Trump blames ‘sick’ officers who killed George Floyd and COVID for crisis facing his presidency

Donald Trump‘s advisers are reportedly trying to lift the spirits of the embattled president, who believes that he built a highly successful country only to have it battered by COVID-19 and the ‘sick, twisted’ officers who killed George Floyd.

Sources speaking to The Washington Post painted a picture of a man seething with resentment about turn of events in the spring and summer.

They described how the president rants about coronavirus destroying ‘the greatest economy’ – which he claims to have personally built. 

Donald Trump, pictured on Friday at a briefing on counternarcotics in Florida, is said to be increasingly upset that his presidency is being ‘undone’ by forces beyond his control

He decries the unfair ‘fake news’ media, which he says never gives him any credit.

On Friday the death toll rose to 133,777

On Friday the death toll rose to 133,777

And he reportedly bemoans the ‘sick, twisted’ police officers in Minneapolis, whose killing of George Floyd on May 25 provoked the nationwide racial justice protests that have confounded the president. 

On Thursday, the president erupted with a volley of tweets attacking the Supreme Court after they ruled that the Manhattan district attorney could have access to his financial records, and that Congressional committees could potentially see the documents too.

‘This is about PROSECUTORIAL MISCONDUCT,’ he tweeted. 

‘We catch the other side SPYING on my campaign, the biggest political crime and scandal in U.S. history, and NOTHING HAPPENS.’ 

Trump on Thursday vented his fury in a series of tweets, misspelling 'caught' in his haste

Trump on Thursday vented his fury in a series of tweets, misspelling ‘caught’ in his haste

The president's outburst was sparked by a Supreme Court ruling on his financial information

The president’s outburst was sparked by a Supreme Court ruling on his financial information

The court ruled that the Manhattan district attorney could have access to his documents

The court ruled that the Manhattan district attorney could have access to his documents

Barbara Res, a former executive at the Trump Organization, told the paper that his feeling of being victimized was a common trait.

When she worked for Trump, she said, he interpreted nearly everything in deeply personal terms.

Barbara Res worked for Trump Organization

Barbara Res worked for Trump Organization

‘Whatever bad happened, no matter what it was, it was always against him, always directed at him,’ Res said. 

‘He would say, “Why does everything always happen to me?”‘

She added: ‘It was as if the world revolved around him. Everything that happened had an effect on him, good or bad.’

The paper said that his son-in-law Jared Kushner was attempting to soothe him, with the help of Hope Hicks, counselor to the president.

Hicks, with the help of communications adviser Dan Scavino, has reportedly tried to lift Trump’s mood with events they thought he would enjoy, such as celebrating truckers by bringing 18-wheelers onto the White House South Lawn in mid-April or creating social media videos that feature throngs of his adoring fans, according to aides speaking to the paper.

Advisers also tried to assuage his temper by presenting him with internal polling that shows him in a better position than public surveys, which universally show him trailing presumptive Democratic nominee Joe Biden.

Bodies are moved to and from refrigerated morgue trailers at Kingsbrook Jewish Medical Center, Brooklyn, in April. Trump is said to be maddened by the pandemic's progress

Bodies are moved to and from refrigerated morgue trailers at Kingsbrook Jewish Medical Center, Brooklyn, in April. Trump is said to be maddened by the pandemic’s progress

Coronavirus has ravaged the United States, enraging Trump with its economic toll

Coronavirus has ravaged the United States, enraging Trump with its economic toll

There have now been more than 3.1 million cases of COVID-19 confirmed in the U.S.

There have now been more than 3.1 million cases of COVID-19 confirmed in the U.S.

White House spokesman Judd Deere said that Trump was focused on the ‘Transition to Greatness’, and was promoting a message of ‘resilience, hope and optimism.’

George Floyd's death beneath Derek Chauvin's knee sparked weeks of protest

George Floyd’s death beneath Derek Chauvin’s knee sparked weeks of protest

‘The United States of America did not ask for this plague and every American has been affected from the closure of our economy to caring for the sick and mourning those tragically lost,’ he said. 

‘But under the leadership of President Trump our Transition to Greatness has already begun, and the American people are showing tremendous courage to defeat the virus, responsibly open the economy, and restore law and order to our streets.

‘The President’s message has been consistent: resilience, hope, and optimism.’

Yet Jen Psaki, former communications director in the Obama White House, agreed with private assessments that the president’s complaining could be costly.

‘I don’t think he has many sympathetic ears to his claims that he’s been mistreated,’ Psaki said.

‘Leadership, as we’ve seen at many moments in history, is about not only accepting adulation when you do something great but also accepting responsibility. 

‘That lack of accepting responsibility is seen as a lack of leadership and that doesn’t sit well with people who might be more open to supporting him again.’

Two-thirds of Britons back Boris Johnson’s refusal to ‘take the knee’

Two-third of Britons back Boris Johnson‘s refusal to ‘take the knee’ in solidarity with Black Lives Matter protests.

A poll for MailOnline found 67 per cent support the PM’s view that he will not engage in ‘gestures’ and people should not be ‘bullied’ into it.

Just 13 per cent opposed Mr Johnson’s stance, according to the research by Redfield & Wilton Strategies. 

The premier made clear last week that he will not be ‘taking the knee’, despite the protest being adopted around the world since the death of George Floyd in the US.

Mr Johnson insisted was focused on the ‘substance’ of changing social attitudes and improving opportunities for ethnic minorities. 

By contrast, Labour leader Sir Keir Starmer has said he is ‘pleased and proud’ he chose to be photographed kneeling. 

A poll for MailOnline found 67 per cent support the PM’s view that he will not engage in ‘gestures’ and people should not be ‘bullied’ into ‘taking the knee’

Sir Keir Starmer has said he is 'pleased and proud' he chose to 'take the knee' alongside his deputy Angela Rayner last month (pictured)

Sir Keir Starmer has said he is ‘pleased and proud’ he chose to ‘take the knee’ alongside his deputy Angela Rayner last month (pictured)

What are the origins of ‘taking the knee’? 

The ‘taking the knee’ protest was started in 2016 by American football player Colin Kaepernick.

He famously knelt for the US national anthem before playing for the San Francisco 49ers, to demonstrate against police brutality. 

He is believed to have taken the idea from how the US military honour fallen comrades. 

Kaepernick said at the time: ‘I am not going to get up to show pride in a country that oppresses black people and people of colour.

‘To me, this is bigger than football, and it would be selfish on my part to look the other way. There are bodies in the street and people getting paid leave and getting away with murder.’ 

The action was hugely controversial in the US, with critics including Donald Trump saying it disrespected soldiers and the flag. 

However, it spread more widely across US sports over the following years. 

It was initially tolerated by the NFL, before an edict was issued in 2018 insisting all players on the field during  the national anthem must stand.

That ban was overturned earlier this month following outrage over George Floyd’s death. NFL Commissioner Roger Goodel said: ‘We were wrong for not listening to NFL players earlier and encourage all to speak out and peacefully protest.’  

Many believe it destroyed Kaepernick’s career – he has not played a game since his contract ended in 2017. 

It has been widely adopted around the world following George Floyd’s death, with police officers in the UK joining in with the action in public. 

The poll, carried out on Wednesday, found 38 per cent strongly backed Mr Johnson’s position, while another 29 per cent agreed. Just 7 per cent disagreed and six per cent strongly disagreed. Another 16 per cent were neutral and four per cent did not know.

Interestingly, the split was less dramatic when people were asked whether Mr Johnson should ‘take the knee’.

Some 26 per cent agreed he should – 11 per cent ‘strongly’ – against 40 per cent who disagreed – including 26 per cent who ‘strongly’ felt he should not. 

Mr Johnson’s comments, in a phone-in on LBC radio last week, came after Dominic Raab faced a backlash for saying the demonstration was like something out of ‘Game of Thrones’, and the only two people he knelt for were the Queen and his wife when he proposed. 

Asked whether he would ‘take the knee’, Mr Johnson said: ”I don’t believe in gestures. I believe i substance. I believe in doing things that make a practical difference.’ 

Mr Johnson said his concern was that he did not ‘want people to be bullied into doing things that they don’t necessarily want to do’. 

‘If you think what happened with those police officers standing at the Cenotaph. They were being really insulted in quite aggressive terms and being told to take the knee,’ he said.

‘Some of them did. It was very difficult then for the other who didn’t… I think it is very very important that you don’t do things that make life difficult or embarrassing.’

When it was pointed out some senior police had now instructed officers not to take the knee on duty, Mr Johnson ‘I do agree with that.’  

He cited his record as London mayor on improving diversity, saying there had been significant improvements in the past decade, and stressed he wanted to get more black representation in the Cabinet.

‘That what I want to see,’ Mr Johnson said. ‘I would rather see a story of championing success and taking about the opportunities that we can open.’ 

The intervention was condemned by some on Twitter who argued that Mr Johnson was perfectly happy to engage in ‘gestures’ such as clap for carers during the coronavirus crisis.

But others agreed that kneeling ‘adds no value’, and the important thing was to change society. 

Sir Keir said last week that he was ‘pleased and proud’ he had decided to ‘take the knee’.  

‘I don’t regret it at all. It was an expression of solidarity of  recognition of the importance of the BLM movement and what they stand for across the world,’ he said. 

‘It’s got to be an individual choice. I made the choice to do it and I am pleased and proud about that.

‘Others will choose otherwise.’    

Guidance varies across the country, but the Met Police has told its officers they should not kneel at public order events for their own safety, although at other times it is down to personal choice. 

It emerged this week that soldiers have been banned from ‘taking the knee’ because it is deemed too political.

Commanders warned personnel at HMS Sultan in Gosport, Hampshire, that when in uniform they could not partake in the action.

Defence officials are currently reviewing the policy to see if there’s any leeway where they can show their respect in other ways. 

Police (including Kent's chief constable, pictured last month) have previously 'taken the knee' in solidarity with BLM protests. However, many officers have now been advised not to

Police (including Kent’s chief constable, pictured last month) have previously ‘taken the knee’ in solidarity with BLM protests. However, many officers have now been advised not to  

The ‘taking the knee’ protest was started in 2016 by American football player Colin Kaepernick.

He famously knelt for the US national anthem before playing for the San Francisco 49ers, to demonstrate against police brutality. 

Kaepernick said at the time: ‘I am not going to get up to show pride in a country that oppresses black people and people of colour.

‘To me, this is bigger than football, and it would be selfish on my part to look the other way. There are bodies in the street and people getting paid leave and getting away with murder.’ 

The action was hugely controversial in the US, with critics saying it disrespected soldiers and the flag. It was banned by the NFL amid anger from Donald Trump, and many believe it destroyed Kaepernick’s career.

It has been widely adopted around the world following George Floyd’s death, and used by Premier League footballers before matches.

Gangs pose ‘greatest danger’ to young black men NOT police, says equality champion Trevor Phillips

A former head of the Commission for Racial Equality has urged young black men to realise the “greatest danger” to them is gangs – not the police.

Trevor Phillips, 66, said yesterday British youngsters should not look to compare Britain’s problems with America.

His intervention came after some protests at Black Lives Matter marches in the UK over George Floyd’s death descended into violence.

And it came on the same day the Independent Office for Police Conduct said it would launch an inquiry into racial discrimination in the use of stop and search by forces across England and Wales.

Mr Phillips pointed out hundreds of youngsters were dying every year due to gang-related crime.

He said: ‘There is absolutely no doubt that if you are thinking about what is the greatest danger today to a young black man in the capital, the answer is not the police, it’s somebody else in a gang.

Former Commission for Racial Equality head Trevor Phillips warned gangs not police were the biggest problem facing young black me in the UK

Mr Phillips said people of colour are more likely to be searched by police, seen here at Notting Hill Carnival in 2017

Mr Phillips said people of colour are more likely to be searched by police, seen here at Notting Hill Carnival in 2017

“That person is very likely to be a person of colour.

“While we have to get the police to do the right thing and behave in the right way, let us not forget that young black men are dying in hundreds every year. Never mind the ones that are being injured and maimed.”

Mr Phillips made the comments to the The Telegraph’s Planet Normal podcast and said there was “clearly a problem” stop and searches.

He spoke out after the Met apologised to British sprinter Bianca Williams after she and her partner were pulled over in their car

Her three-month-old son was also in their Mercedes with them on Saturday when it was stopped and footage she shot went viral on the internet.

Earlier this week Met Commissioner Dame Cressida Dick told a committee of MPs officers had visited Ms Williams to apologise for “distress” caused by the stop.

British sprinter Bianca Williams with her partner Ricardo dos Santos pulled over by police

British sprinter Bianca Williams with her partner Ricardo dos Santos pulled over by police

Footage of the stop and search went viral online after it was posted on the internet

Footage of the stop and search went viral online after it was posted on the internet

Ms Williams believes she and her partner Ricardo dos Santos, a Portuguese international 400m runner, were racially profiled by officers because they were black.

Mr Phillips said he too had been pulled over in the same way by police 20 years ago in an ‘absurd’ stop.

He described it as ‘humiliating and ridiculous” before adding that people of colour were more likely to be pulled over ‘in a way that is not courteous, that is not founded in some proper crime-fighting activity’.

Black Lives Matter protests have been in held in the UK, but some have exploded into various with some campaigners (not pictured here) becoming aggressive towards the police

Black Lives Matter protests have been in held in the UK, but some have exploded into various with some campaigners (not pictured here) becoming aggressive towards the police

The Independent Office for Police Conduct is set to launch an inquiry into racial discrimination in the use of stop and search by forces across England and Wales.

It is looking at police forces in the UK to examine whether there are any patterns of prejudice against ethnic minorities.

The murder of Nicole Smallman, 27, and Bibaa Henry, 46, will be investigated after two officers were arrested after it was alleged that they took selfies with their bodies in the background.

Footage revealed yesterday showed Sussex Police holding down a man who was complaining that he could not breath

Footage revealed yesterday showed Sussex Police holding down a man who was complaining that he could not breath

Figures from the Met Police show that less than one per cent of the more than 250 annual complaints about racism are upheld.

Yesterday the MailOnline showed footage of an arrested man claiming he couldn’t breathe while three officers restrained him.

The footage of the man sparked an internal investigation by Sussex Police and Britain’s police watchdog.

The suspect, who is believed to be from Brighton’s BAME community, was held on suspicion of criminal damage and assaulting an emergency worker in Montpelier Road this week.

The unnamed man is heard yelling: ‘I can’t breathe. That is my Adam’s apple and you are crushing it’ – but the officer closest to his head repeatedly tells him that his arm is on his collarbone.

The footage emerged two days before a Black Lives Matter protest in the city following the murder of George Floyd in the US who died when a police officer crushed his neck with his knee.

In a statement, Sussex Police said: ‘Police officers searching for a vulnerable missing teenager attended an address in Montpelier Road in Brighton at 10.15am on Tuesday 7 July.

‘A resident of the address, a 28-year-old man, refused police entry and was arrested.

‘Police subsequently found the missing 17-year-old young woman hiding at the property and returned them safely home.’

AG Barr admits that the unfair policing of African Americans is a ‘widespread phenomenon’

Attorney General William Barr said on Wednesday that the unfair policing of African Americans is a ‘widespread phenomenon’ before rejecting calls to defund the police.

Protests over the recent police killings of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Tony McDade and other African Americans have ignited a national conversation about the role of law enforcement in society. 

During an interview with ABC News‘ Pierre Thomas, Barr addressed policing in America, saying: ‘I do think it is a widespread phenomenon that African American males, in particular, are treated with extra suspicion and maybe not given the benefit of the doubt.’

‘I think it is wrong if people are not respected appropriately and given their due,’ he explained, ‘and I think it’s something we have to address,’ he added. 

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Attorney General William Barr said on Wednesday that the unfair policing of African Americans is a ‘widespread phenomenon’

During an interview with ABC News ' Pierre Thomas (left), Barr (right) addressed policing in America, saying: 'I do think it is a widespread phenomenon that African American males, in particular, are treated with extra suspicion and maybe not given the benefit of the doubt'

During an interview with ABC News ‘ Pierre Thomas (left), Barr (right) addressed policing in America, saying: ‘I do think it is a widespread phenomenon that African American males, in particular, are treated with extra suspicion and maybe not given the benefit of the doubt’

Since May 25, when Floyd died under the knee of white Minneapolis cop, Derek Chauvin, demonstrators have taken to the streets with a rallying cry of ‘defund the police’, which supporters say isn’t about eliminating police departments or stripping agencies of all of their money. 

But it’s more so about it being time for the country to address systemic problems in policing in America and spend more on what communities across the US need, like housing and education.

However, when asked whether there is ‘value in defunding the police’, Barr said: ‘No, because I don’t think the money should come out of the police.

‘We have to think about more investment in the police. So one of the things we’ve been talking about is trying to direct some of the [Health and Human Services] money and grant programs and sync it up with law enforcement spending so we can enable the departments to have co-responders. 

‘That is, social workers and mental health experts who can go on certain kinds of calls to help.’

Barr then spoke to ABC News about the Black Lives Matter movement.

Thomas explained to Barr that ‘Black Lives Matter is a term that’s being used, it’s a group that pushes for civil rights of African Americans,’ before asking: ‘What’s– what’s your view of Black Lives Matter? And are you willing to say Black Lives Matter?’

‘Well, I make a distinction. I’d make a distinction between the organization, which I don’t agree with. They have a broader agenda,’ Barr responded. 

‘But in terms of the proposition that black lives matter, obviously black lives matter. I think all lives all human life is sacred and entitled to respect. And obviously, black lives matter. 

‘But I also think that it’s being used now is sort of distorting the debate to some extent, because it’s used really to refer exclusively to black lives that are lost to police misconduct, which are, you know, have been going down statistically.  

‘I also think [the phrase] is being used now – it is distorting the debate to some extent, because it is used really to refer almost exclusively to black lives that are lost to police misconduct,’ he said. 

‘Then you compare it to 8,000 homicides in the African American community, those are black lives that matter, too. And those are lives that are protected by the police.’   

Protests erupted globally following the killing of George Floyd on May 25

Protests erupted globally following the killing of George Floyd on May 25

Since then, proposed federal legislation that would radically transform the nation's criminal justice system through such changes as eliminating agencies like the Drug Enforcement Administration and the use of surveillance technology was unveiled Tuesday

Since then, proposed federal legislation that would radically transform the nation’s criminal justice system through such changes as eliminating agencies like the Drug Enforcement Administration and the use of surveillance technology was unveiled Tuesday

Protests erupted globally following the killing of George Floyd on May 25.  

Since then, proposed federal legislation that would radically transform the nation’s criminal justice system through such changes as eliminating agencies like the Drug Enforcement Administration and the use of surveillance technology was unveiled Tuesday by the Movement for Black Lives.

Dubbed the BREATHE Act, the legislation is the culmination of a project led by the policy table of the Movement for Black Lives, a coalition of more than 150 organizations.

‘We stand on the shoulders of giants and there has been 400 years of work that black people have done to try to get us closer to freedom,’ Black Lives Matter co-founder Patrisse Cullors said. 

‘This moment is a watershed moment. I think this moment calls for structural change and transformative change in ways that we haven’t seen in a very long time. We see this opportunity to push for the BREATHE Act as a part of what we’re calling the modern-day civil rights act.’

The proposed changes are sweeping and likely to receive robust pushback from lawmakers who perceive the legislation as too radical.

No members of Congress have yet said they plan to introduce the bill, but it has won early support among some of the more progressive lawmakers, including Ayanna Pressley and Rashida Tlaib, who participated in Tuesday’s news conference.

The bill is broken into four sections, the first of which specifically would divest federal resources from incarceration and policing. 

It is largely aimed at federal reforms because Congress can more easily regulate federal institutions and policy, as opposed to state institutions or private prisons.

The other sections lay out a detailed plan to achieve an equitable future, calling for sweeping changes that would eliminate federal programs and agencies ‘used to finance and expand’ the US criminal-legal system.

The elimination would target agencies such as the Immigration and Customs Enforcement, which has come under fire in recent years for its aggressive deportation efforts, and lesser-known programs such as Department of Defense 1033, which allows local law enforcement agencies to obtain excess military equipment.

The act, which also seeks to reduce the Department of Defense budget, would institute changes to the policing, pretrial detention, sentencing and prosecution practices that Cullors said have long disproportionately criminalized Black and brown communities, LGBTQIA people, Indigenous people and individuals with disabilities.

It would establish the Neighborhood Demilitarization Program, which would collect and destroy all equipment like military-grade armored vehicles and weapons in the hands of local, state, and federal law enforcement agencies by 2022.

Federal law enforcement also would be unable to use facial-recognition technology, which many communities across the nation already have banned, along with drones and forms of electronic surveillance such as ankle-monitoring.

Photo of ‘fake’ $20 bill that led to George Floyd’s death shown

The ‘fake’ $20 bill George Floyd was killed over in Minneapolis in May has been seen for the first time in court documents filed by one of the cops charged with his death.  

Thomas Lane was one of four cops who held Floyd down as he gasped for breath and begged for life on May 25 after being arrested for allegedly using a counterfeit $20 to pay for something in a convenience store in Minneapolis. 

Derek Chauvin knelt on Floyd’s neck whereas Lane and two others; J.A. Kueng and  Thao Tou, held the man down.

Chauvin has been charged with murder and manslaughter and the other three have been charged with aiding and abetting him. 

The money George Floyd was killed over, photographed above in evidence that was submitted to court on Tuesday by one of the cops’ lawyers

The money was crumpled and stuffed down the side of the passenger seat. The cops said they thought Floyd was reaching potentially for a gun

The money was crumpled and stuffed down the side of the passenger seat. The cops said they thought Floyd was reaching potentially for a gun

Other photos from the court records show the money crumpled down the side of Floyd's seat

Other photos from the court records show the money crumpled down the side of Floyd’s seat 

But in a court filing on Wednesday, Lane’s attorney said there was no probable cause against him.  

He submitted photos of inside Floyd’s car which include images of what he calls to ‘crumpled’ fake $20 bills and two $1 bills. 

Also inside the car were Floyd’s sunglasses. 

Lane’s attorneys said : ‘The pictures in this exhibit show crumpled up money, two – counterfeit twenty dollar bills, and two –one dollar bills, lodged in between the center console and the passenger seat.

‘Right where Lane saw Floyd put his right hand.’ 

Lane’s attorney says he was the rookie who was simply following orders from Chauvin.

He’d only been on the job for two weeks when he arrested Floyd.

‘There is not substantial admissible evidence to survive a motion for a directed verdict that Thomas Lane aided and abetted second degree murder or manslaughter,’ his attorneys said.

They argued that the officers were ‘justified’ in their restraint of Floyd, saying: ‘The decision to restrain Floyd was reasonably justified. Prior to approaching the vehicle, officers saw furtive movement in the vehicle. 

‘Officers did not know if there was a gun involved or if the occupants of the vehicle were planning to flee. 

‘It was later learned that it was counterfeit money that Floyd was shoving into the side of the seat where officers saw him reaching, as evidenced by the pictures.

George Floyd was killed on May 25

Floyd died after officer Derek Chauvin knelt on his neck for nearly nine minutes

George Floyd was killed on May 25 after officer Derek Chauvin knelt on his neck for nearly nine minutes

Also in the car were a pair of sunglasses and a plastic bottle

Also in the car were a pair of sunglasses and a plastic bottle 

‘Floyd was uncooperative from the second officers approached his vehicle. Floyd was actively resisting and acting erratic for over 10 minutes,’ they wrote.

‘Floyd had just committed a felony, he was not being cooperative, and appeared to be under the influence of drugs. There was a lengthy struggle to get 6 foot four, 223 pound Floyd into the car. Floyd initially claimed he was claustrophobic and Lane offered to stay with him, roll the windows down, and turn the air conditioning on. Floyd still would not comply. 

Thomas Lane had only been a cop for four days when Floyd was killed. He says he was just following orders and shouldn't be charged

Thomas Lane had only been a cop for four days when Floyd was killed. He says he was just following orders and shouldn’t be charged

‘He continued to yell and kick back, and began bleeding during the struggle in the squad vehicle. While in the squad vehicle, Floyd was yelling that he was going to die and he could not breathe. 

‘Then there was a decision, based on Floyd’s request, to bring him to the ground, when they could not get him fully in the vehicle,’ the attorney wrote. 

The lawyer goes on to say that Lane was at Floyd’s feet and did not have a clear view of his neck so did not know that Chauvin was kneeling on it.

‘Based on Floyd’s actions up to this point, the officers had no idea what he would do next – hurt himself, hurt the officers, flee, or anything else, but he was not cooperating,’ he wrote. 

He also claimed that Lane asked ‘twice’ if Floyd should be moved onto his side, and said Chauvin assured him that he was fine.

‘Lane did not know what Chauvin was thinking while restraining Floyd. Chauvin did not verbally tell Lane anything about his intentions other than waiting for the ambulance to arrive. 

‘Lane knew Floyd needed to be restrained and he knew Chauvin was authorized to use reasonable force to restrain,’ the lawyer wrote.

Another angle of the infamous video shows Chauvin with his knee on Floyd's neck and the three other cops right beside him in Minneapolis last Monday

Another angle of the infamous video shows Chauvin with his knee on Floyd’s neck and the three other cops right beside him in Minneapolis last Monday