Seinfeld and Star Trek actor Richard Herd dies at age 87 after a battle with cancer

Seinfeld and Star Trek actor Richard Herd who also starred in the classic movie The China Syndrome dies at age 87 after a battle with cancer

Richard Herd has died at the age of 87 after a long battle with cancer.

The character actor passed away this week at his home in Los Angeles as family was around him, a rep told The Wrap on Tuesday.

The Massachusetts native had a long and fruitful career that included a role in the 1979 classic The China Syndrome with Jane Fonda but he may have been best known for his role on Seinfeld as George Costanza’s boss.

Sad loss for Hollywood: Richard Herd has died at the age of 87 after a long battle with cancer. Seen in 2015

The star worked on 11 episodes of the series that starred Jerry Seinfeld. His character as George’s boss, Mr. Wilhelm, when he worked at the Yankees is memorable.

Constanza was played by Jason Alexander, one of the leads of the series which aired from 1989 until 1998.  

Herd had said in the past it was ‘easy’ getting the part. 

A memorable appearance: The star may have been best known for his role on Seinfeld as George Costanza's boss at the Yankees; seen with Jason Alexander, right

A memorable appearance: The star may have been best known for his role on Seinfeld as George Costanza’s boss at the Yankees; seen with Jason Alexander, right

He had staying power: The star worked on 11 episodes of the series that starred Jerry Seinfeld. His character as George's boss, Mr. Wilhelm

He had staying power: The star worked on 11 episodes of the series that starred Jerry Seinfeld. His character as George’s boss, Mr. Wilhelm

‘It was fun. It was very inviting,’ he shared with The Hollywood Reporter.

‘And as I left, I turned around and said, “Look, I have to tell you this. I hope it doesn’t make a difference, but I’m a Red Sox fan.”

‘And they all threw their scripts at me. The next day they said, “Come on out and play with us.”‘

Other TV shows he appeared on were TJ Hooker and Star Trek, both which shared William Shatner at some point.

Another hit series: Herd with Adrian Zmed, William Shatner and Heather Locklear on TJ Hooker

Another hit series: Herd with Adrian Zmed, William Shatner and Heather Locklear on TJ Hooker

Herd’s Star Trek shows were Star Trek: The Next Generation, Star Trek: Voyager, and Star Trek: Renegades. 

And he was seen on Quantum Leap, Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman, NYPD Blue, M*A*S*H, The Rockford Files, The Feather and Father Gang, Golden Girls, Starsky & Hutch, The A-Team, Midnight Caller, Buffy the Vampire Slayer and The O.C.

And he hit the popular nighttime soaps like Dallas, Dynasty and Falcon’s Crest.

And in 1983 and 1984 he was in the TV series V playing as John, the Visitors’ Supreme Commander.

His spouse: The performer is survived by Patricia Crowder Herd (pictured in 2004), his wife of 40 years, as well as his son, daughter, and stepdaughter

His spouse: The performer is survived by Patricia Crowder Herd (pictured in 2004), his wife of 40 years, as well as his son, daughter, and stepdaughter

In 2007 he played J. Howard Marshall in The Anna Nicole Smith Story.

His film career was also vast and varied. His first big movie was The China Syndrome but he also worked on All The President’s Men and, much more recently, Get Out, as well as Clint Eastwood’s 2018 film The Mule.

His very first role was in 1970 in the movie Hercules in New York.

The performer is survived by Patricia Crowder Herd, his wife of 40 years, as well as his son, daughter, and stepdaughter. 



Air pollution in China returns to high levels after falling during coronavirus lockdown in February 

Air pollution plummeted over China starting in February when the country enforced lockdowns due to the coronavirus, but new data reveals emissions have rebounded since orders were lifted in April.

NASA and European Space Agency (ESA) released images showing nitrogen levels from vehicles and industrial facilities have returned to near normal for this time of year.

Although there is a natural decline in the country after the holiday season, the traditional uptick was delayed because of the virus and continued to stay below long-term trends until the end of last month.

However, scientists have predicted improved air quality was not likely to remain, as human activity was eventually expected to return.

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NASA and European Space Agency (ESA) released images showing nitrogen levels from vehicles and industrial facilities have returned to near normal for this time of year. Pictured are levels captured from April through May

The data used to create the images include nitrogen dioxide levels in the central and eastern areas from February 10 through 25 (during the quarantine) and a second set that shows April 20 to May 12 (after restrictions were lifted)

Air pollution dropped significantly in China started in February when the country forced millions of people into their homes with the hopes of limiting the spread of the coronavirus.

The orders also mandated factories close, curbed electricity demand and dramatically cut down public transportation in major cities. 

During this time, NASA and ESA used pollution monitoring satellites to track the decrease in nitrogen dioxide in China starting in February and back two months prior. 

Nitrogen dioxide is a noxious gas that is released during fuel combustion and emitted by cars, power plants and industrial facilities.

It forms when fossil fuels such as coal, gas or diesel are burned at high temperatures and can cause a range of harmful effects on the lungs including increased inflammation of the airways and a greater risk of asthma attacks.

The data shows that most of the major cities including Shanghai, Xian and Yinchuan all had a spike (orange) in levels starting in April. However, there are areas outside of the city that continue to have the same levels (blue) as some parts are still quarantine

The data shows that most of the major cities including Shanghai, Xian and Yinchuan all had a spike (orange) in levels starting in April. However, there are areas outside of the city that continue to have the same levels (blue) as some parts are still quarantine

Although there is a natural decline in the country after the holiday season, the traditional uptick was delayed because of the virus and continued to stay below long-term trends until the end of last month

Although there is a natural decline in the country after the holiday season, the traditional uptick was delayed because of the virus and continued to stay below long-term trends until the end of last month

Scientists first noticed the difference around Wuhan, where the virus originated, after Chinese authorities shut down transport in and out of the city as well as businesses to quarantine the outbreak. 

Air quality researcher at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center Fei Liu said in February: ‘This is the first time I have seen such a dramatic drop-off over such a wide area for a specific event.’

The drop in nitrogen dioxide also coincided with Lunar New Year celebrations across China where businesses close from the last week of January into early February to celebrate the festival.

But Liu added how the reduction rate is more significant this year because it has lasted longer and there has not been an increase in nitrogen dioxide after the Lunar New Year.

China recently lifted lockdowns last month and new data shows that levels are near normal for this time of year.

NASA shared images following the lockdowns showing how emission levels had changed from January to February
Air pollution dropped significantly in China started in February (right) when the country forced millions of people into their homes with the hopes of limiting the spread of the coronavirus

Air pollution dropped significantly in China started in February (right) when the country forced millions of people into their homes with the hopes of limiting the spread of the coronavirus. NASA shared images following the lockdowns showing how emission levels had changed from January to February 

Maps released by NASA and ESA show levels of nitrogen dioxide in the troposphere, the lowest layer of the atmosphere, over China.

The data used to create the images include nitrogen dioxide levels in the central and eastern areas from February 10 through 25 (during the quarantine) and a second set that shows April 20 to May 12 (after restrictions were lifted). 

The data shows that most of the major cities including Shanghai, Xian and Yinchuan all had a spike in levels starting in April.

However, there are areas outside of the city that continue to have the same levels as some parts are still quarantined.

The coronavirus started in Wuhan December 2019 and has since infected nearly every country around the globe.

As of Tuesday, more than 5.4 million people have tested positive for the virus and the death toll has surpassed 346,000.

The coronavirus started in Wuhan December 2019 and has since infected nearly every country around the globe. As of Tuesday, more than 5.4 million people have tested positive for the virus and the death toll has surpassed 346,000

The coronavirus started in Wuhan December 2019 and has since infected nearly every country around the globe. As of Tuesday, more than 5.4 million people have tested positive for the virus and the death toll has surpassed 346,000

The Helsinki-based Center for Research on Energy and Clean Air (CREA) recently conducted a study that found that average levels of some pollutants rebounded once the policy was lifted and saw a huge spike in the past 30 days compared to the same period in 2019.

This was true of nitrogen dioxide, sulfur dioxide, and fine particulate matter, suggesting a rebound in industrial activity drove the trend, CREA said.

Overall passenger transport use in China remains lower year-on-year, but CREA said concerns about catching the coronavirus had led people to choose private cars over public transport as lockdowns eased, contributing to the rise in air pollution.



Coronavirus is most likely to spread between 41 and 59 degrees Fahrenheit, study finds

Coronavirus is most likely to spread between 41 and 59 degrees Fahrenheit, study finds

  • 60% of COVID-19 cases occurred in the temperature range, researchers said
  • They also warned of a second wave in autumn in big cities in middle latitudes
  • A Chinese university released the findings with a COVID-19 prediction platform
  • Here’s how to help people impacted by Covid-19

The novel coronavirus is most likely to spread in places with air temperatures between five and 15 degrees Celsius or 41 and 59 degrees Fahrenheit, a study has discovered.

More than half of the COVID-19 cases have occurred in such condition, according to Chinese researchers.

The team also warned of a second outbreak in autumn in big cities in middle latitudes. The region covers most of North America, Europe, Russia, China and part of Australia and South America.

More than half of the COVID-19 cases have occurred in places with air temperatures between five and 15 degrees Celsius, researchers from China’s Lanzhou University have discovered. Pictured, Chinese commuters wear protective masks at an intersection in Beijing on May 18

Lanzhou University in north-western China announced the findings yesterday as it released its COVID-19 pandemic global prediction platform

The researchers said they were hoping to better understand the virus’s transmission pattern by learning about the environment in which the killer pathogen could survive more easily.

Their research shows that the ideal temperatures for the virus’s transmission are between five and 15 degrees Celsius or 41 to 59 degrees Fahrenheit.

More than 60 per cent of the confirmed global COVID-19 infections were registered in the temperature range, according to a social media post from the university. 

The study was carried out based on the data of approximately 3.75million global confirmed COVID-19 cases in 185 countries and regions from January 21 to May 6, Xinhua reported. Pictured, people eat lunch behind protective plastic barriers in a cafeteria in Seoul on May 20

The study was carried out based on the data of approximately 3.75million global confirmed COVID-19 cases in 185 countries and regions from January 21 to May 6, Xinhua reported. Pictured, people eat lunch behind protective plastic barriers in a cafeteria in Seoul on May 20

The experts also found that the virus’s transmission rates were linked to an area’s humidity.

Around 73.8 per cent of the diagnosed cases were concentrated in regions with an absolute humidity of three to 10 grams in each cubic meter, said a report of the study from state news agency Xinhua.

The study was carried out based on the data of approximately 3.75million global confirmed COVID-19 cases in 185 countries and regions from January 21 to May 6, Xinhua added.

The coronavirus pandemic emerged in the Chinese city of Wuhan in December before sweeping across the world.

So far, more than 346,000 people have died of the disease, and around 5.5 million have caught the bug worldwide.

Chinese health authorities registered no new confirmed COVID-19 cases on Saturday, marking the first time it saw no daily rise since January. Pictured, people wear face masks to avoid catching coronavirus as they ride bicycles in the central business district in Beijing on May 26

Chinese health authorities registered no new confirmed COVID-19 cases on Saturday, marking the first time it saw no daily rise since January. Pictured, people wear face masks to avoid catching coronavirus as they ride bicycles in the central business district in Beijing on May 26

Chinese health authorities registered no new confirmed COVID-19 cases on Saturday, marking the first time it saw no daily rise in the number of native or imported infections since authorities began reporting data in January. 

Seven people were diagnosed with the deadly disease on Monday. All of them were classified as ‘imported cases’, people who bring the virus into China from overseas, said the country’s national health commission today. 

According to official figures, 4,643 people in China have lost their lives in the pandemic and 82,992 have contracted the illness.

More than 80 per cent of the country’s COVID-19 deaths took place in Wuhan, the former epicentre of the pandemic, authorities said.



Coronavirus is most likely to spread between five and 15 degrees Celsius, study finds

Coronavirus is most likely to spread between five and 15 degrees Celsius, study finds

  • 60% of COVID-19 cases occurred in the temperature range, researchers said
  • They also warned of a second wave in autumn in big cities in middle latitudes
  • A Chinese university released the findings with a COVID-19 prediction platform
  • Here’s how to help people impacted by Covid-19

The novel coronavirus is most likely to spread in places with air temperatures between five and 15 degrees Celsius, a study has discovered.

More than half of the COVID-19 cases have occurred in such condition, according to Chinese researchers.

The team also warned of a second outbreak in autumn in big cities in middle latitudes. The region covers most of North America, Europe, Russia, China and part of Australia and South America.

More than half of the COVID-19 cases have occurred in places with air temperatures between five and 15 degrees Celsius, researchers from China’s Lanzhou University have discovered. Pictured, Chinese commuters wear protective masks at an intersection in Beijing on May 18

Lanzhou University in north-western China announced the findings yesterday as it released its COVID-19 pandemic global prediction platform

The researchers said they were hoping to better understand the virus’s transmission pattern by learning about the environment in which the killer pathogen could survive more easily.

Their research shows that the ideal temperatures for the virus’s transmission are between five and 15 degrees Celsius or 41 to 59 degrees Fahrenheit.

More than 60 per cent of the confirmed global COVID-19 infections were registered in the temperature range, according to a social media post from the university. 

The study was carried out based on the data of approximately 3.75million global confirmed COVID-19 cases in 185 countries and regions from January 21 to May 6, Xinhua reported. Pictured, people eat lunch behind protective plastic barriers in a cafeteria in Seoul on May 20

The study was carried out based on the data of approximately 3.75million global confirmed COVID-19 cases in 185 countries and regions from January 21 to May 6, Xinhua reported. Pictured, people eat lunch behind protective plastic barriers in a cafeteria in Seoul on May 20

The experts also found that the virus’s transmission rates were linked to an area’s humidity.

Around 73.8 per cent of the diagnosed cases were concentrated in regions with an absolute humidity of three to 10 grams in each cubic meter, said a report of the study from state news agency Xinhua.

The study was carried out based on the data of approximately 3.75million global confirmed COVID-19 cases in 185 countries and regions from January 21 to May 6, Xinhua added.

The coronavirus pandemic emerged in the Chinese city of Wuhan in December before sweeping across the world.

So far, more than 346,000 people have died of the disease, and around 5.5 million have caught the bug worldwide.

Chinese health authorities registered no new confirmed COVID-19 cases on Saturday, marking the first time it saw no daily rise since January. Pictured, people wear face masks to avoid catching coronavirus as they ride bicycles in the central business district in Beijing on May 26

Chinese health authorities registered no new confirmed COVID-19 cases on Saturday, marking the first time it saw no daily rise since January. Pictured, people wear face masks to avoid catching coronavirus as they ride bicycles in the central business district in Beijing on May 26

Chinese health authorities registered no new confirmed COVID-19 cases on Saturday, marking the first time it saw no daily rise in the number of native or imported infections since authorities began reporting data in January. 

Seven people were diagnosed with the deadly disease on Monday. All of them were classified as ‘imported cases’, people who bring the virus into China from overseas, said the country’s national health commission today. 

According to official figures, 4,643 people in China have lost their lives in the pandemic and 82,992 have contracted the illness.

More than 80 per cent of the country’s COVID-19 deaths took place in Wuhan, the former epicentre of the pandemic, authorities said.



Chinese social media account which claims ‘the US turns dead bodies into hamburgers’ gets shut

China has shut down a popular social media account with millions of followers for spreading fake news and conspiracy theories.

One of the outlet’s most-read article accused the US of turning deceased COVID-19 patients’ bodies into hamburger patties.

The online outlet, Zhi Dao Xue Gong, translated as ‘Scholar Palace for Ultimate Truth’, amassed nearly two million views in April alone on popular Chinese social media platform WeChat, before being censored on Sunday. 

The online outlet, Zhi Dao Xue Gong, translated as ‘Scholar Palace for Ultimate Truth’, amassed nearly two million views in April on popular Chinese social media platform WeChat, before being censored on Sunday. The file picture shows an icon of the Chinese app, WeChat

The US has recorded a total of 99,462 deaths caused by the killer bug as of Tuesday. Pictured, a patient is taken from an ambulance to the emergency room of a hospital in Arizona on May 24

 The US has recorded a total of 99,462 deaths caused by the killer bug as of Tuesday. Pictured, a patient is taken from an ambulance to the emergency room of a hospital in Arizona on May 24

China has shut down a popular social media account with millions of followers, 'Zhi Dao Xue Gong', for spreading fake news and conspiracy theories including accusing US of turning deceased COVID-19 patients’ bodies into meat patties for hamburgers and hot dogs

China has shut down a popular social media account with millions of followers, ‘Zhi Dao Xue Gong’, for spreading fake news and conspiracy theories including accusing US of turning deceased COVID-19 patients’ bodies into meat patties for hamburgers and hot dogs

The influential account was embroiled in controversy after publishing an article earlier this month, claiming that the coronavirus had already killed millions of Americans whose corpses were processed into cooked meat. 

It comes after Beijing has deleted more than 6,000 articles and closed over 18,500 accounts since March as part of a nation-wide crackdown on Chinese online outlets to curb what it calls ‘fake news’ amid the coronavirus pandemic.

‘Zhi Dao Xue Gong’ started publishing online articles on WeChat in 2015 with an estimated total of one million active followers. In April alone, the online outlet attracted an average of 1.7 million views per post, according to media reports.

In a recent article titled ‘Nearly Dead: The Sinking of the US’, the WeChat account declared that millions of Americans had already been killed by the deadly disease -tens of thousands higher than the recorded toll – without providing any evidence.

The US has recorded a total of 99,462 deaths caused by the killer bug as of Tuesday.

The post also claimed that the dead bodies of coronavirus patients ‘were very likely of being processed into frozen meat, fake beef or pork, or cooked meat, for hamburgers and hot dogs.’

It wrote: ‘Nowadays, a lot of US factories have gone bankrupt. Eating human meat not only can solve the economic problem and shortage of food, but also the problem of dealing with dead bodies. Two birds, one stone.’

One of the outlet's most-read article accused the US of turning deceased COVID-19 patients' bodies into hamburger patties. The screenshot shows the WeChat page before being censored

One of the outlet’s most-read article accused the US of turning deceased COVID-19 patients’ bodies into hamburger patties. The screenshot shows the WeChat page before being censored

In a recent article titled ‘Nearly Dead: The Sinking of the US’, the WeChat account declared that more than one million Americans had already been killed by the deadly disease -tens of thousands higher than the recorded toll – without providing any evidence. People wearing face masks are seen walking on the boardwalk in Seaside Heights, New Jersey on May 24

In a recent article titled ‘Nearly Dead: The Sinking of the US’, the WeChat account declared that more than one million Americans had already been killed by the deadly disease -tens of thousands higher than the recorded toll – without providing any evidence. People wearing face masks are seen walking on the boardwalk in Seaside Heights, New Jersey on May 24

In another article, the account accused China's top coronavirus expert, Zhong Nanshan, of being a member of a 'international poison enterprise'. A man wearing a face mask is pictured reading from his mobile phone as he walks past a poster of Huawei P40 in Beijing on May 1

In another article, the account accused China’s top coronavirus expert, Zhong Nanshan, of being a member of a ‘international poison enterprise’. A man wearing a face mask is pictured reading from his mobile phone as he walks past a poster of Huawei P40 in Beijing on May 1

In another article, the account accused China’s top coronavirus expert, Zhong Nanshan, of being a member of a ‘international poison enterprise’. It also slammed medical journals including The Lancet and Nature as ‘spies’, Chinese media report.

The social media account has been shut down on Sunday for ‘fabricating facts, stoking xenophobia and misleading the public,’ a WeChat spokesperson told The Paper

Another seven accounts associated with ‘Zhi Dao Xue Gong’ have also been closed.

The news came after China launched a crackdown on its online outlets to curb what it calls ‘fake news’ amid the coronavirus pandemic.  

Officials deleted more than 6,000 articles and closed over 18,500 accounts since March, the country’s internet watchdog said in April.

Multiple accounts had promoted false information about the outbreak, causing negative social impact, the Cyberspace Administration of China (CAC) accused. 

The news came after China launched a crackdown on its online outlets to curb what it calls 'fake news' amid the coronavirus pandemic. Chinese President Xi Jinping is pictured attending the opening of the National People's Congress at The Great Hall Of The People on May 22

The news came after China launched a crackdown on its online outlets to curb what it calls ‘fake news’ amid the coronavirus pandemic. Chinese President Xi Jinping is pictured attending the opening of the National People’s Congress at The Great Hall Of The People on May 22

The clampdown was carried out by regional cyberspace authorities, such as the ones in Beijing, Shanghai and Guangdong. The picture taken on February 24 shows a Chinese man wearing a face mask checking his mobile phone while riding a subway in Beijing city

The clampdown was carried out by regional cyberspace authorities, such as the ones in Beijing, Shanghai and Guangdong. The picture taken on February 24 shows a Chinese man wearing a face mask checking his mobile phone while riding a subway in Beijing city

The web authority claimed that some accounts had caused social unrest with ‘fabricated hot topics’ and ‘sensational headlines’ while others were said to have ‘maliciously tampered with the history of the party and the country’. 

Certain authors also posed as authorities to mislead the public, slandered and smeared heroes and martyrs, and promoted sexual content, the CAC slammed.

The clampdown was carried out by regional cyberspace authorities, such as the ones in Beijing, Shanghai and Guangdong.

Major Chinese internet companies, including Tencent, NetEase and Sina, also conducted ‘self-rectification’.