close
close
Would you dump someone your friends didn't like? - ReadSector

Would you dump someone your friends didn’t like?

Would you dump someone your friends and family didn’t like? Singles give their verdict on the controversial question – and you might be surprised

  • Australian relationship expert Louanne Ward has posed a question on Facebook
  • She asked followers if the opinion of friends and family matters to a relationship
  • While some said it was a ‘personal choice’ who your partner is, others disagreed
  • That partner will have to be around your loved ones and blend in accordingly 

Poll

Is it a red flag if your friends, family or kids don’t like your partner?

  • Yes, it’s an instant dealbreaker 0 votes
  • No, I won’t be swayed by others 0 votes

An Australian dating coach has polled the public about whether they would dump someone if their friends, family or kids didn’t like them.

Relationship expert Louanne Ward, from Perth, Western Australia, posed the controversial question on her Facebook page She Said, He Said on July 19, calling on those who were coupled up and single to decide if it was a ‘red flag’ situation.

For many people their family and friends’ reaction ‘depended on the circumstances’ and needed to come from a place of genuine concern rather than masked jealousy to ‘count’, while others said their loved ones can ‘see things they can’t’.

An Australian dating coach has polled the public about whether they would dump someone if their friends, family or kids didn’t like them – with some saying it’s a deeply ‘personal matter’ 

‘There’s obviously a reason if they all don’t like the person you’re dating. Definitely one big fat red flag,’ one woman said, having been in the predicament herself.

‘Sometimes those that love you can see things that you can’t especially if you’re in that ‘love bubble’. They may believe you deserve better or they may know things about this person that aren’t good for you,’ said another.

A third added: ‘If these people who love me and have my back can see through something that my heart has covered up then yes, I would listen to them seriously and consider it a huge red flag, and most likely a dealbreaker’.

But others said that family members had only told them they didn’t like their partner after they had broken up, which wasn’t helpful at all.

'There's obviously a reason if they all don't like the person you're dating. Definitely one big fat red flag,' one woman said, having been in the predicament herself (stock image)

‘There’s obviously a reason if they all don’t like the person you’re dating. Definitely one big fat red flag,’ one woman said, having been in the predicament herself (stock image)

‘I didn’t get told by family and less than two years of marriage and living together later it was over,’ one woman said. 

‘Then through all my sobbing they all came over to tell me what they really thought… oh well I look back now and can see it clearly but age has something to do with that’.

Some Australians were of the opinion that others shouldn’t interfere with the relationship at all and their comments would make ‘no difference’.

‘No it’s about what I value and nobody else. I mean seriously when I find a great cook and someone that can iron properly, of course I’ll keep her,’ one man joked.

‘The person I am dating or with has nothing to do with the family, the families job is to accept them, not make them or you uncomfortable,’ said another.

Louanne appreciated the debate and replied to a number of comments, saying that it was 'very true' that we're often 'blind with love in the early days'

Louanne appreciated the debate and replied to a number of comments, saying that it was ‘very true’ that we’re often ‘blind with love in the early days’

Some Australians were of the opinion that others shouldn't interfere with the relationship at all and their comments would make 'no difference' (stock image)

Some Australians were of the opinion that others shouldn’t interfere with the relationship at all and their comments would make ‘no difference’ (stock image)

Louanne appreciated the debate and replied to a number of comments, saying that it was ‘very true’ that we’re often ‘blind with love in the early days’. 

During that time it can sometimes be helpful to be shown someone’s ‘true colours’ if needed.

‘But I think friends and family care about potentially hurting your feelings or worry they may isolate themselves so it is safer not to say anything,’ Louanne said.

‘It is rarely helpful after the event although I guess it does offer a form of support.’

Ultimately she agreed it is always down to individual choice.

‘You always need to follow your heart and ultimately decide what represents more value to you. Sometimes our friends and family may not approve of choices and decide to step aside but they are usually there at the end of the day,’ she said.