British Airways reveals new menu on flights from London Gatwick and it includes caviar

British Airways has revealed a multi-million-pound revamp of its food service on all flights from London Gatwick.

Menus will now include the likes of seared cod, ale-braised beef and even caviar, with the airline saying the menu has been ‘reimagined and improved’.

The new food has a focus on provenance and BA says the provider, Newrest, has been ‘working closely with suppliers in the south of England to source the best quality ingredients’.

One of the new dishes available to passengers in BA’s Club World cabin. It consists of pan-fried Parmesan polenta with wild mushroom ragout, wilted greens and savoury walnut granola

One of the new dishes available to First passengers on BA flights from Gatwick is Onley Oak ribeye steak with vine cherry tomatoes, baby watercress and beef jus, pictured

The new food has a focus on provenance

One of the new dishes available to First passengers on BA flights from Gatwick is Onley Oak ribeye steak with vine cherry tomatoes, baby watercress and beef jus, left. The new food has a focus on provenance

Seared fillet of cod with butter beans, saffron, crispy chorizo and smoked paprika sauce will be served in Club World

Seared fillet of cod with butter beans, saffron, crispy chorizo and smoked paprika sauce will be served in Club World

A starter of warm crab and potato cake with heritage tomato salsa. It is available in First

Chocolate mille-feuille with raspberry coulis is one of the new desserts in First from Gatwick

A starter of warm crab and potato cake with heritage tomato salsa, left, and a dessert of chocolate mille-feuille with raspberry coulis, right. Both are new dishes in First 

Passengers can enjoy the new menus across all long-haul cabins – World Traveller (economy), World Traveller Plus (premium economy), Club World (business) and First.

On short-haul services, the new food will be served in Club Europe (business) while Marks & Spencer products will still be available to buy in Euro Traveller (economy).

Among the main courses now on offer in Club Europe are Hampshire chalk stream trout gremolata with roasted new potatoes, fennel and dill sauce; Severn and Wye smoked salmon blinis with crème fraîche and keta caviar and seared fillet of cod with lemon and chive linguine in a tomato basil sauce.

In Club World, starters include British cured Cumbrian ham with smoked aubergine purée and basil pesto as well as a roasted heirloom of winter squash with goat’s curd and caramelised pear with honey and Tewkesbury mustard dressing.

In Club World, passengers can dine on roasted heirloom winter squash with goat’s curd and caramelised pear in a honey and Tewkesbury mustard dressing

In Club World, passengers can dine on roasted heirloom winter squash with goat’s curd and caramelised pear in a honey and Tewkesbury mustard dressing

The brand new amuse bouche available to First passengers

The new cheese board, which is now on offer to First passengers

The brand new amuse bouche and cheese board that are both now available to First passengers 

The new afternoon tea offering, which is now available to Club Europe passengers flying from Gatwick

The new afternoon tea offering, which is now available to Club Europe passengers flying from Gatwick

New main courses in Club World include seared fillet of cod with butter beans, saffron, crispy chorizo and smoked paprika as well as ale-braised feather blade of British beef with chive mashed potatoes, horseradish dumplings and Chantenay carrots.

While those in First will be able to enjoy Onley Oak ribeye steak with vine cherry tomatoes, baby watercress and beef jus as well as roasted monkfish with tadka dal, pickled carrots and curry leaf and mustard coconut sauce.

Carolina Martinoli, British Airways’ director of brand and customer experience, said: ‘This is the latest development in continuously improving our catering.

‘We’re incredibly proud of this new offering, and we hope our customers enjoy it as much as we have enjoyed developing it.’

Fillet of cod with Keralan curry sauce, lemon and mustard seed rice and green beans, pictured, is on offer in World Traveller Plus

Fillet of cod with Keralan curry sauce, lemon and mustard seed rice and green beans, pictured, is on offer in World Traveller Plus

Braised British beef in ale hotpot, pictured, is one of the new additions to the menu in World Traveller Plus

Braised British beef in ale hotpot, pictured, is one of the new additions to the menu in World Traveller Plus

Economy passengers in World Traveller can enjoy chicken with roasted vegetables and creamy kale potato mash, pictured

Economy passengers in World Traveller can enjoy chicken with roasted vegetables and creamy kale potato mash, pictured 

In Club Europe (business short-haul), passengers can enjoy spinach and ricotta ravioli in a cherry tomato sauce with bocconcini and basil pesto

In Club Europe (business short-haul), passengers can enjoy spinach and ricotta ravioli in a cherry tomato sauce with bocconcini and basil pesto

In Club Europe, passengers can dine on Severn and Wye hot smoked salmon with curried rice and a free-range egg salad

In Club Europe, passengers can dine on Severn and Wye hot smoked salmon with curried rice and a free-range egg salad

BA flies to more than 70 destinations from Gatwick.

As part of a £6.5billion investment, the airline has refreshed its Boeing 777 fleet at Gatwick with ‘new generation’ economy and premium economy seats.

According to the carrier, these seats have ‘all-new Panasonic inflight entertainment 10-inch screens in World Traveller and 12-inch screens in World Traveller Plus, offering four times more choice, including movies, television and audio programmes’. 

BRITISH AIRWAYS’ NEW MENUS FROM GATWICK 

Club Europe main courses

Hampshire chalk stream trout gremolata, roasted new potatoes, fennel and dill sauce.

Poached free-range egg, grilled halloumi, potato and red onion hash with spiced beans.

Spinach and ricotta ravioli in a cherry tomato sauce with bocconcini and basil pesto.

Severn and Wye smoked salmon blinis with crème fraîche and keta caviar.

Seared fillet of cod with lemon and chive linguine in a tomato basil sauce

Club World starters

British cured Cumbrian ham with smoked aubergine purée and basil pesto.

Roasted heirloom winter squash, goat’s curd and caramelised pear in a honey and Tewkesbury mustard dressing.

Club World main courses

Seared fillet of cod, butter beans with saffron, crispy chorizo and smoked paprika.

Ale-braised feather blade of British beef with chive mashed potatoes, horseradish dumplings and Chantenay carrots.

Pan-fried Parmesan polenta with wild mushroom ragoût, wilted greens and savoury walnut granola.

First main courses

Onley Oak ribeye steak with vine cherry tomatoes, baby watercress and beef jus.

Roasted monkfish with tadka dal, pickled carrots and curry leaf and mustard coconut sauce.

Couple must leave their home of 12 years before it falls into the sea

Living on the EDGE: Couple must leave their home of 12 years before it falls into the sea after ‘cataclysmic’ cliff erosion left them just 30ft from disaster

  • Author Julie Blaxland, 55, thought her clifftop home in Easton Bavants, Suffolk, would be safe for five years
  • But ‘cataclysmic’ erosion caused by recent storms has left the rented farm property just 30ft from disaster
  • She and husband  Giles Stibbe, 60, have been told to move out straight away and the home will be demolished

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A couple have been ordered to leave their home after more than 10 feet of land fell into the sea last week, leaving the property precariously close to a cliff edge.

After the 3.5-metre section fell away overnight in a ‘cataclysmic event’ last week, engineers concluded a row of three cottages in Easton Bavants in East Suffolk was now 10 metres from the cliff, and unsafe.

Juliet Blaxland, 55, and her husband Giles Stibbe, 60, will now move home next week despite saying as recently as September that they thought her home, one the furthest east in the UK, would be safe for at least five years.

Until recently Ms Blaxland’s home looked reasonably safe from the encroaching North Sea but now has been deemed unsafe 

But violent autumn storms, alongside big tides, triggered a dramatic increase in erosion, with nine metres of land lost in the past four months.

Juliet told the Mirror: ‘We knew all along it would eventually be demolished but it has caught us by surprise, as we could have reasonably expected another year here.

 ‘But ever since we moved in we were always aware of how little time we had left.

‘Demolition is incredibly sad. It’s the end of an era.’

Juliet wrote a book, The Easternmost House, about life at the edge of East Anglia in a home will now be razed to the ground

Juliet wrote a book, The Easternmost House, about life at the edge of East Anglia in a home will now be razed to the ground

She said that the house is a ‘landmark’ in Easton Bavents, East Suffolk.

The community, which lies just north of Southwold has been decimated by the incoming tide, with erosion undermining the hamlet which used to have a church, a thriving market and many houses. 

Juliet and Army veteran Giles moved in 12 years ago, renting from the local farmer.

Since then the land separating them and the sea has disappeared, with the loss of several houses wich have been safely demolished.

The shocking speed at which one of the UK's most iconic coastlines is vanishing is revealed in photos taken over two decades

The shocking speed at which one of the UK’s most iconic coastlines is vanishing is revealed in photos taken over two decades

Mike Page, 79, has created a unique aerial archive showing the alarming erosion of land along the coast of East Anglia

Mike Page, 79, has created a unique aerial archive showing the alarming erosion of land along the coast of East Anglia

This photo set shows how the sea has encroached closer and closer to this facility over the course of the last few years

This photo set shows how the sea has encroached closer and closer to this facility over the course of the last few years

Engineers have now told the farm owner that all cottage tenants should leave – with demolition crews expected to raze the homes over Christmas.

The couple are moving to the coastal village of Benacre, which also suffers from arosion, but they believe their new home is safe from teh sea for now.

Coastal Partnership East, a group formed by several local councils, has been monitoring the situation.

A spokesman said: ‘Since the 2018 Beast from the East storms we have seen significant lowering of beaches along the Norfolk and Suffolk coasts.

‘Last month, weather events and high astronomical tides caused unexpected, rapid erosion at Easton Bavents. The situation is critical and people living in cliff-top properties are at risk.’

German family who own Krispy Kreme and Pret A Manger giving millions to Holocaust survivors

Albert Reimann Sr (pictured) was a Nazi supporter who used forced labourers 

The German billionaire owners of Krispy Kreme Doughnuts and Pret A Manger are donating millions to Holocaust survivors to atone for their family’s use of forced labour and support of Adolf Hitler during the Nazi era.

The Reimann family is giving £4.2million (5m euros) to the Conference on Jewish Material Claims Against Germany to help thousands of elderly survivors around the world. 

Its JAB Investors company also plans to provide another £4.2million to find and support forced labourers used by its predecessor under the Nazis. 

An additional £21million (25m euros) will be donated annually to Holocaust education and promoting democratic values to fight the rise of populist nationalism.

The family established the Alfred Landecker Foundation in Berlin to oversee the efforts, named after a German Jew who was killed by the Nazis and – remarkably – whose grandchildren have a combined 45 per cent stake in JAB.

‘To confront this was quite an emotional wake-up call for the family,’ David Kamenetzky, board chairman of both the foundation and JAB Investors, said in a telephone interview from Washington ahead of Thursday’s planned announcement.

The £4.2million dedicated to the Claims Conference’s existing emergency assistance program will be distributed through some 200 welfare agencies over the next three years, said Greg Schneider, executive vice president of the conference.

‘It will have a huge impact on the lives of the poorest Holocaust survivors around the world,’ he added.

This year some 10,500 survivors, average age 83, were helped through short-term financial crises by the program in 34 countries. 

The additional funding will allow for increased payments, or some 3,000 more survivors to receive assistance, with the Claims Conference and partner agencies taking on the administrative costs themselves.

The announcement comes after the Reimann family earlier this year released initial details from a report it had commissioned on its own Nazi past.

Luxembourg-based JAB, worth £16.9 billion (20 billion euros), grew out of Benckiser, an industrial chemicals company run by Albert Reimann Sr. and Albert Reimann Jr., Nazi party members who died in 1954 and 1984 respectively.

The Reimann family firm owns Pret A Manger and and Krispy Kreme and is worth £16.9 billion

The Reimann family firm owns Pret A Manger and and Krispy Kreme and is worth £16.9 billion

The Reimanns are donating £10million to help Holocaust survivors around the world

The Reimanns are donating £10million to help Holocaust survivors around the world

Today, in addition to Krispy Kreme Doughnuts and Pret a Manger, the conglomerate has controlling stakes in the Dr. Pepper Snapple Group, Keurig Green Mountain, Peet’s Coffee & Tea, Caribou Coffee Co., Panera Bread and other companies.

Immediately after World War II, Reimann Sr. and Jr. were investigated by the occupying Allied powers and initially banned by the French from continuing their business activities. The judgment was then overturned by the Americans.

Neither talked about the Nazi era, according to the family, but after coming across documents they had kept, the younger generation began to ask questions and commissioned a University of Munich historian in 2014 to examine the family’s past more thoroughly.

He uncovered documents in Germany, France and the U.S. that revealed Albert Reimann Sr. and Albert Reimann Jr. used Russian civilians and French POWs as forced labourers, and were early supporters of the Nazi party, including donating to the paramilitary SS even before Hitler came to power.

Researchers have so far identified 838 people who were forced to work for Benckiser during the war, Kamenetzky said. 

None were Jewish or were sent to Benckiser as slave laborers from concentration camps.

The Reimann family have set up the Alfred Landecker Foundation - named after a German Jew who was killed by the Nazis, possibly in the Belzec concentration camp (pictured)

The Reimann family have set up the Alfred Landecker Foundation – named after a German Jew who was killed by the Nazis, possibly in the Belzec concentration camp (pictured)

Efforts are underway to locate those who might still be alive, not only to offer financial assistance but also to ask them to talk about their experiences, he said.

‘We have a commitment to look into the history,’ Kamenetzky said.

That history also includes Alfred Landecker, a Jewish German World War I veteran who was killed by the Nazis, likely either in the Sobibor or Belzec death camp.

In a remarkable twist, Albert Reimann Jr. – the dedicated Nazi – ended up having three children with Emilie Landecker, the daughter of Alfred Landecker, whose Catholic wife died in 1928.

Landecker had all three of his children baptized Catholic, and by the time the Gestapo came for him in 1942 Emilie Landecker was already working as a clerk for Reimann Jr. – the same man who in 1937 wrote a letter personally to SS leader Heinrich Himmler declaring ‘we are a purely Aryan family business.’

Emilie Landecker continued to work for the company after the war. Though it’s not clear when she and Reimann Jr. started their affair, they had their first child together in 1951, followed by two more. Reimann Jr., who had no children with his wife, adopted all three in 1965. Two of them are now among four shareholders in JAB Investors. The third is uninvolved.

With an eye on the events that led to the killing of their grandfather and 6 million other Jews, the annual 25 million euro funding through the foundation will focus on programs aimed at fighting anti-Semitism, protecting minorities, and strengthening democracies against populism and nationalism.

The family named the foundation after Alfred Landecker, both as a tribute to him and to ensure the focus was not on JAB Investors or the Benckiser company, Kamenetzky said.

‘Of everything that came out of this, the 10 million, the 25 million, the most important thing is the naming,’ he said. ‘The naming is a true statement.’ 

 

City watchdog confirms it’s looking into equity release

Sarah Davidson, of This is Money

Sarah Davidson, of This is Money, writes: There is no direct evidence that advisers are deliberately pushing older mortgage borrowers into taking more expensive equity release loans.

Anecdotally, though, I sometimes hear the suggestion that some advisers may not be as independent as they should. 

I have been told by more than one industry insider that the first question some  retirement advisers ask an older borrower when they’re looking for a mortgage is: ‘Would you be prepared to lose your home?’ 

This can be a leading way of opening this kind of advice discussion. 

A mortgage, either repayment or interest-only, has the contingent risk of your home being repossessed if you do not keep up with monthly payments. 

This isn’t true for equity release and lifetime mortgages because there are no monthly payments, instead interest is rolled into the loan. 

But there’s a pay-off for that security of tenure, and it’s the cost of the loan. Rates may be lower than ever in the lifetime mortgage but the fact that interest is compounded means borrowers end up owing considerably more. 

For many equity release may still be the right choice, but consumers need to be safe in the knowledge that their adviser will carefully consider both options. A good trusted specialist financial adviser will do.

The elephant in the room is also that there is the potential for a commission bias that is creating an advice gap. 

Mortgage brokers and equity release advisers both earn commission from lenders when they successfully complete a mortgage application for a client. 

Mortgage brokers get paid somewhere in the region of 0.35 and 0.5 per cent of the mortgage amount when completing a retirement interest-only mortgage. On a £100,000 loan they’d receive £350 to £500. 

Equity release brokers are also paid commission, but they can get a considerably larger 3.5 per cent of the loan amount. On a £100,000 loan that is £3,500. 

The basic principle behind giving mortgage advice is to help the customer get the best solution to their problem. 

But, the adviser has to have permission from the regulator to tell clients if that’s either a retirement interest-only mortgage or a lifetime mortgage, equity release in other words. 

Generally speaking, mortgage brokers are not qualified to advise on equity release, so they refer them to retirement specialists. 

It’s therefore equity release advisers who are in the best position to tell customers whether to take a lifetime mortgage or a retirement interest-only mortgage. 

Therein lies the problem. 

It is very hard to argue there is no commission bias for the adviser if by recommending a retirement interest-only mortgage to the customer they earn £500 but by saying you should get a lifetime mortgage, they’ll pocket £3,500.  

While the FCA hasn’t said its investigation covers this point, it’s likely that they will be asking firms to justify themselves. 

This is long overdue and, if it results in the scrapping of this bias it will be very welcome.  



THIRD director quits Prince Andrew’s Dragons’ Den-style scheme for entrepreneurs

THIRD director quits Prince Andrew’s Dragons’ Den-style scheme for entrepreneurs in wake of disastrous Newsnight interview as Hong Kong-based German investor resigns

  • German investor David Stern, 41, resigned from director role at [email protected]
  • The investor, based in Hong Kong , follows departure of two other directors
  • They stepped down days after Duke of York’s disastrous Newsnight interview 
  • Prince Andrew’s Dragons Den style scheme was set up to help entrepreneurs 

Prince Andrew‘s Dragon’s Den style project for entrepreneurs has lost a third director after a private investor resigned.

David Stern, 41, a German investor based in Hong Kong, is listed as having officially resigned from [email protected] on December 10, it is reported. 

It follows the departure of fellow directors Mark Eaves and Hanadi Jabado on November 19, just three days after the broadcast of Andrew’s disastrous Newsnight interview.

The Duke of York did not attend a [email protected] event last night, the first one since he was TV grilling on his relationship with peadophile financier Jeffrey Epstein.

David Stern

The Dragon’s Den style scheme [email protected] has moved out of Buckingham Palace for its first event since the car crash Newsnight interview featuring Prince Andrew (left). It has emerged that investor David Stern (right) has resigned as a director of the scheme

A senior source within the organisation told The Times that he was unsure why Mr Stern or Mr Eaves had quit or whether the duke himself would continue with [email protected] ‘It’s in flux,’ the source said. ‘It’s for him to decide.’ 

Mr Stern is a serial investor who also has links to the royal family through St George’s House, a networking organisation founded by the Duke of Edinburgh and based at Windsor Castle, the paper reports.  

The source said Ms Jabado had resigned to concentrate on [email protected] CIC, a ‘community interest company’ that she has served as a director since May 2015. 

The event was due to take place at Buckingham Palace, but was relocated to the Corinthia Hotel in central London at the last minutes, sources said. 

It was described on the organisation’s website as a ‘final’ in which 15 entrepreneurs pitch their ideas to potential investors.

Last night's Pitch@Palace event was moved from Buckingham Palace to the Corinthia Hotel (pictured) in central London

Last night’s [email protected] event was moved from Buckingham Palace to the Corinthia Hotel (pictured) in central London

The duke (pictured) is facing continued backlash over his friendship with billionaire paedophile Jeffrey Epstein

Jeffrey Epstein

The duke (left) is facing continued backlash over his friendship with billionaire paedophile Jeffrey Epstein (right)

Investors were reported to have received a text from the Duke’s private secretary Amanda Thirsk saying the venue had changed at the last minute. She claimed it was due to the General Election. Buckingham Palace has not commented.

The prince agreed to withdraw from public duty in the wake of the car crash TV appearance, but initially wanted to remain a figurehead for [email protected], some 200 charities and other affiliations after 

At the end of his disastrous Newsnight interview with Emily Maitlis said he planned to continue with [email protected] and his other business schemes.

But he was forced to back down afters several sponsors made it clear they no longer wanted his backing. The organisation is believed to be dropping ‘Palace’ from its name.

At least 23 organisations have either dropped the Duke or accepted his resignation, including the English National Ballet, the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra and the Outward Bound Trust.

In the immediate fallout, one of the country’s leading accountancy firms, KPMG, revealed it had stopped sponsoring [email protected] to protect its reputation.

KPMG bosses decided to end the relationship last month due to ‘unsavoury’ issues stemming from the Duke’s friendship with Epstein.

The firm was a founding partner and had paid up to £100,000 a year in sponsorship since 2014.

Several other major companies and charities said they were also considering their links with Andrew in the wake of his extraordinary television interview about the Jeffrey Epstein scandal.

The pharmaceutical giant Astrazeneca said it was reviewing its relationship with [email protected], while insurance firm Aon asked for its name be removed from the scheme’s website.

Aon sources insisted that the company is not associated with the Duke’s scheme and that the supposed relationship had been publicised in error.