Coronavirus patients stop being infectious after 11 days of being ill

Coronavirus patients stop being infectious after 11 days even if they still test positive for the disease, study finds

  • Infected person becomes contagious around two days before symptoms show 
  • Then contagious for 7 to 10 days after they start showing signs of the disease 
  • Covid-19 ‘could not be isolated or cultured after day 11’, researchers said
  • Here’s how to help people impacted by Covid-19

Coronavirus patients can’t infect others after 11 days of being ill even if their test still comes back positive, scientists find. 

An infected person becomes contagious around two days before symptoms show, researchers from Singapore found.

They then remain contagious for between seven and ten days after they start showing signs of the disease – which include having a high temperature and a new and continuous cough. 

Covid-19 ‘could not be isolated or cultured after day 11’ of the illness, researchers said.

Scientists from Singapore’s  National Center for Infectious Diseases and the Academy of Medicine examined 73 patients with coronavirus.

Coronavirus patients can’t infect others after 11 days of being ill even if their test still comes back positive, scientists find. Pictured: A medical worker takes a swab from a patient in Beijing

An infected person becomes contagious around two days before symptoms show, researchers from Singapore found. Pictured: A coronavirus drive through testing centre in Arizona

An infected person becomes contagious around two days before symptoms show, researchers from Singapore found. Pictured: A coronavirus drive through testing centre in Arizona

They looked at whether the bug could be passed from them to someone else, the New York Post reported.

Positive tests in patients that still had symptoms after two weeks could be picking up sections of the bug that cannot pass the virus on to someone else. 

The authors wrote: ‘Based on the accumulated data since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, the infectious period of [coronavirus] in symptomatic individuals may begin around two days before the onset of symptoms, and persists for about seven to ten days after the onset of symptoms.’

They added: ‘Active viral replication drops quickly after the first week, and viable virus was not found after the second week of illness.’

It comes as the UK reported a further 118 coronavirus deaths, a 30 per cent drop since last Sunday's 170, taking the total to 36,793

It comes as the UK reported a further 118 coronavirus deaths, a 30 per cent drop since last Sunday’s 170, taking the total to 36,793

Covid-19 'could not be isolated or cultured after day 11' of the illness, researchers said. Pictured: A coronavirus test being taken in Beijing

Covid-19 ‘could not be isolated or cultured after day 11’ of the illness, researchers said. Pictured: A coronavirus test being taken in Beijing

It comes as the UK reported a further 118 coronavirus deaths, a 30 per cent drop since last Sunday’s 170, taking the total to 36,793.

The daily death figure, revealed by Prime Minister Boris Johnson at the daily press briefing this evening, is the lowest since the lockdown was put into force on March 23.

Scientists hope that their research on the disease’s ability to spread could help hospitals figure out when to send admitted patients home.   



Coronavirus could be completely wiped out in Britain by September 30

Coronavirus pandemic could be over in the UK by September 30: Scientific model predicts virus will continue its steady decline with NO second wave

  • Singapore University of Technology plotted data from the Covid-19 pandemic 
  • United States will extinguish the infection by November 11, the team discovered
  • The model predicts the trajectory of the spread of the virus over time
  • Also tracks actual number of new confirmed cases per day in a given as of May 12
  • Here’s how to help people impacted by Covid-19

Coronavirus could be completely wiped out in the UK on September 30, according to modelling from scientists. 

A team at the Singapore University of Technology plotted data from the pandemic to pinpoint the date cases will die out in countries hardest hit by the disease.

They predict a total eradication of the bug in Britain with no new cases – or a second wave – at all from the end of September.

The US, where most Covid-19 deaths have been recorded, will extinguish the infection by November 11.

The model by the Singapore University of Technology predicts the pandemic in the UK will be over by September 30

The US, where most Covid-19 deaths have been recorded, will extinguish the infection by November 11

The US, where most Covid-19 deaths have been recorded, will extinguish the infection by November 11 

The model predicts the trajectory of the spread of the virus over time while tracking the actual number of new confirmed cases per day in a given country, as of May 12. 

By plotting the acceleration and deceleration rates of each country’s outbreak, the scientists have conjured up a prediction of when the virus will wane.

In other developments to Britain’s coronavirus crisis today: 

  • There were calls for Boris Johnson’s top aide Dominic Cummings to resign after it emerged he flouted lockdown rules to travel 260miles to his elderly parents’ home;
  • It emerged that travel firms are already planning to exploit a loophole in the 14-day quarantine period by flying holidaymakers into UK via Dublin (which is exempt from new isolation rules); 
  • Labour leader Keir Starmer revealed his children have attended school throughout the coronavirus crisis as he called for classes to resume ‘as soon as possible’;
  • Employers were told they will have to pay 25 per cent of wages of furloughed staff from August, raising fears of a wave of redundancies;
  • Boris Johnson will drop drop the ‘track’ in his ‘test, track and trace’ system that is designed to get Britain out lockdown because the NHSX app will not be ready for weeks. 

This positive news out amid the crisis, which has killed thousands. Pictured: People meeting up in Wandsworth, London, today

This positive news out amid the crisis, which has killed thousands. Pictured: People meeting up in Wandsworth, London, today

This positive news out amid the crisis, which has killed thousands and placed millions under lockdown, will come as relief for many.

Britain today announced 282 more coronavirus deaths, including a 12-year-old with an undisclosed underlying health condition – taking the UK’s total fatalities to 36,675.

However, researchers noted the predictions by nature are likely to be uncertain due to the complexity of the virus as well as other factors including the restrictions and testing protocols in place in a country. 

They write: ‘The wicked and uncertain nature of this pandemic makes the intent for prediction accuracy misleading.’ 

In Trafalgar Square, people were out and about today. Some sat on the steps leading up to the National Gallery

In Trafalgar Square, people were out and about today. Some sat on the steps leading up to the National Gallery

A large group of surfers gathered together to make the most of the waves at Bournemouth Pier. Lockdown measures were eased this month

A large group of surfers gathered together to make the most of the waves at Bournemouth Pier. Lockdown measures were eased this month

‘The model and data are inaccurate to the complex, evolving, and heterogeneous realities of different countries over time. Predictions are uncertain by nature,’ the report states. 

‘Over-optimism based on some predictions is dangerous because it may loosen our disciplines and controls and cause the turnaround of the virus and infection, and must be avoided.’ 

The study also found predictive monitoring in early May showed the US – and second worst-hit country Brazil- could still suffer for the remainder of the year, without stricter restrictions or a vaccine.    

For Italy, which once led the world in the number of coronavirus cases, could recover by October 24, according to modeling as of May 8.



US coronavirus pandemic could be over as early as November, predictive model shows

The coronavirus pandemic in the United States could be over as early as mid-November, new modeling has shown. 

Researchers at Singapore University of Technology and Design have created a complex model predicting the exact date the pandemic will end in the US, UK, and other countries around the world. 

According to the data, the US is on track to be coronavirus-free by November 11, while the UK could see an earlier end date of September 30.  

The model predicts the trajectory of the spread of the virus over time while tracking the actual number of new confirmed cases per day in a given country, as of May 12. 

Predictive modeling by Singapore University of Technology and Design estimates the US coronavirus crisis could end by November 11 

The US has the highest number of coronavirus cases in the world, topping 1.6million as of Saturday, and 95,979 deaths

The US has the highest number of coronavirus cases in the world, topping 1.6million as of Saturday, and 95,979 deaths 

However, researchers noted the predictions by nature are likely to be uncertain due to the complexity of the virus as well as other factors including the restrictions and testing protocols in place in a country. 

In the US, changes in predictions were tracked over a one-week period and found to be relatively stable, suggesting a ‘long time to reach its theoretical ending’. 

‘The estimated curves of USA for a week together, showing a high stability, while one might still want additional policies or actions to further shorten the tails of the curves,’ the report states. 

The study also found predictive monitoring in early May showed the US – and second worst-hit country Brazil – could still suffer for the remainder of the year, without stricter restrictions or a vaccine.    

For Italy, which once led the world in the number of coronavirus cases, could recover by October 24, according to modeling as of May 8. 

However, scientists note the predictions are only estimates and subject to change depending on various factors. 

‘The model and data are inaccurate to the complex, evolving, and heterogeneous realities of different countries over time. Predictions are uncertain by nature,’ the report states. 

‘Over-optimism based on some predictions is dangerous because it may loosen our disciplines and controls and cause the turnaround of the virus and infection, and must be avoided.’ 

As of Saturday, there are 1,600,937 confirmed cases of coronavirus in the US and 95,979 deaths. 

It comes as all 50 states have begun gradually reopening and easing restrictions following months of lockdown.

But experts and health officials have since cautioned that easing restrictions too soon could lead to a spike in cases.  

Earlier this month, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Dr. Anthony Fauci warned another wave of the virus was ‘inevitable’.  

The model predicts the pandemic in the UK will be over by September 30

The model predicts the pandemic in the UK will be over by September 30

As of May 8,  the coronavirus pandemic in Italy was on track to end October 24

As of May 8,  the coronavirus pandemic in Italy was on track to end October 24 

Dr Fauci said reopening cities and states too quickly could trigger an outbreak that would get out of control and turn the clock back on efforts to fight the coronavirus.

‘You will trigger an outbreak as you may not be able to control,’ he warned in his testimony before the Senate. 

Even with widespread testing and social distancing measures, health authorities have warned there is no guarantee until a vaccine is developed.   

In his testimony before the Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee, Fauci said scientists are already testing possible vaccines in a phase one clinical trial with an eye of going to phase two this summer.

‘If we are successful, we hope to know that in the late fall and early winter,’ he said.

He also said there were at least eight vaccines in clinical development. 

He warned that with the testing could come negative consequences, including the death of patients.

‘I must warn that there is also the possibility of negative consequences where certain vaccines can actually enhance the negative effect of the infection,’ he said.

He also warned as states begin to reopen – thus pulling back on stay-at-home orders and social distancing – ‘you will see some cases reappear.’

‘There is no doubt even under the best of circumstances, when you pull back on mitigation, you will see some cases appear,’ Fauci warned, adding the U.S. must be prepared for ‘when the inevitable return of infections occurs.’

‘We will start to see little spikes that might turn into outbreaks,’ he noted.     



Moment boy, 9, weeps with joy as he tucks into his first McDonald’s after months of lockdown

Now THAT’S a Happy Meal! Moment nine-year-old boy weeps with joy as he tucks into his first McDonald’s after months of lockdown in Singapore

  • Adam Bin Mohammad Irwan was overcome with emotion after seeing the meal
  • Mum Wati shared the video on Facebook, it has been viewed over 73,000 times
  • At one point Adam affectionately brings the chicken nugget up to his cheek 

This is the heartwarming moment a nine-year-old autistic boy broke down in tears after his mother brought him his first McDonald’s since the start of lockdown.

Mum Wati filmed herself showing her son Adam Bin Mohammad Irwan, 9, the McDonald’s takeout on May 18.

The fast food giant reopened on May 10 in Singapore after weeks of closure.

The video begins with Wati sat in her car. ‘Hello guys. I’m [getting] McDonald’s. It’s a surprise!’ she said.

She brings the food into the house and leads Adam into the kitchen where the food is spread out on the table.   

At the outset Adam thinks his mum is playing a prank.  

‘I thought you wanted to scare me,’ he said, before giving his mum a hug, who is quick to reassure him.   

At one point Adam affectionately brings the chicken nugget up to his cheek

‘I didn’t want to scare you! I wanted to surprised you. Look, what is it?’ she said

‘McDonald’s,’ he said.

Adam is then filmed eating some chicken nuggets. At one point he puts one of the nuggets up to his face as if to hug it.

Mum Wati shared the video on Facebook. She added that McNuggets with fries and ice cream was Adam's favourite meal

Mum Wati shared the video on Facebook. She added that McNuggets with fries and ice cream was Adam’s favourite meal

He is heard thanking his mother through tears, delighted to see his favourite meal and overcome by the situation.

Mum Wati shared the video on Facebook, where it has been viewed over 73,000 times, much to the delight of users.  

She added that McNuggets with fries and ice cream was Adam’s favourite meal.

She also said that her son has sensory sensitivity and mild autism that caused his ‘overreaction.’   



Spandau Ballet star Tony Hadley helps wronged radio quizzer win Gold with £5,760 prize 

Spandau Ballet’s Tony Hadley helps radio quizzer win £5,760 prize after the Singaporean contestant was ruled out for pronouncing the star’s name wrong

  • The challenge was to identify 14 famous voices from one-second clips
  • Listener of Singapore’s Gold 905, Muhammad Shalehan, thought he had won
  • However, he was told he had not pronounced Tony Hadley’s name correctly
  • Hearing this, the Spandau Ballet star came to the man’s rescue

When a listener was told he hadn’t won a radio station’s quiz because he had pronounced a pop star’s name wrongly, he received some helpful backing – from the singer himself.

The intervention by Tony Hadley, of 1980s band Spandau Ballet, caused bosses to change their minds and finally award train driver Muhammad Shalehan the £5,760 cash prize.

Mr Shalehan, 32, had been taking part in the Celebrity Name Drop competition run by Singapore station Gold 905 – which could have been a good omen, given that Spandau Ballet’s hits include Gold. And also True…

Backing: Spandau Ballet star Tony Hadley in his video

But he was told that despite identifying 14 famous voices from one-second clips, he had mispronounced Hadley’s name and so the prize went to someone else.

Feeling hard done by, the father of three wrote to the singer. ‘I would have thought Tony Hadley had better things to do than reply to me,’ he admitted. ‘To my shock, he replied and even recorded a video endorsing my pronunciation of his name.’

In the video, 59-year-old Hadley, who is in lockdown at his Buckinghamshire home, says: ‘I’ve listened back to the tape, and as far as I’m concerned, you pronounced my name absolutely correctly.’

Always believe in your soul: Muhammad Shalehan

Always believe in your soul: Muhammad Shalehan

Hadley says there may have been a slight accent, but ‘you should be entitled to whatever the prize was’.

The radio station yesterday agreed to pay out, and fund a shopping trip.

Hadley told the BBC Mr Shalehan had won ‘fair and square’. ‘I did listen to it several times, to be really, really sure. And I thought – hold on, this guy is genuine, it’s a lot of money, he’s done incredibly well to get to that point,’ he said.