Princess Diana’s chef reveals she let Prince Harry eat 50p-sized treacle tart for breakfast

Carolyn Robb shares her tiny treacle tart recipe that has the royal seal of approval

For the orange pastry, you will need:

120g (4oz) butter

2 tbsp golden caster sugar

240g (8oz) plain flour

zest of 1 orange see method

1 medium free-range egg yolk

4 tbsp cold water

For the filling, you will need:  

400g (14oz) golden syrup

150g (5½ oz) fresh white breadcrumbs

zest of 1 lemon see method

1 tbsp freshly squeezed lemon juice

2 tbsp double cream

Method 

1. First make the orange pastry: in a food processor, combine the butter, sugar and flour and process until it resembles breadcrumbs. Grate the orange zest directly into the bowl. Add the egg yolk and a little of the water, while pulsing the food processor on and off. Continue adding the water until the dough comes together, but be careful not to overprocess or the pastry will be tough when cooked.

2. Remove the pastry from the food processor and, on a lightly floured board, bring it together into a ball. Wrap and chill for 20 minutes.

3. While it is chilling, warm the golden syrup in a small heavy-based saucepan – do not let it boil. Remove from the heat, add the breadcrumbs and grate the lemon zest in. Leave it to sit so that the crumbs absorb the golden syrup and swell.

4. Remove the pastry from the refrigerator and roll it out on a floured board to a thickness of about 3mm (⅛ in). Cut out circles to line 20 of the cupcake moulds (or muffin tins or tartlet moulds) and press the pastry down well into each mould. Chill for a further 15 minutes.

5. Preheat the oven to 180C/350F/gas 4.

6. Add the freshly squeezed lemon juice and double cream to the golden syrup and breadcrumb mixture.

7. Place a little filling in each tartlet.

8. Decorate the top of each one with tiny pastry shapes or a lattice of very thin pastry strips (as many as you can fit). You can also personalise them by putting names or initials on the top using pastry letters.

9. Bake for 15-18 minutes. Cool in the moulds for 10 minutes before removing.

10. Serve warm with whipped cream, custard or ice cream, or just pop one in your mouth fresh from the oven.

This recipe makes 20 small tarts.

Wedding guest slammed after proposing ‘tacky’ dress that would upstage the bride

Wedding guest slammed by online critics for ‘tacky’ and ‘inappropriate’ bodycon dress that would upstage the bride – but do YOU agree?

  • Woman from the UK, shared controversial dress to her friends on Facebook
  • The item in question is a black bodycon dress with revealing cut out sides 
  • Many slammed the outfit as ‘tacky’ and ‘trashy’ and said it’d be suited to a club 

A woman has been slammed on social media for proposing a possible dress to wear to a friend’s wedding – with many deeming it ‘inappropriate.’ 

For any wedding guest, buying a dress that doesn’t take too much attention away from the bride or blend in too much with the bridesmaids is a tricky task. 

But one brave lady, from the UK, was expecting to get the go ahead for her chosen outfit – and received a whole load of criticism instead.  

Posting alongside an image of the black bodycon dress, which features cut out sides, she asked whether it would be ‘too much’ – and people didn’t hold back on their opinions. 

‘Is the wedding at a nightclub? Is it some wild 18+ party thing? Because then maybe, otherwise it’d just be really out of place and awkward,’ criticised one, while another agreed: ‘This would definitely be great for a club or bar, not a wedding.’ 

A woman has been slammed on social media for proposing a possible dress to wear to a friend’s wedding – with many deeming it ‘inappropriate’

Taking to the Facebook page, the woman explained: ‘Have to attend a wedding in about three weeks. I own this dress and I’ve never worn it yet.

‘Is it too much for a wedding? Or is it possibly appropriate?’

The picture of the daring dress in question was then shared in a Wedding Shaming group and the negative feedback quickly ensued.

Many found even the question offensive and weren’t afraid to express what they really thought.

In the original post (above), the lady explained: 'I have to attend a wedding in about three weeks. I own this dress and I've never worn it yet. 'Is it too much for a wedding? Or is it possibly appropriate?'

In the original post (above), the lady explained: ‘I have to attend a wedding in about three weeks. I own this dress and I’ve never worn it yet. ‘Is it too much for a wedding? Or is it possibly appropriate?’

Many women slammed the proposed outfit. 'Is the wedding at a nightclub? Is it some wild 18+ party thing? Because then maybe, otherwise it'd just be really out of place and awkward,' criticised one, while another agreed: 'This would definitely be great for a club or bar, not a wedding'

Many women slammed the proposed outfit. ‘Is the wedding at a nightclub? Is it some wild 18+ party thing? Because then maybe, otherwise it’d just be really out of place and awkward,’ criticised one, while another agreed: ‘This would definitely be great for a club or bar, not a wedding’

‘That dress would be cute for a stripper,’ read one particularly harsh comment, while another penned: ‘What a tacky, cheap dress. Completely inappropriate for a wedding! Even a meal out it’s inappropriate.’

Another waded in on the debate and commented: ‘Even in my 20s, when I was in my physical prime I’d never wear that to a wedding. It’s tacky, tasteless and doesn’t belong as a wedding. Like, have some common sense.’  

Meanwhile, one lady had a completely different take on the outfit and wrote: ‘I definitely wouldn’t mind this at my wedding. I mean, it’s a party, right? So what’s the big deal?’

Another in agreement said: ‘I 100 per cent agree with you. It’s a party dress and we’ve having a party. Way too many people view their wedding as their super serious affair full of meaning and ritual.’

‘Outside of the bride and groom and maybe their parents, no one is taking your wedding that seriously. Just lighten up and try and have a good time.’ 

A third admitted: ‘If I had that body I’d wear it.’ 

One in favour of the dress wrote: 'I 100 per cent agree with you. It's a party dress and we've having a party. Way too many people view their wedding as their super serious affair full of meaning and ritual'

One in favour of the dress wrote: ‘I 100 per cent agree with you. It’s a party dress and we’ve having a party. Way too many people view their wedding as their super serious affair full of meaning and ritual’

Don’t laugh, but I’ve watched Bohemian Rhapsody 12 times: BONNIE ESTRIDGE on life with Alzheimer’s  

I have a new favourite phrase: ‘Where is my…’ It is usually said while I’m stomping around the house, hissing and cursing. Don’t get me wrong, I know how annoying it is. Both my daughters – when they lived with us – and my husband Chris often seemed unable to leave the house without first rushing around trying to find their keys, bag, wallet, you name it.

Before you say it’s a family trait, I usually knew where they’d put it: right slap bang in the middle of the kitchen table. Not there, I’d say? Try your coat pocket. And so on.

Now I’m the one completely unable to find that wretched mobile phone. Or dog lead. Or, today, my bobble hat.

In other news, I’m obsessed with Bohemian Rhapsody, the new Queen biopic. Seriously. Chris and I went to see it at the cinema with our friends Liz and Nick. And then when I got home, I downloaded it and watched it again. And again. I think I’ve now watched it ten times. I don’t really remember a lot of it, so it’s just as enjoyable every time

My consultant says the reason I like seeing the same film over and over comes back down to routines: it is comforting for those of us with the A Word, when things are familiar. Personally, I think I just love the music. So who knows

My consultant says the reason I like seeing the same film over and over comes back down to routines: it is comforting for those of us with the A Word, when things are familiar. Personally, I think I just love the music. So who knows

Half the time, even when the house phone rings I have a hard time locating it. I’m convinced things are moving of their own accord.

To make matters worse, Chris has decided the house needs completely redecorating. We’re having parts remodelled. Walls moved. New kitchen, new bathrooms. The lot.

The renovations have given Chris something to really get stuck into. But I didn’t want to do it.

I never liked change at the best of times. And now I like it even less. It’s most discombobulating – and that’s a word that sums up Alzheimer’s beautifully.

If you want to know what it’s like: have you ever parked in a car park you’ve never been to, and then come back hours later and really had no idea where your car is? That sudden, blank feeling of not knowing something no matter how hard you try? The memory is just not there. That’s what it’s like for me. On a regular basis.

I spoke to my neurologist, Professor Peter Garrard, at St George’s Hospital, Tooting, about it all.

He said Alzheimer’s means my ability to make and store new memories is ‘weaker’.

That means remembering day-to-day events that help us all get around – knowing where you left an object, or how to get from A to B – is more difficult. He suggests keeping a regular timetable and sticking to a routine, and not putting myself in unfamiliar situations.

As I’ve reported previously, I got lost while driving myself to the dentist last year. It was a journey I’d done dozens of times, but not regularly enough, according to Prof Garrard, for it to stick in my memory.

The A Word has claimed that small piece of information, along with many others.

So I stick to places I know well. I walk my dog Benny or pop down to the shops. And I’m sure I’ll get used to the new house.

In other news, I’m obsessed with Bohemian Rhapsody, the new Queen biopic. Seriously.

Chris and I went to see it at the cinema with our friends Liz and Nick. And then when I got home, I downloaded it and watched it again. And again. I think I’ve now watched it ten times. I don’t really remember a lot of it, so it’s just as enjoyable every time.

I was talking to a friend about the film, and my days as a showbiz reporter days came flooding back: going round to Kenny Everett’s house in Kensington to do an interview

I was talking to a friend about the film, and my days as a showbiz reporter days came flooding back: going round to Kenny Everett’s house in Kensington to do an interview

 

In my head, I sort of know what happens. But if you asked me to tell you the plot, I wouldn’t be able to. Even stranger, I was talking to a friend about the film, and my days as a showbiz reporter days came flooding back: going round to Kenny Everett’s house in London to do an interview.

Kenny’s wife – yes, he was married back then – Lee was there. She was a psychic of some kind and did a reading for me, as I sat on their living room floor. Remarkably, she knew my dad was about to go on holiday.

And of course, Kenny appeared as a character in the Queen film, because he was the first radio DJ to play their single Bohemian Rhapsody.

I know it happened because I checked with Chris, who worked with me as a photographer back in the 1970s.  

Prof Garrard says the reason I like seeing the same film over and over comes back down to routines: it is comforting for those of us with the A Word, when things are familiar.

Personally, I think I just love the music. So who knows.

I suppose I’m a bit like Benny, who will endlessly play with a toy that he loves. Then he’ll drop it somewhere, and come up to me whining – he can’t remember where he put it. Off we go to find it, and then he goes back to playing with it again.

Well, you know what they say about dogs and their owners…

Sisters diagnosed with rare cancer within weeks of each other reveal only one of them will survive

Two sisters who were both diagnosed with the same rare aggressive cancer within weeks of each other have told of their heartbreak that only one of them is likely to beat the killer disease.

After finding a lump in her left breast in May 2017, Julia Gailes, 48, from Consett, County Durham, was waiting for test results when her sibling Wendy Moffett, 57, discovered an identical lump in her right boob.

Not wanting to worry her little sister, Wendy, from Bishop Auckland, secretly had tests of her own and was diagnosed with the same cancer as Julia, just five weeks later. 

The pair both had single mastectomies two months apart, and Julia went on to have chemotherapy and radiotherapy.

Julia Gailes, pictured left, and her sister Wendy Moffett, 57, pictured right, were both diagnosed with the same rare aggressive cancer within weeks of each other

They supported each other throughout 18 months of treatment, calling regularly and sending text messages to boost each other’s spirits.

But when Julia received the news she was in remission, Wendy was told she couldn’t have chemotherapy due to a weak heart.

Just 10 months after her sister was given the all clear, Wendy was informed her cancer was terminal and she had one year to live.

Despite their starkly different prognoses, the pair are closer than ever and threw a joint party to celebrate life.

Married mum-of-three Julia said: ‘It’s felt like the luck of the draw – obviously I’d rather we’d not had it, but if I was going to go through this with anyone it’s Wendy.

‘I can feel well for myself – but knowing that I’m going to be okay when Wendy will not be has been too much to bear.’

Wendy (pictured in 1985 stood with sister Julia, who is holding Wendy's daughter Sarah) was informed her cancer was terminal and she had one year to live in January this year

Wendy (pictured in 1985 stood with sister Julia, who is holding Wendy’s daughter Sarah) was informed her cancer was terminal and she had one year to live in January this year

‘I didn’t think when I was diagnosed that it would be what got me in the end. But at least I’ve had Julia,’ said grandmother-of-four Wendy, a former end of life carer.

‘I know it’s been hard on Julia, because she’s surviving when I’m not. But it’s okay. I’m not fed up, I’m not angry, I’m not overly upset – it’s just happened.’

Shop worker Julia found a lump in her left breast when she happened to brush her hand across it, and was diagnosed later that month.

Unbeknownst to her, Wendy was secretly waiting for her biopsy results after finding similar lumps on her right breast following a regular check-up.

Though Wendy knew about Julia’s diagnosis, she didn’t tell her sister she might also have cancer because she didn’t want to stress her out during her ordeal.

‘I didn’t want to alarm her – but we’re such close sisters that afterwards I felt silly for not having told her straight away,’ explained Wendy.

As well as a single mastectomy, Julia went on to have chemotherapy and radiotherapy and is now in remission

As well as a single mastectomy, Julia went on to have chemotherapy and radiotherapy and is now in remission

Five weeks after Julia’s diagnosis, in July 2017, Wendy was told that she too had triple negative breast cancer – the exact same strain of the disease.

Julia and Wendy, a mum-of-three, are two of 8,000 women in the UK this year alone who will contract the condition, according to Breast Cancer Care.

This vein of cancer is not fuelled by oestrogen and progesterone, which means it doesn’t respond to hormonal therapy medicines.

Triple negative breast cancer cells produce too much of the HER2 protein, meaning that cells divide too quickly and the cancer is more likely to spread and to recur.

It can only be treated with surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy.

Though Wendy and Julia had genetic tests to see if the disease is hereditary, there’s no risk for their children.

Julia (pictured left) and Wendy (right) are two of 8,000 women in the UK this year alone who will contract triple negative breast cancer, according to Breast Cancer Care

Julia (pictured left) and Wendy (right) are two of 8,000 women in the UK this year alone who will contract triple negative breast cancer, according to Breast Cancer Care

Wendy was treated at Darlington Hospital at the same time that Julia was being treated in Hexham – and both sisters lost one breast each.

Julia’s breast was removed in December 2017, after she had a failed lumpectomy, while Wendy had her mastectomy in August 2017 because she couldn’t have intensive treatment.

Julia had an aggressive first round of chemotherapy between May and October in 2017, 15 days radiotherapy in February, and another six months of chemotherapy from March.

Wendy had already fought off breast cancer five years earlier, so could only have five days of radiotherapy due to her intense treatment the first time round.

She also has dilated cardiomyopathy, which reduces the heart’s ability to pump blood – and which stopped her from having chemotherapy.

‘Because I’d had that cancer, though, and I’d had the radiotherapy back then, the doctor said I could only really have five days’ extra treatment,’ she said.

Though Wendy and Julia had genetic tests to see if the disease is hereditary, thankfully there's no risk for their children

Though Wendy and Julia had genetic tests to see if the disease is hereditary, thankfully there’s no risk for their children

‘My weak heart means I’ve never had chemo.’

Julia went into remission and was declared free of triple negative in March 2018.

But Wendy’s health took an unfortunate turn for the worst.

Just days after her mastectomy in August 2017, she had a massive heart attack.

She was rushed to a coronary clinic before being immediately transferred to The James Cook University Hospital in Middlesbrough for one month.

Wendy was then fitted with a pacemaker and defibrillator – which she said has set her back enormously and slowed her down.

‘Heart failures put everything on hold,’ she explained. ‘I can’t move or stand as much as I used to now. I’ll never get back to how I was before.’ 

Wendy found more cancerous growths on her surgical scars and down her back in September 2018.

How to check your breasts 

Look out for:

Changes in skin texture for example puckering/dimpling

This is why it is so important to feel AND look at you r boobs. Dimpling and puckering of the skin can look similar to orange peel.

Swelling in your armpit or around your collarbone 

It is important to check not just your boob but your upper chest and armpit too, as these areas also contain breast tissue.

Nipple discharge 

This is liquid that comes from the nipple without squeezing it.

A sudden, unusual change in shape or shape 

Most women may naturally have one boob bigger than the other or experience their boobs gradually changing as they get older.

Many changes are perfectly normal, however if you notice a sudden, unusual change in size or shape then get it checked out.

Nipple inversion and changes in direction 

All this means is your nipple has become pulled into the boob or looks different to usual. This could be a change in its position or shape. That’s why it is important to pay special attention to your nipple during your regular checks.

A rash or crusting of the nipple or surrounding area 

There are many reasons why your skin could become irritated, especially if you are breast feeding, but if you notice any redness or a rash on the skin and/or around the nipple or any crusting of the nipple, make sure you get it checked out by your doctor.

What to feel for:

Lumps and thickening 

Some boobs are naturally lumpy and this can be perfectly normal. The key is to get to know how your boobs feel, so you would notice if any new lumps appear or if your boob starts to feel thicker in one area compared to the rest

Constant, unusual pain in your breast or armpit 

Some breast pain can be perfectly normal, especially around your period. But keep an eye out for any unexplained pain in your breast or your armpit that’s there all or almost all of the time

Source: CoppaFeel!

She was diagnosed with secondary cancer – which was ‘treatable but incurable’ – in October after it spread to her lungs.

Doctors said in January this year she was terminal, and she was given 12 months to live.

But Wendy has remained positive – and in sisterly style is more worried about her sibling than herself.

‘Julia was able to have a round of chemo, followed by a round of radiotherapy, and another round of chemo, and it looks, on that basis, like the treatment obviously worked,’ said Wendy.

‘But because of what’s happened to me, it’s something that she will always have hanging over her.

‘She’ll be thinking, “Will it come back?” I know she’s wondering.

Wendy, pictured left with brother Nigel and Julia in the pram in 1972, has remained positive - and in true sisterly style is more worried about her sibling than herself

Wendy, pictured left with brother Nigel and Julia in the pram in 1972, has remained positive – and in true sisterly style is more worried about her sibling than herself

‘We’ve chatted loads about it and at the back of her mind, she knows that she’s beaten the cancer – at least, for now. She’s thinking a lot about if it grows back, like it did for me. 

‘I know I would be the same if I had beaten it and Julia was diagnosed with secondary cancer. It’s something that you can never put out of your mind.’

Julia, who cares for her autistic son Lewis, nine, and her father James, 79, who has vascular dementia, said she checks every day that her tumours haven’t returned.

‘I’m not confident it won’t come back,’ said Julia, who has husband Andrew, 50.

‘Although they told me that I’m cancer free, I still check along my scars every day for little lumps.

‘This particular cancer is so aggressive, and because it returned along Wendy’s scar lines I’m checking all the time.

While Julia went into remission and was declared free of triple negative in March 2018, Wendy found more cancerous growths on her surgical scars and down her back in September 2018 and is now terminally ill

While Julia went into remission and was declared free of triple negative in March 2018, Wendy found more cancerous growths on her surgical scars and down her back in September 2018 and is now terminally ill

‘Every time I cough, I think there might be a speck in my lungs. I’m petrified.

‘I can’t go through chemo again. It was horrific. Thinking about the cancer returning moves me to tears.’

She’s found it hard to accept that Wendy will not survive the same cancer that she has now been declared free of. 

Julia and Wendy threw a gala in March and raised £5,000 for Breast Cancer Care. Through her Facebook blog, Julia’s Jugs’ Journey, she raised £2,500.

Despite the immense trials she has faced, Wendy is taking each day as it comes. 

‘There’s no rage, I don’t feel unlucky – I’ve accepted it,’ explained Wendy.

‘My focus is on every month – I like to think that I’m a glass half full person. I won’t go down without a fight.’

Princess Anne wraps up warm in a navy coat and matching beanie in Dublin

Wrap up warm! Princess Anne braves the chilly weather in a navy coat and matching beanie as she travels around Dublin visiting Ireland’s oldest lighthouses

  • Princess Anne, 68, travelled to the Howth district of Dublin to see lighthouses 
  • She was shown around the country’s oldest structures during a weekend visit
  • It comes just days after her daughter Zara was spotted with the Cambridges

The Princess Royal was shown around some of Ireland’s oldest lighthouses during her weekend visit to the capital.

Princess Anne, 68, travelled to the Howth district of Dublin where lighthouses have guided ships at Baily since 1667.

During the guided tour, she then observed the comparatively younger 19th century Rockabill Lighthouse at Skerries and the Kish Lighthouse off Dublin Bay.

The Queen’s only daughter sported a navy coat, matching beanie and sunglasses as she explored the city. 

Princess Anne, 68, travelled to the Howth district of Dublin to see lighthouses during a weekend visit to the Irish capital 

Hosted by the Commissioners of Irish Lights, Anne met staff and heard about their work providing vital maritime safety services and modern navigation aids at its Dun Laoghaire headquarters.

She also toured the navigation vessel, ILV Granuaile during her two-day visit that began on Friday.

The mother-of-two was visiting in her role as Master of Trinity House as part of the ongoing 150-year relationship between Irish Lights and the Lighthouse Authorities of Great Britain and Ireland.

Irish Lights chief executive Yvonne Shields O’Connor said it was a ‘great privilege’ to host the royal.

The Queen's only daughter sported a navy coat, matching beanie and sunglasses as she explored Dublin. Hosted by the Commissioners of Irish Lights, Anne met staff and heard about their work providing vital maritime safety services and modern navigation aids at its Dun Laoghaire headquarters

The Queen’s only daughter sported a navy coat, matching beanie and sunglasses as she explored Dublin. Hosted by the Commissioners of Irish Lights, Anne met staff and heard about their work providing vital maritime safety services and modern navigation aids at its Dun Laoghaire headquarters

‘Not only have we a strong historical relationship with Trinity House and Northern Lighthouse Board, we have an essential day-to-day working relationship and warm ties of friendship,’ she said.

‘I am honoured to have this opportunity to showcase the vital work Irish Lights does, in particular with regard to providing essential safety services through the use of modern technology in visual and electronic navigation aids, as well as our Met and Coastal Data services.

She continued: ‘While our work is progressive and forward-focused, we are also immeasurably proud of our rich heritage and we are delighted that the Princess Royal’s visit has also included a trip to one of the very first lighthouses built by Irish Lights in 1814, the Baily Lighthouse.’

‘The Princess Royal is a great champion of the maritime sector and we appreciate her visit as a source of encouragement to our own work and in terms of strengthening the bonds between the three lighthouse authorities.’ 

'Not only have we a strong historical relationship with Trinity House and Northern Lighthouse Board, we have an essential day-to-day working relationship and warm ties of friendship,' Irish Lights chief executive Yvonne Shields O'Connor said. Pictured, Princess royal being shown around a lighthouse

‘Not only have we a strong historical relationship with Trinity House and Northern Lighthouse Board, we have an essential day-to-day working relationship and warm ties of friendship,’ Irish Lights chief executive Yvonne Shields O’Connor said. Pictured, Princess royal being shown around a lighthouse

It comes just a day after her granddaughter Mia Tindall was spotted on the shoulder’s of Prince William.

Mia, five, the daughter of Zara and Mike Tindall, was hoisted aloft by her mum’s cousin, the Duke of Cambridge, as she made a grab for his ears.

Wills appeared to wince as Mia clung on, perhaps fearing that he might end up like his father Prince Charles – who is often lampooned for his outsized lugs.

Not to be outdone, Mia’s cousin Princess Charlotte, three, took the high road too, on the shoulders of her mother, the Duchess of Cambridge, 37. Kate sported trendy tight black jeans and a Barbour quilted jacket. 

The Cambridges and Tindalls joined up to watch Zara, a former silver medal Olympian, compete in the trials on Friday.

Princess Anne's guided tour (above) comes just a day after her granddaughter Mia Tindall was spotted on the shoulder's of Prince William

Princess Anne’s guided tour (above) comes just a day after her granddaughter Mia Tindall was spotted on the shoulder’s of Prince William

Mia, five, the daughter of Zara and Mike Tindall, was hoisted aloft by her mum¿s cousin, the Duke of Cambridge, as she made a grab for his ears

Mia, five, the daughter of Zara and Mike Tindall, was hoisted aloft by her mum’s cousin, the Duke of Cambridge, as she made a grab for his ears