the previous week

Ex-WHO doctor says world will be fighting coronavirus for years

Ex-WHO doctor who helped eradicate smallpox says the world will be fighting coronavirus for years as it moves from one hotspot to the next

  • Former WHO doctor, Larry Brilliant, who helped eradicated smallpox said the world would be fighting COVID-19 for at least the next four years 
  • He said, however, that the next few years would not be ‘all doom and gloom’ because effective vaccines will emerge 
  • Currently, there are now 4.7 million coronavirus cases in the US and more than 155,000 Americans have died 
  • Meanwhile, Dr Anthony Fauci said on Monday that the US needs to drive down new COVID-19 cases to below 10,000 
  • He said if new cases didn’t decline rapidly by next month the US would face a ‘really bad situation in the fall’ 
  • Fauci said when cases initially declined in May after striking mostly in the Northeast, cases came down to a baseline of about 20,000
  • He said even 20,000 new cases each day was ‘not a favorable baseline’ 
  • Following a surge in Sunbelt states through June and July, the US is currently averaging about 60,000 cases each day   

A former World Health Organization doctor who helped eradicate smallpox says the the global fight against COVID-19 will carry on for at least the next four years as the virus moves from one hotspot to the next. 

Dr Larry Brilliant, an epidemiologist from California, told USA TODAY that the next few years would not be ‘all doom and gloom’ because effective vaccines will emerge. 

‘We will still be chasing the virus four years from now. But it won’t be like (today),’ Brilliant said. 

‘It will be like the smallpox eradication program. The polio eradication program. Having yellow fever in some countries and not in others. 

‘We’re in for a bad and rocky ride.’ 

Dr Larry Brilliant, an epidemiologist from California who was among the WHO team who fought the eradication of smallpox in the 1970s, says the the global fight against COVID-19 will carry on for at least the next four years

Dr Brilliant, who was among the WHO team who fought the eradication of smallpox in the 1970s, now chairs the Ending Pandemics advisory board. 

He said the US was likely to experience a substantial increase in deaths and infections.  

Currently, there are now 4.7 million coronavirus cases in the US and more than 155,000 Americans have died.

Dr Brilliant said upcoming challenges included Labor Day celebrations, schools reopening, election lines and the flu season. 

It comes as Dr Anthony Fauci said the US needed to drive new COVID-19 cases downwards to under 10,000 per day by next month or risk a catastrophic situation in the fall.     

Fauci, the leading infectious disease expert in the US, said on Monday that coronavirus cases needed to decline rapidly in order to gain some control of the pandemic by the end of the year. 

The US is currently averaging about 60,000 cases each day, bringing the total number of infections to more than 4.7 million.  

‘The country continues to log 50,000 to 60,000 new cases a day, suggesting it is right in the middle of the first wave,’ Fauci told JAMA Network‘s Dr Howard Bauchner.

Dr Anthony Fauci, the leading infectious disease expert in the US, said on Monday that coronavirus cases needed to decline rapidly in order to gain some control of the pandemic by the end of the year

Dr Anthony Fauci, the leading infectious disease expert in the US, said on Monday that coronavirus cases needed to decline rapidly in order to gain some control of the pandemic by the end of the year

‘If we don’t get them down then we’re going to have a really bad situation in the fall. 

The outbreak first struck the US back in March when New York and other Northeastern states saw a surge. 

Infections were on the downward trajectory before spiking in Sunbelt states throughout June and July.   

Fauci said when cases initially declined, it came down to a baseline of about 20,000.

He said even 20,000 new cases each day was ‘not a favorable baseline’.   

‘We’ve got to get our arms around that and contain it as we enter the fall,’ he said of the recent surge in cases.  

Fauci urged Americans to ‘show a degree of consistency’ when it comes to wearing masks, washing hands and social distancing. 

‘It’s not rocket science,’ he said.

He said unless people followed these countermeasures, ‘the virus, if left to its own devices, is going to keep resurging’.    

Fauci said when cases initially declined in May after striking mostly in the Northeast, cases came down to a baseline of about 20,000 He said even 20,000 new cases each day was 'not a favorable baseline'

Fauci said when cases initially declined in May after striking mostly in the Northeast, cases came down to a baseline of about 20,000 He said even 20,000 new cases each day was ‘not a favorable baseline’

Fauci: Rising positive test rates are a ‘good predictor’ states should pause reopenings

As coronavirus cases continue to rise across much of the US, top infectious disease expert Dr Anthony Fauci warned that states need to heed the warning signs when the percentage of people testing positive each day starts to tick upward. 

And when it does, they may need to reconsider their reopening schedules, warned Dr Fauci in an interview with JAMA editor-in-chief Dr Howard Bauchner. 

‘There’s a real potential pattern,’ Dr Fauci said. 

‘It’s become clear now that…if you look back at the states that in the Southern region have surged up and accounted for the 60,000-70,000 cases a day [we’ve been seeing]…prior to the surging, you could detect an early increase for any given state.’ 

He noted that those increases might be as slight as one to one-and-a-half percentage points. 

‘It doesn’t tend to spontaneously come own, it just continues going up…it’s a good predictor of that surge,’ said Dr Fauci.

‘When what we’re seeing is that same insidious increase in percent positive that we’ve seen and pointed out…the critical issue is when you see that, you’ve got to take a look at where you are in the process of reopening. 

‘You may need to pause or drop back a little.’ 

His words of caution come as the US nears 4.7 million cases of coronavirus and surpasses 155,000 deaths – but shows no sign of stopping schools from opening for the fall semester. 

Dr Anthony Fauci (right) warned that even a small increase in the rate of people testing positive for coronavirus should tell states to reconsider their reopening timelines in a Monday interview with JAMA editor-in-chief Dr Howard Bauchner (left)

‘You’ve got to take a look at where you are in the process of trying to reopen and take a good serious look at what you need to do,’ said Dr Fauci. 

‘I don’t think you necessarily have to revert, to go back all the way to closing, but you’ve got to intensify what I consider five or six fundamental things that we know from experience help to blunt resurgences and prevent resurgences.’ 

These of course are the familiar commandments of the coronavirus pandemic: ‘consistent’ proper mask-wearing, avoiding crowds, social distancing, avoiding places where people congregate (namely, bars) and hand-washing. 

‘It sounds really simple, but it can be really effective,’ said Dr Fauci.

‘It’s in our hands…it’s not inevitable that we’re going to see surges if you handle it properly.’ 

But of course, not everyone has handled it ‘properly’ by the measures Dr Fauci articulated.    

In total, nearly half (44 percent) of Americans report ‘always’ wearing a mask outside their homes, according to a recent Gallup poll. Another 28 percent ‘very often’ wear masks. 

But those rates vary dramatically from region to region and demographic group to demographic group. 

More than half of Northeasterners report always wearing masks, but in the Midwest, only a third of people said they do the same. Nearly a quarter of Midwestern respondents said they never wear a mask in public. 

The rates of mask-wearing were about the same among Republicans: 24 percent said they always wear masks in public, and 27 percent said they never do. 

Combined, evidence that masks work to slow the spread of coronavirus and evidence that many Americans don’t comply have led high-profile experts like Dr Fauci and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention director Dr Robert Redfield to call for universal masking. Other politicians and public health experts have gone a step further and said the US should go a step further and mandate masks. 

‘The trouble with mandating is that you can have a counter-reaction against it,’ said Dr Fauci.  

‘In other words, people who push back on authority are going to push back more.’ 

When Dr Bauchner questioned him on the possibility of aerosol transmission of coronavirus – meaning the possibility that one could catch coronavirus not from a nearby coughing person, but simply by inhaling viral particles hanging in the air – Dr Fauci admitted he simply isn’t sure. 

Recent evidence has suggested that infectious particles of the virus can linger in the air even longer and travel even further than previously thought. 

And Dr Fauci said physicists who study the way things travel through the air had even reached out to him and said larger particles may be able to stick around longer than most public health advice has suggested. 

‘So maybe size is something we need to be examining,’ Dr Fauci said.   

‘One thing it tells you,’ Dr Fauci said of the uncertainty surrounding what size particles can transmit the virus,’ is you’d really better wear a mask.’ 

The distance coronavirus can travel is one of myriad things about the still-new pathogen scientists thought they had largely figured out, but has only grown more complicated over time. 

When asked about what he felt the US has done wrong and right throughout the pandemic, Dr Fauci praised the decisions to shut down travel from China and then Europe (the latter of which, CDC director Dr Redfield recently admitted came too late) and President Trump’s ’15 days to slow the spread’ and its extension to 30 days. 

It was a markedly different tone from the one Trump has recently taken when speaking about Dr Fauci. 

When asked about the mistakes the US had made, Dr Fauci refused to take the bait. 

He didn’t deny that mistakes had been made, but emphasized looking forward optimistically, rather than back, critically. 

‘Let’s be humble enough to say we all could have done better,’ Dr Fauci said.